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Once you have a DR plan in place, the ONLY way to know whether you’re going to be able to recover from a variety of disasters is to simulate some, in production. Doing an initial test when the DR plan is first produced is great, because at least you know that it works, or there are some things you’ve missed (which is almost invariably the case). I’m also amazed by the number of systems that I work with that have ZERO backup processes in place. We just finished testing a whole datacenter failure to an alternate site in the next state. Any successful business is a product of the time, sweat, and forethought that went into it’s creation . Training of  employees, testing of the possible scenarios, and rehearsal of the response according to the plan. After going through the process of creating a sample plan, the team members  come to see many aspects of their company in a new light.
Outlined in this section are ten key points as to the importance of planning disaster recovery strategies. In the event of a disaster, a disaster plan will allow a company the ability to quickly and efficiently go back to a state of production by providing methodologies to lessen the impact of said disaster and a process to get the company back into a productive normal state. A Disaster Recovery Plan should be able to scale to the event.  Meaning the plan should be able to work with an act of terror to the facility to something as simple as an employee tripping over the power cable and unplugging a few key systems. A Disaster Recovery Plan will put in place a means to safeguard a company’s key information assets. The plan will help companies to meet government regulatory standards.  This is important to maintain compliance with these standards and keep in good standings with other companies. A Disaster Recovery Plan will show customers that the company is serious about success and give them added confidence about the organizations abilities to overcome any adversity. Due to the increased dependency of the business over the years on computerized production and research and development,  in creased risk of loss if one of these systems were to go down.  With a well documented Disaster Recovery Plan, its possible to mitigate any damage done to the business due to the loss of one of the said computerized systems.
The Disaster Recovery Plan will allow for concise documentation of polices and procedures for the organization.
For employees, the training brought about the Disaster Recovery Planning process will be valuable as it will prepare them to react quickly and intelligently in the event that a disaster occurs. The plan will provide a means identify key people within the organization to help out in the event of a disaster.  These key people will allow the staff to have someone to “turn to” in the event that something happens to provide guidance and give direction.


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Rather depressingly, 35% of respondents either don’t have a DR plan or have one but have never tested it. RTO and RPO) then your DR plan actually has to work, no matter how carefully you’ve designed it. The day to day process of business can be an arduous task involving many resources, and does not often allow those involved to step back and see the big picture of what could happen in a worst case scenario. People panic in times of high-stress and crisis, and without a set of steps to follow, bad things happen. This means you have to try restoring from your backups and seeing if you can do it within your downtime SLA. I think I’ve only been involved with and heard of a few successful disaster scenarios.
The major steps are all presented and are filled in with a sampling of some of the minor processes and functions that the disaster planning team feel would be appropriate. For members of a Disaster Recovery Team,  it is vitally important to the company that someone should have this big picture what if point of view.
Your disaster recovery plan could be as simple as restoring from the last full database backup, or as complicated as failing over all processing to a remote data center and engaging a 3rd-party company to distribute new DNS routing entries across the Internet.


Of course, business owners often aren’t interested in low-probability potential problems.
What is the point in investing so much time and resource in our company if it could all be turned upside down in an instant by something as simple and commonplace as a summer wildfire? You know who you are – go get a DR plan before a disaster happens and you lose time, data, your job, or all of the above. When disaster strikes, it creates a new dynamic for the business and all involved to respond to.
A complete and functioning Disaster Recovery Plan is a company’s best assurance of continued survival. Lots of people interchange DR and high-availability (HA), but HA is really a set of technologies that you implement to help protect against disasters causing problems. The best way to respond to a new dynamic is to have a blueprint of what actions to take, and what people to involve.
For instance, you might implement database mirroring so that part of the DR plan for a database is to failover to the mirror, keeping the database highly-available, while DR happens on the old principal. If you can push for a DR plan test and everything works, everyone has increased peace of mind.
Or you might implement auto-grow on the transaction log file so that if it runs out of space the database doesn’t become unusable. If you can push for a DR plan test and things go south, you’ll be praised for having exposed the problems. Disaster recovery planning teams need to plan to survive various types of disaster while keeping the business intact and profitable.
Neither of these are doing DR, they’re preventing a disaster from affecting availability. DR in the second case would be what you do to provision more space for the log so the database can come online again.




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