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Introducing the exclusive tokidoki back-to-school collection, featuring innovative bags, stationery, and coloring products. We read and review a lot of books and these books were the best children’s books we read for the first time in 2013. Z Is for Moose by Kelly Bingham is a hilarious alphabet book that will have you and your child giggling throughout. Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn was our first introduction to Lola and I have since memorized this text I have read it so often.
Ganeshaa€™s Sweet Tooth by Sanjay Patel and Emily Haynes is a cute adaptation of the Indian legend of how Ganesha came to write the epic Mahabharata. Aggie the Brave by Lori Ries is a really wonderful book that combines lessons about worry and bravery. Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs: As Retold by Mo Willems is a funny prehistoric spin on the classic Goldilocks and The Three Bears. Sign up above and receive all new No Time for Flashcards posts directly in your email inbox. The family reading the book become the main characters as they explore numerous different adventures together and the children think maybe one day they can have a career in the adventure. The book lends itself to increased verbal interaction, vocabulary building, family bonding and more.
I like to say that if my children find and bolster their own love of reading then the learning will not be a chore and will only be that much easier for them to reinforce their reading skills on their own. Follow Jill {Enchanted Homeschooling Mom}’s board Reading Activities for Kids on Pinterest. Five Little Monkeys and Pete the Cat sound like books I would definitely be buying for my boys!
Do not use any picture of a child, person or animal I have on my blog without my explicit prior authorization. Before the modern distractions of TV, video games and all manner of computer technology, books were the primary means for children to absorb stories. With gorgeous illustrations by Clement Hurd, Margaret Wise Brown’s classic bedtime book is one that has been enjoyed by generations of sleepyheads. A picture book consisting of only 338 words, Maurice Sendak’s most famous book can be viewed as a whimsical flight of fancy or as a psychoanalytic story of anger. A marvel of graphic design, Eric Carle’s hungry caterpillar chews its way through this classic book and eventually emerges as a butterfly.
The first book of seven about a mischievous monkey who is kidnapped by the man in the yellow hat. A childhood favourite for so many, this went on to inspire a generation of illustrators – and a very poor film. A beautifully drawn story from the former children’s laureate about a lonely girl who finds company in a gorilla. This edition contains seven stories, including the beguiling Billy’s Beetle — you have to find the beetle hiding somewhere on each spread. The poem is reproduced at picture-book length with Grey’s striking illustrations and paper engineering. This charming verse story about how different animals behave is less well known than Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar, but more fun. Scarry’s immensely detailed books about everyday life can lead to some good conversations, and are great for children who need to know how things work (more or less all of them). This may not be to everyone’s taste, but there’s no escaping the lavatory when it comes to children’s humour, and this book (translated from the original German) manages to be educational too. Illustrated by Hilda Offen, the Red Fox edition contains two abridged versions of these well-loved Norwegian stories about the woman who shrinks.
It may now be over-familiar, but it’s hard to imagine a library without one of Donaldson’s catchy rhyming tales.
Like Gravett’s Orange, Pear, Apple, Bear, this book by an exceptional writer and illustrator is for very young children. One of the best books about the alphabet, from Thames and Hudson's The Ministry of Letters series. Concerning a lonely hippo who is visited at home by various hippo comrades, this jolly counting book goes down as well as up.
Kerr’s books about Mog the cat are still going strong, but this stand-alone story is perhaps her most original.
Or one of the Ahlbergs' other classic illustrated tales such as Peepo or Each Peach Pear Plum. A sideways look at diversity: the good-natured patchwork elephant disguises his true colour to fit in better with the grey herd, to miserable effect. The first in the series, in which the irrepressible Tim stows away aboard a steamer in high winds. Though undoubtedly more famous for her Charlie and Lola series, Lauren Child’s retelling of this classic fairy tale is wildly inventive. Concerning a hat-thieving fish, this winsome tale of rough justice won the 2014 Kate Greenaway Medal and the 2013 Randolph Caldecott Medal in America.
This charmingly quirky set of drawings of the world, laced with facts and figures, was a surprise bestseller.
A sophisticated narrative by the art historian which runs up to the First World War, written in language any child can understand. An excellent single-volume history of Britain, in simple and elegant language, warmed by an uncomplicated national pride. The diary kept by a young Dutch-Jewish girl during the two years in which her family lived concealed under the Nazi occupation of Holland. This chunky and charmingly old-fashioned volume contains every nursery rhyme you can possibly think of (and many you couldn't).
Andrew Lang’s fin de siecle collections of fairy tales are great, but this illustrated collection of Hans Christian Andersen's stories would make a good starter. There are beautiful editions of individual poems, such as “The Quangle Wangle’s Hat” (illustrated by Helen Oxenbury, Mammoth), but why not opt for the collected works? Every child’s book shelf needs the breadth of an anthology, and this one contains nearly 100 extracts from nursery rhymes, fairy tales and all kinds of stories. The naughty puppet’s story is retold from his own perspective in imitable fashion by Michael Morpurgo, with lovely drawings by Emma Chichester Clark.
The first in a dizzying series that imagines a counterfactual England in which the Jacobites rule into the 19th century while the nefarious Hanoverians plot on the sidelines.
Box sets of The Chronicles of Narnia seem to be out of print, so here’s the first in the series.
E Nesbit’s classic Five Children and It has been brilliantly transplanted by Kate Saunders to the trenches, in a moving homage. This American classic concerns a pig who is rescued from butchery by the web-weaving showmanship of a spider called Charlotte.
The first in the successful series, which has been adapted for the cinema, is set in a fictional Viking world in which dragons are trained as pets. Despite naff modern covers and inferior novels churned out by the deceased author's estate, the original adventures of Hal and Roger deserve to be rediscovered.



Willy, an anaemic and neglected evacuee from south London, is stabled with the gruff bachelor Tom Oakley on his farm.
This first instalment of McKay's marvellous series about the Casson family won the Whitbread Prize in 2001, but remains underrated and underread. Akin to Enid Blyton's young sleuths, St John's modern heroine is a fearless adventuress, probing around her uncle's Cornish town for mysteries (which she certainly finds). From the current Children's Laureate, a thought-provoking novel: young Kaspar joins the non-violent Guardians of his city, working to keep the rebels out. Based on a draft found after the author’s death in 2010, this loveable story concerns a girl stolen from her Himalayan campsite by a yeti and taken to a secret paradise in a volcanic crater. The classic ballet novel; once entranced, a young reader can progress to the rest of the Shoes series. Another fantasy, the first in the series about Meg Murry and the search for her missing father. The first of the Alex Rider spy novels: a James Bond Jr with all the gadgets and none of the misogyny.
The ultimate football novel: Mal Peet's extraordinary debut unfolds as an interview between a sports reporter and the world's best goalkeeper. Unusually for a children's book of the time, this charming whodunnit is set in a contemporary, realistic Berlin peopled with fairly rough types. As sensuous as anything Dahl ever wrote: who could forget James eating his way into the sweet, giant peach, or his perfectly named aunts — Spiker and Sponge? A once-cherished little girl is left orphaned and paupered; her headmistress turns sour and enslaves her as a starving servant at the school. A timelessly silly classic, the first novel in White's mischievous Once and Future King series. A magical tale about a troubled and unloved girl called Mary Lennox, who finds a secret garden in her uncle's lonely house. You can’t have a library without Beatrix Potter, and there’s no messing about with this edition which contains all 23 tales. The collected edition seems to be out of print, but a good place to start would be The Secret of the Unicorn. This is the complete text from Penguin, but Simon & Schuster have published a classy pop-up edition, based on an abridged version, with artwork by Robert Sabuda.
An exquisite novella about a bizarre, ethereal boy encountered by an airman while stranded in the desert overnight. These new illustrations by the author of Charlie and Lola provide a contemporary twist on the Swedish classic. The first in a series set between the wars at a time when children mucked about in boats and built camps by themselves – or at least we like to think they did.
It was a close run thing between the Famous Five and Malory Towers, but the prize must go to the adventures of George and co.
A girl would adore the Chalet School books – and, thrillingly for children who like to stick with a series they know and like, there are nearly 60 of them. No childhood is complete without this novel from 1905, immortalised by the 1970 film starring Jenny Agutter. This new edition, with drawings by David Roberts, is unusual in hiding a little detail on every page. The French classic (there known as Patapoufs et Filifers) is about a fat brother and a thin brother – and the battle that ensues between two warring nations. This is the first in the captivating series about the red-headed orphan and the one that covers her early childhood. The first novel in the much-awarded Chaos Walking trilogy, set in a dystopian world wherein all creatures can see and hear each other's thoughts. Set in a future England under occupation, Meg Rosoff's brilliant novel predated the current vogue for dystopian teenage fiction but has yet to be bettered.
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This list of top 100 books as voted by teachers across America is a great guide for parents (and kids) looking for time-tested and teacher-tested reading material.
Reading is something that resonates with us as editors, as parents, and as the kids we once were ourselves. Most of these books were published before 2013 so they aren’t new , just new to us.A  What was the best book you read in 2013? The book is all about a zebra who is making an alphabet book and his over zealous friend Moose who is very very excited to be involved. The book follows a sister who is looking for her brother in their San Francisco neighborhood. My daughter fell in love with this book before she was even two and wea€™ve read it at the very least weekly (usually daily ) for well over a year. Kids will love this book without ever knowing the historical significance of the original story.
Aggie is getting spayed and both she and her owner go through various emotions from the time they drop her off at the vet until her stitches are removed weeks later.
There are so many funny details in this book that ita€™s as much for the adults reading it to their children as it is for the kids. In this book the three little pigs escape the wolf by escaping the story itself and being blown right off the page. We also liked Journey by Aaron Becker which is a kind of Harold and the Purple Crayon- like fantasy picture book but with a girl heroine.
I loved this post and it inspired me to share the best multicultural books we read in 2013, so thank you! This fun kids book club focuses on one theme each month and each participating Co-Host chooses one storybook of their own choosing and creates a fun activity, craft, lessons, or anything else. As such, written permission must be obtained to use or modify any content seen herein prior to others using it as all infractions will be pursued to the maximum extent allowed by all applicable laws and regulations.
Whether as bedtime stories read by a parent or kids flipping pages themselves, children’s books continue to hold a special place in the hearts of parents and little ones alike. With allusions to earlier children’s books, and rhythmic language, Goodnight Moon is a realistic book that takes on almost fairy tale qualities, the perfect transition between waking life and dreams. After Wilbur, a runt-of-the-litter piglet is saved from slaughter and relocated, he befriends a kindly spider named Charlotte who saves him from slaughter again by weaving messages into her web that dumbfound the farmers. After a tantrum, young boy Max is sent to his room, which transforms into the land of the Wild Things. Seuss titles worthy of this list, but the final book published during his lifetime may simply be his best. Her words remain the most effective way for a child today to grasp the reality of the Holocaust.
The slim books adopt a subversive, jokey voice but the historical points they make are serious. E B White, who also produced a writer's handbook called The Elements of Style, follows his own rules about prose to gloriously stylish effect. The resourceful brothers quest rare animals the world over to take back to zoos, and avoid maiming or death only narrowly on each page.


Initially, it's rather a shock to them both but under Tom's hesitant care Willy thrives and Tom melts at the waif's gratitude. Wynne Jones's marvellous Chrestomanci series, flavoured with Victoriana, has been vastly influential — on J K Rowling, in particular. This modern classic has been reprinted in a new hardback edition to celebrate its 15th birthday. A German professor and his nephew descend through an Icelandic volcano into the bowels of the earth. According to this novel, they are casing the joint, tracking lost relatives and dodging that cruel fate – PDS (Permanent Doll State). Young Arthur (nicknamed Wart) is transformed into all sorts of fish and fowl by his unorthodox tutor Merlin to learn the ways of the world. Alpine Heidi is sent to school in Frankfurt am Main, but grows pale and sickly in the city smog. Whereas Kipling ommitted any mention of God, Ted Hughes's elegant and amusing creation tales bring the Divine Maker back into the story. Tintin helps Captain Haddock track down his ancestral treasure, hindered by nefarious crooks, tropical sharks and the captain's own weakness for rum.
Some of them have now fallen out of print, but this one, the second, is as good a place as any to start. The characters are re-imagined for a new generation in a mode that is perfectly sympathetic to Kenneth Grahame’s words. The longer sequel, The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle, which won the Newbery Medal, is trickier to get hold of, especially if you’re after a pretty edition.
Both are exquisite coming-of-age stories, the first set in France and the second in India, to be read by a girl in her teens. Older children, however, will enjoy this beguiling novel about a girl and her grandmother, and the summer they spend together on a remote island.
When it came time to cultivate a list of the all-time best children's books, we polled our co-workers to ensure a list that's comprehensive, including everything from old classics to newfound favorites. So excited in fact that he cana€™t wait for M to be called and ends up crashing a bunch of other letters. My daughter loved it and while the lesson about creating inclusive environments went over her head the lesson about being true to yourself and doing something that has never been done before didna€™t.
I would read it to kids 5 and older although younger children will like just following the narrative. It never gets boring to read because ita€™s such a calm gentle story about a little girl eager for her special trip with her mom to the library.
My daughter absolutely adored this book because it has two of her favorite things an Elephant ( at least she thought Ganesha was one ) and candy! Ita€™s a great book to read when you need to calm fears before a hospital stay.A  Ia€™m not the only fan of this book in our house in fact ita€™s one of my three year old daughtera€™s favorite books right now. We were picking favorite robots in the first few pages and loving the book more and more as we read it. Not only is this just a really great book to teach kids about what happens to their pets when they go into to be payed or neutered ita€™s also a wonderful book about worry and what it means to be brave. The humor is mostly dry but plentiful and the story itself is engaging as all Willems stories are.
They test out other pages and pick up a dragon and cat ( complete with fiddle) but ultimately want to return home. The best part is that each participant is not given a certain format or activity so they all vary their emphasis and age range. Storytelling is simply one of the most effective means of both educating and entertaining children, and reading is one of the single greatest sparks to a young person’s imagination. When he becomes their king, he triumphs over his primal side and returns to the maternal comforts of a hot meal. Directly addressing the reader, this book is delightfully open-ended after transporting the reader through diverse and magical realms that, much like Seuss’ work in general, appeal to the imagination while in this case also encouraging the reader to avoid complacency.
Insisting he be the sole translator, Gombrich had not finished rewriting it when he died in his nineties. They find there a great cavern, with an (infested) ocean lapping at petrified trees and giant mushrooms. Not quite a parody but certainly a burlesque, it remains profoundly amusing 75 years later. Make sure you get the edition from 1997 with Eileen A Soper’s illustrations, rather than the newer edition in which the text has been modernised. Each page contains a top 100 book title, author, age group, number of pages, book summary, and link back to a table of contents for easy browsing. Everybody is having some sort of rice dish even though they are all from different countries.
The story is about a dinosaur who wants to be a ballerina and while a studio initially allows her to dance ita€™s clear that she is just too big. There is a ton of info in this book and it would be a wonderful tool to talk about how history books dona€™t always tell the whole story. Ganesha breaks his trunk on a jawbreaker in this story and while having a bit of a tantrum is asked to use his broken tusk to scribe an amazing epic a€¦ he agrees as long as he can eat candy while he does it. The story is a familiar one but with the substitution of robots instead of humans basic snow day things get more interesting.
The love between the little boy and his dog jumps off the pages and I got chocked up when the little boy cried on the drive home after dropping the dog off for surgery.
If you arena€™t familiar with this author you need to grab this and a handful of his other titles from the library asap. Together they face and beat the wolf and settle into the brick home of the third pig together with the dragon and cat. You will, however, find five of the most enduring and well-loved children’s books ever. Moosea€™s reaction will turn your kids giggles into chuckles and all the while they will be working on letter recognition.
My 6 year old really enjoyed this book and understood the message well , my 3 year old sat through it no problem too. The story doesna€™t end there and with some help from friends who support her dream they find a way to include everyone.
The story is cute but the illustrations by Sanjay Patel completely suck kids in, ita€™s no shock that his day job is as an animator for Pixar. Seuss’ final book would bear a title with such appropriate finality and grandfatherly encouragement is icing on the cake of a life well lived.
There are so many future lessons about geography, nutrition, and travel packed in this one little book! The perspective and imagination in this book is stunning and well worth many many readings.



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