The basic purpose of a written emergency response plan is to,wedding emergency survival kit list,earthquake survival bags - PDF Books

A municipal evacuation plan will help streamline the evacuation process by providing an organized framework for the activities involved in coordinating and conducting an evacuation. The aim of an evacuation plan is to allow for a safe, effective, and coordinated evacuation of people from an emergency area.
A municipal evacuation plan may be a stand-alone plan or part of a larger, overarching municipal emergency response plan. Municipal Evacuation Plans should outline how needed functions will be performed and by what organization (e.g. Consider the characteristics of the municipality that may affect the execution of an incident-specific evacuation plan. Is the municipality single, upper, or lower tier and how will that affect responsibilities during an evacuation? Is the location of the municipality and the populated areas likely to impose particular challenges for an evacuation? List hazards that have the greatest potential to require an evacuation (Refer to the municipal Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (HIRA) or Community Risk Profile).
Does the hazard have the potential to migrate outside of municipal boundaries or does it start elsewhere and migrate into the municipal boundaries? Identify the process for conducting real-time threat assessments and how the real-time threat assessment will inform the decision to evacuate. Since the presence of contaminants in an emergency area will greatly complicate evacuation operations, a municipality’s evacuation plan should take into account procedures and equipment for these situations. In addition to the effects on emergency responders, residents may also be limited in their ability to move through the affected area safely.
In order to prevent the spread of contamination, evacuees may need to be isolated from unaffected locations and populations until being decontaminated. Emergency managers must understand the makeup of the population who are to be evacuated before they can make decisions about transportation modes, route selections, hosting destinations, and the many other elements of an evacuation.
For planning purposes it may be advisable to increase the estimate of evacuees to account the evacuation shadow (these are the people who evacuate though they are not officially requested to do so.) This is a spontaneous evacuation, conducted when people feel they are in danger and begin to leave in advance of official instructions to do so or in spite of advice to shelter-in-place.
Details on populations that may require special assistance during an evacuation may be obtained from the departments and organizations involved in planning, such as public health, social services, etc. To ensure that considerations such as advance warning and transportation are factored into the planning, areas with high concentrations of people needing additional assistance to evacuate should be identified.
Long-term care residents may require vehicles equipped to serve riders in wheelchairs or medical transportation.
An evacuation involving incarcerated individuals would require secure transport and hosting arrangements.
In municipalities where the majority of evacuees make their own transportation and shelter arrangements, it may not be necessary to compile lists of evacuees according to categories (Ideally, evacuees would still register to allow for tracking and inquiry). Evacuations may take place prior to (pre-emptive), during (no-notice), or after (post-incident) an incident has occurred. Given adequate warning about a hazard, sufficient resources, and a likely threat, it is advisable to conduct pre-emptive evacuations. It may be advisable to carry out an evacuation even while a threat is affecting a community. Partial evacuations typically are localized to a specific area of a municipality and may be caused by fires, hazardous materials incidents, etc. Incidents that precipitate a wide-spread evacuation typically cause far-reaching damage and are therefore more likely to compromise critical infrastructure in a manner that hinders evacuee movement.
An internal evacuation is where evacuees are hosted at another location within the same municipality as opposed to being hosted by another municipality. Spontaneous evacuation (self-evacuation) is when people choose to evacuate without explicit direction to do so. If the present location affords adequate protection against the particular incident, emergency managers should consider having people shelter-in-placevii to reduce the number of persons who become part of an evacuation. Once emergency managers have determined the number and geographic distribution of potential evacuees, these statistics can be analyzed against the transportation network. What is the distribution of the evacuating population with respect to roadways and highways?
What planning, operational staff, systems, and activities are needed to implement the chosen tactics during an evacuation? Should lanes be dedicated for high occupancy vehicles and any other special population groups (i.e. Recognize that different traffic management tactics (and different routes) may be more or less appropriate for certain types of situations. These figures are average and do not take into consideration an emergency situation or other factors that may be present during an evacuation.
Pre-planning assists decision-makers in determining suitable transportation options for inclusion in the incident-specific plan. The traffic management section outlines tactics that may be used to move traffic more efficiently.
For incidents of longer duration, these assembly points can serve as collection points for evacuees who have walked or ridden transit from the at-risk area, and who now must wait for transport (buses, etc.) to longer-term sheltering facilities. The ability of a sheltering facility to accommodate such special needs groups will depend on its on-site design and capabilities. By comparing shelter capabilities and capacities with the anticipated evacuation population, a jurisdiction can ensure it has made adequate sheltering arrangements, including the appropriate staffing levels for each shelter. By pre-identifying sheltering facilities, their locations can be evaluated in relation to proposed evacuation routes and other components of the transportation network. In terms of First Nation evacuations, JEMS Service-level Evacuation Standardsx defines short-term shelter services as a period between 1 and 14 days. Municipalities may set-up and support shelters with municipal staff or they may have an agreement with another organization (e.g.
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be used to analyze available data, including highlighting key aspects of the potential evacuation populations. Pre-planning can be used to help determine specific evacuation strategies should one of the pre-identified incidents occur.
The plan must state who has the authority to initiate the notification process and implement the plan. Evacuation should be considered when other response measures are insufficient to ensure public safety. The urgency of an evacuation is determined based on the immediacy of the threat to the community (life, safety, health, and welfare), the resilience of the community, and (depending on the nature of the threat) the availability of resources for evacuation or shelter-in-place. Pre-planning and analysis conducted in the development of the municipal evacuation plan will be instrumental in creating an incident-specific plan (IAP).
Based on the outcome of the real-time threat assessment, consider the type of evacuation required or if shelter-in-place is appropriate. Staging resources and phasing evacuations may alleviate some of the above complicating factors. Information may be pre-scripted and included as part of the Municipal Evacuation Plan or elsewhere (i.e. Consider including information regarding language and communications barriers for at-risk populations. Ongoing communications should be maintained through the length of the evacuation until the return is completed. Detail what departments, organizations, and individuals would have a role in the implementation of the plan and list specific responsibilities.
What are the roles and responsibilities of the lead and other response organizations involvedxii? Who are the partners (additional subject matter experts required in the EOC to provide additional expertise)?
If a third party is contracted by a municipality to provide services in an evacuation, its roles and responsibilities should be outlined within the agreement (e.g. Requests for additional assistance should be made through the PEOC (including requests for Government of Canada assistance). A municipality may choose to identify an Evacuation Coordinator to lead an evacuation with minimum delay and confusion in the event of an emergency.
Regardless of the stage of the evacuation operation there are four roles a municipality may assume while involved in an evacuation effort.
Identify resources needed to support the evacuation and the process for acquiring them (e.g. When the emergency that prompted the evacuation has been resolved it will be necessary to plan for the return of evacuees. Since the degree of damage will likely vary within the affected area it might be beneficial to initiate a phased re-entry process.
Evacuees who self-evacuated using their own means of transportation should be able to return on their own.
What media sources can evacuees use for the most up-to-date information on re-entry procedures? Following the return of evacuees, consider when to terminate the declaration of emergency – reference the Municipal Emergency Response Plan. Discuss who generates the above, when they will be created, to whom they will be presented, and how the lessons learned will be incorporated into the evacuation plan. Successful efforts for public education include community seminars and preparedness pamphlets distributed to residents and businesses.
Based on recommended practices, consider including COOP as part of the risk management process. This municipal evacuation plan will help streamline the evacuation process by providing an organized framework for the activities involved in coordinating and conducting an evacuation.
The aim of this evacuation plan is to allow for a safe, effective, and coordinated evacuation of people from an emergency area in [insert the Name of the Municipality].
To provide Command Staff and other incident management personnel with basic information for planning for the next operational period.
Issued by the Situation Unit personnel for posting information on Status Boards or circulating as required. Preparation: The IMS 209-G is prepared by the Situation Unit Leader or Planning Section Chief. Distribution: The IMS 209-G may be scheduled for presentation to the Planning Section Chief and the other General Staff prior to each Planning Meeting and may be required at more frequent intervals by the Incident or EOC Commander, or the Planning Section Chief. Distribution: Presented to incoming incident management team and distributed as necessary to all activated functions.
The Ontario Incident Management System (IMS) uses specific forms to assist with incident management processes and procedures, as well as to represent a record of decisions and actions.
When completing IMS forms, it is important to accurately reflect the response role and location: Are you working at an incident site, or emergency operations center? Additional information on these concepts may be found in the IMS Doctrine and the Guideline for the Application of IMS at EOCs. Documents the actions developed by the Commander and the Command and General Staff during Planning Meetings. Provides information on contact information and radio assignments for each operational period. Provides information on incident medical aid stations, transportation services, hospitals, and medical emergency procedures, for emergency responders.
Used to indicate which IMS organizational elements are currently activated and the names of the personnel staffing each element.
Records details of notable activities of individual or team resources at various IMS organizational levels, including Units, single resources, Strike Teams, Task Forces, etc. Assists the Safety Officer in completing an operational risk assessment to prioritize hazards and develop appropriate controls by operational period. Used to communicate the decisions made by the Operations Section Chief during the Tactics Meeting concerning resource assignments and needs for the next operational period.
Provides an inventory of all transportation and support vehicles and equipment assigned to the incident.
Provides the Air Operations Branch with the number, type, location, and specific assignments of aircraft.
Ensures that resources checking out of the incident have completed all appropriate incident business, and provides the Planning Section information on resources released from the incident. Purpose: This form documents the actions developed by the Incident Commander and the Command and General Staff during Planning Meetings. Preparation: IMS 1001 is completed following each formal Planning Meeting, conducted by the Incident or EOC Commander and the Command and General Staff. If IMS Form 1001 (Consolidated IAP) is not used, the IMS 202 form will be used as the cover page of the IAP.
Please note, in such cases, the IMS 202 (Incident Objectives form) serves as a cover sheet and is not considered a complete IAP until all required forms are attached. If IMS Form 1001 (Consolidated IAP) is used, relevant content from the IMS 202 will be transferred to the IMS 1001 form. IMS 202 fulfills its normal function as the Incident Objective form, and also is used as the cover page of the IAP. Required content is transposed to IMS 1001 Consolidated IAP and the IMS 202 is retained by the Planning Section and filed by the Documentation Unit.
Note: This Form may be completed or updated any time the number of personnel assigned to the incident increases or decreases, or a change in personnel assignment occurs.
Purpose: The Resource Assignment List (IMS 204) informs Operations Section personnel of incident assignments. Preparation: The IMS 204 is normally prepared by the Resources Unit, using guidance from the Incident Objectives (IMS 202), Operational Planning Worksheet (IMS 215-G), and the Operations Section Chief. Distribution: Duplicated and distributed as part of the Incident Action Plan (version IMS 1001 or IMS 202).
Purpose: The Incident Telecommunications Plan provides information on contact information and radio assignments for each operational period. Preparation: The Incident Telecommunications Plan is prepared by the Communications Unit Leader in the Logistics Section and given to the Planning Section Chief for inclusion in the IAP (as required).


Distribution: The Incident Telecommunications Plan is duplicated and given to all recipients as part of the IAP. Purpose: The Medical Plan (IMS 206) provides information on incident medical aid stations, transportation services, hospitals, and medical emergency procedures, for emergency responders. Preparation: The IMS 206 is prepared by the Medical Unit Leader and reviewed by the Safety Officer t.
Distribution: The IMS 206 is given to all recipients as part of the Incident Action Plan (IAP). Purpose: The Incident Organization Chart (IMS 207) is used to indicate which IMS organizational elements are currently activated and the names of the personnel staffing each element.
Preparation: The IMS 207 is prepared by the Resource Unit Leader and reviewed by the Incident or EOC Commander. Preparation: The IMS 208 is an optional form that may be included and completed by the Safety Officer as an attachment for the Incident Action Plan (IAP), or stand-alone form. Distribution: The IMS 208 or content from the IMS 208 may be reproduced with the IAP and given to all recipients as part of the IAP. Sued by the Situation Unit personnel for posting information on Status Boards or circulating as required. Purpose: Personnel and equipment arriving at the incident can check in at various incident locations.
Used for recording the initial location of personnel and equipment and thus a subsequent assignment can be made.
Managers at these locations record this information and forward it to the Resource Unit as soon as possible.
Distribution: Check-In Lists, which are completed by personnel at various check-in locations, are provided to the Resources Unit, Demobilization Unit and the Finance and Administration Section. Purpose: The EOC Check-In List form is designed to gather information on all resource personnel operating at an EOC. Distribution: This form is used by the Planning Section to assist in completing the Organization Assignment List (IMS Form 203) and Incident Organization Chart (IMS Form 207). Purposes: The General Message (IMS 213) is used by the incident dispatchers to record incoming messages that cannot be orally transmitted to the intended recipients.
Preparation: The IMS 213 may be initiated by incident dispatchers and any other personnel on an incident. Purpose: The Activity Log (IMS 214) records details of notable activities of individual or team resources at various IMS organizational levels, including Units, single resources, Strike Teams, Task Forces, etc. Distribution: Completed IMS 214 forms are submitted to supervisors, who forward them to the Documentation Unit.
Purpose: The purpose of the Incident Action Plan Safety Analysis (IMS 215A) is to aid the Safety Officer in completing an operational risk assessment to prioritize hazards, safety, and health issues, and to develop appropriate controls.
Preparation: The IMS 215-A is typically prepared by the Safety Officer during the incident action planning cycle. Distribution: This form is attached to the Incident Safety Plan and is distributed according to the instructions for Safety Plans.
Purpose: The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Tactics Worksheet is used to communicate the decisions made by the Operations Section Chief during the Tactics Meeting, concerning the specific tactics to be accomplished for the next operational period. Please Note: if the incident involves the deployment of physical resources with specific work assignments, the IMS-215-G Operational Planning Worksheet should be used instead (or alongside) the IMS 215-E. Distribution: When complete, the IMS 215-E is distributed to the Planning Section (Resources Unit) to assist in the preparation of the Assignment Lists (IMS 204). Purpose: The Operational Planning Worksheet is used to communicate the decisions made by the Operations Section Chief during the Tactics Meeting concerning resource assignments and needs for the next operational period.
Distribution: When the Branch, Division, or Group work assignments and accompanying resource allocations are agreed upon, the form is distributed to the Planning Section (Resources Unit) to assist in the preparation of the Assignment Lists (IMS 204). Preparation: The IMS 218 is prepared by Ground Support Unit personnel at intervals specified by the Ground Support Unit Leader. Distribution: Initial inventory information recorded on the form should be given to the Resource Unit. Purpose: The Air Operations Summary provides the Air Operations Branch with the number, type, location, and specific assignments of aircraft.
Preparation: The Operations Section Chief or the Air Operations Branch Director completes the summary during each Planning Meeting. Distribution: After the summary is completed by Air Operations personnel (except item 11), the form is given to the Air Support Group Supervisor, who completes the form by indicating the designators of the helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft assigned missions during the specified operational period. Purpose: The Demobilization Check-Out (IMS 221) ensures that resources checking out of the incident have completed all appropriate incident business, and provides the Planning Section information on resources released from the incident.
Preparation: The IMS 221 is initiated by the Planning Section, or a Demobilization Unit Leader if designated. Demobilization Unit Leader completes the top portion of the form and checks the appropriate boxes in Block 6 that may need attention after the Resources Unit Leader has given written notification that the resource is no longer needed.
Distribution: After completion, the IMS 221 is returned to the Demobilization Unit Leader or the Planning Section. Note: Members are not released until form is complete when all of the items checked in Block 6 have been signed off. Purpose: The Claims Log is used to provide a summary of information related to the tracking of incident-related claims.
Preparation: Completed by the Claims Unit Leader in the Finance and Administration Section.
Purpose: The Resource Request Form (IMS 260) is used to request and track resources that are required for an incident.
Preparation: Generally, IMS 260 is initiated by the Requestor and submitted to the EOC Liaison, who in turn, submits the document to the EOC Logistics Section. Distribution: Completed forms are distributed to appropriate Branches and Units within the Logistics Section (generally the Supply Unit or Facilities Unit). 1 IMS Forms identified with an asterisk (*) are typically included in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) as an attachment or excerpted into the IMS 1001 Consolidated IAP). Incidents of Medical Emergencies – comprising incidents of food poisoning during company-held events or on any known premises to which the company’s name is associated as the main provider.
You may refer to a separate article entitled Basic Outline for a Crisis Management Plan in order to gain perspectives on the basics of crisis management. Damage to property or the environment may also trigger an evacuation if it poses a risk to the safety, health, and welfare of people. The aim is achieved by detailing evacuation considerations, hosting arrangements, transportation management, and return planning.
This includes details on the municipality, hazards that may necessitate an evacuation, and demographics. Emergency responders may not be able to enter an area without subjecting themselves to an unreasonable level of risk, or they may need to wear and use specialized personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect themselves.
Decontamination could necessitate specialized screening and cleaning resources, and expertise, and may be required before people are transported to advanced care and sheltering facilities. All activities and efforts should be focused on moving these people from the at-risk area to places of safety in a timely manner. It has been estimated that between 5 and 20 percent of people will anticipate an evacuation and self-evacuate.
This list should contain the names of persons needed to restart systems that must be in place before evacuees can return home (e.g. A pre-emptive evacuation may be undertaken when it is clear that if delayed, conditions (weather or other hazard) would impede evacuation. There is often on-scene activity by emergency response personnel who may direct the evacuation.
Evacuations of this type often involve a large number of evacuees, possibly from more than one municipality. Structural damage to the transportation system, such as bridges, tunnels, and highway systems may render them unsafe for use.
While the primary goal of any response action is to save lives, the ability to evacuate people quickly and efficiently should be weighed against the risks of remaining in place.
Their understanding of the regional transportation network enables them to identify ways to improve the carrying capacity of roadways and transit systems in a safe manner.
In most evacuation scenarios, the majority of evacuee movements will take place on roadways and highways, in both personal vehicles and transit vehicles. The plan may identify a number of options, but requires planners to select and implement only certain tactics based on the specific circumstances during the evacuation. The real-time threat assessment, type of evacuation, resources available and needed, and the number of people to be evacuated will dictate what transportation options are best.
The challenge lies in identifying those tactics that provide the greatest increase in carrying capacity while being realistic in terms of time and resource requirements. Due to the uncertain nature of incidents that trigger evacuations, the evacuees may be able to return directly to their residence or place of employment from the assembly point once it is safe to do so. Evacuation planners should determine which special needs groups should be routed to particular shelters, and how to incorporate such direction into the evacuation plan. Planners should assess shelters’ locations, as well as their capabilities and capacities, facilities and resources, in relation to how evacuee traffic will be routed.
Municipalities may use this standard as a guide for selecting shelters and planning for shelter services. Based on the location and type of hazard, a municipality can prioritize which areas (sectors) should evacuate first, and have pre-identified decision points and triggers for declaring an evacuation. That authority may lie with key individuals, such as any member of the Municipal Emergency Control Group or a department head. For known site-specific risks, incident-specific information may be added to the municipal evacuation plan. Determine the evacuation area given the emergency situation and estimate the time and resources required to safely evacuate the area.
In addition, consider public education campaigns to advise the public on plans to re-unify families in the event of separation during an emergency.
For example, once a building has been evacuated make a mark on the front door or most visible location.
These phases include pre-warning, evacuation, ongoing communications, and return (discussed in the Return section).
It is important to ensure that they contain realistic expectations of each municipality’s capabilities. The municipality should work with its records management staff to review its registration and inquiry practices to ensure that they permit the disclosure of evacuee information to relevant parties (i.e. The Evacuation Coordinator may be responsible for making arrangements for shelter, food, clothing, and other essentials. This includes restoring the physical infrastructure where possible or desirable as well as addressing the emotional, social, economic and physical well-being of those involved. If a municipality provided transportation to shelters, it may have to organize return transportation for those evacuees.
Consider locations of municipal services, facilities and infrastructure as they may be affected by an evacuation. It assigns responsibilities to municipal employees, by position, for implementation of the [insert Name of the Municipality] Evacuation Plan.
It should contain the most accurate and up-to-date information available at the time it is prepared.
Additional hazard or discipline-specific versions or sections may be developed or used as required. In addition to a briefing document, the IMS 201 also serves as an initial action worksheet and a permanent record of the initial response to the incident.
Ideally, the IMS 201 is duplicated and distributed before the initial briefing of the Command and General Staff and other responders as appropriate. When all attachments are included, the IAP specifies the objectives, strategies, tactics, resources, organization, communications plan, medical plan, and other appropriate information for use in managing an incident response for the next operational period. Once the Command and General Staffs agree to the assignments, the assignment information is given to the appropriate Divisions, Groups and Sectors. Provide a basic reference from which to extract information for handovers and inclusion in any after-action report. When all attachments are included, the plan specifies the objectives, strategies, tactics, resources, organization, communications plan, medical plan, and other appropriate information for use in managing an incident response for the next operational period. Information may be directly inputted in designated cells (above), or attached separately (below). In this case, the IMS 202 would become the IAP cover page and additional IMS forms attached to create a full IAP.
This form is used to complete the Incident Organization Chart (IMS 207) and may be included or attached to the Incident Action Plan.
Once the Command and General Staffs agree to the assignments, the assignment information is given to the appropriate Divisions, Groups and Sectors (often via the Incident Telecommunications Centre). It must be approved by the Incident or EOC Commander, but may be reviewed and initiated by the Planning Section Chief and Operations Section Chief as well. Information from the Telecommunications Plan on frequency assignment is normally placed on the appropriate Assignment List (IMS 204). Information from the plan pertaining to incident medical aid stations and medical emergency procedures may be noted on the Assignment List (IMS 204). Personnel responsible for supervisory organizational positions should be listed in each box, as required.
A chart is completed for each operational period and updated when organizational changes occur. In many cases, a specific check-in location or point may be established for an entire incident. Incident Dispatches, upon receipt of a check-in message by radio, record the information on the Check-In List and then give the information to the Resource Unit. The Resources Unit maintains a master list of all equipment and personnel that have reported to the incident.
If additional pages are needed for any form page, use a black IMS 211 and repaginate, as needed.


Activity Logs should be maintained by all individuals involved in incident response (where feasible). All completed original forms must be given to the Documentation Unit, which maintains a file of all IMS 214 forms. This form communicates to the Operations and Planning Section Chiefs safety and health issues identified by the Safety Officer. When the Operations Section Chief is preparing for the tactics meeting, the Safety Officer collaborates with the Operations Section Chief to complete the Incident Action Plan Safety Analysis.
It may also be attached to the IAP, or influence General Safety Messages recorded in IMS 202 and IMS 1001. Its completion often involves Logistics personnel, Planning Section Personnel, and the Safety Officer.
The IMS 215-G is used by the Planning Section (Resources Unit) to complete the Assignments List (IMS 204) and by the Logistics Section Chief for ordering resources for the incident.
Its completion often involves logistics personnel, the Resources Unit, and the Safety Officer. The Logistics Section will use a copy of this worksheet for preparing requests for resources required for the next operational period. This information is used by the Ground Support Unit in the Logistics Section to maintain a record of the types and locations of the vehicles and equipment on the incident. Subsequent change to the status or location of transportation and support vehicles should be provided to the Resource Unit immediately. General air resource assignment information is obtained from the Operational Planning Worksheet (IMS 215-G).
This information is provided to Air Operations personnel who, in turn, give the information to the Resource Unit. The individual resource will have the appropriate overhead personnel sign off on any checked box(es) in Block 6 prior to release from the incident. If additional pages are needed for any form page, use a blank IMS 221 and repaginate as needed.
A copy of completed logs should also be submitted to the Documentation Unit for record purposes. The EOC Logistics Section will assign the resource request to the appropriate Branch and Unit Supply Facilities, to fill the request either from its inventories or by exercising its purchasing authority. The pointers below serve as basic guidelines on the content necessary under each component. As we provide the basic guidelines on how to accomplish the template, you will acquire more insights into and explanations about the contents of such a plan. Purpose Replace all italicized captions (Name of Company) under this section with the user’s official company or business name.
Other examples of medical emergencies include near-drowning incidents, spread of diseases, biological threats, and other similar incidents in premises or venues where the company’s name is associated as the provider for the event being held.
Communication Responses Protocol (List of Emergency Contacts) Indicate the name, the position, the profession, the role (team leader or team member), the services, supplies, tools, equipment, and technology provided. In addition, another article entitled Sample Crisis Management Plan for a Wedding Event illustrates some examples of critical event scenarios and their corresponding action plans. The guideline presents evacuation planning concepts that may be applied for various scales of evacuations and sizes of municipalities. The plan also sets out the procedures for notifying the members of the Municipal Emergency Control Group, municipal and other responders, the public, the province, neighbouring communities, and as required, other impacted and interested parties, of the emergency.
Decisions should be made on the review and revision cycle of the plan, and who is responsible for it.
Evacuations are often multi-jurisdictional activities, making extensive coordination amongst numerous departments and governments necessary.
More research and analysis will likely be undertaken in the pre-planning phase than is reported in the plan.
Sectors may also be established by using census or enumeration areas, or natural geographic barriers. The nature of the contaminants will vary and different contaminants may require different approaches to decontamination and treatment. As a result, hazardous materials (HAZMAT) procedures should be incorporated into the evacuation plan. In such scenarios, sheltering in place must be considered as a strategy for protecting public safety (see the Shelter-in-Place section 2.5).
The size and demographics of the population are significant factors in determining how to conduct an evacuation.
A partial evacuation is most often internal – that is the evacuees are hosted elsewhere within the municipality, rather than being hosted in a separate municipality. Decision-makers must be willing to make decisions with whatever information is available at the time.
This will require intensive effort by emergency management personnel to coordinate, transport, and shelter the affected populations, and will place greater demands on staff and resources. If these sites are located on evacuation routes, those routes may be unavailable, and alternatives will need to be identified. Partners that could be involved include the local police service, Ontario Provincial Police, Ministry of Transportation, municipal transportation departments, etc.
Given the potentially large numbers of vehicles that will be accessing the roadway network at the same time, it is important to consider what can be done to increase the capacity of roadways.
If possible, transportation staff should employ traffic modeling to test the routes and tactics to be included in the evacuation plan. Assembly points are typically well-known landmarks that have the capacity to handle large numbers of people, have bus access, and an indoor sheltering area. As part of the planning process, planners should estimate the number of evacuees that may require shelter compared to those who will make their own arrangements. If shelters are run by another organization, it is advisable for municipal staff to work closely with shelter operators to provide regular updates on the emergency situation and for the municipality to be aware of the status of evacuation operations.
Significant evacuee populations may be mapped against the proposed evacuation transportation and sheltering network to determine projected demand levels on their chosen travel routes. The person responsible for maintaining the notification list for internal personnel and external partners should be clearly indicated. Determine the population requiring evacuation based on the type of evacuation required, the delineation of the evacuation area, and the population statistics compiled and analysed during pre-planning.
Public alerting may be the responsibility of the Community Emergency Management Coordinator, the Emergency Information Officer, an Evacuation Coordinator, or other as identified by the municipality and outlined in the plan. The agreement should also define the anticipated costs or fees associated with the delivery of the services. Evacuation operations will remain under the overall direction of the Municipal Emergency Control Group.
As with the initial evacuation, numerous resources, especially personnel and transportation related resources will be required to successfully return evacuees to the affected area. This plan also sets out the procedures for notifying the members of the Municipal Emergency Control Group, municipal and other responders, the public, the province, neighbouring communities, and as required, other impacted and interested parties, of the emergency. The IMS 209-G is duplicated and distributed to the Incident or EOC Commander and staff, all section Chiefs, Planning Section Unit Leaders, and organization dispatch centers. It is important to ensure the sections on Background, Current Situation, Map and Summery of Current actions (3-6) are given to the Situation Unit, while the sections on Current Organization and Resource Summary (7-8) are given to the Resources Unit.
These forms are designed for all-hazard use and are applicable to both site-level and EOC-level responses.
May also be used as a cover sheet for the IAP (if the IMS 1001 is not used), with other IMS forms attached, as required.
Complete only the blocks where positions have been activated, and add additional blocks as needed, especially for Organization Representatives and all Operations Section organizational elements.
Check-in consists of reporting specific information which is recorded on the Check-In List. Contact information for sender and receiver can be added for communications purposes to confirm resource orders.
The form may be placed at the EOC reception for signature by all arriving staff, or completed independently within each IMS function at the start of each operational period and forwarded to the Planning Section.
This form is used to send any message or notification to incident personnel that require hard-copy delivery. Activity Logs may also be maintained at the group level (units, strike teams, task forces, etc.). Other, hazard-specific versions of this form may also be used, depending on nature of the incident. After the form is completed during the Tactics Meeting, it is shared with the rest of the Command and General Staff as soon as possible (at latest, during the Planning Meeting).
The Logistics Section may use a copy of this worksheet for preparing requests for resources required for the next operational period.
After the Tactics Meeting, the form is shared with the rest of the Command and General Staff ASAP (at latest, during the Planning Meeting). The Air and Fixed-Wing Support Groups provide specific designators of the air resources assigned to the incident.
IMS 260 must be approved by the Operations Section Chief and circulated to the Logistics, Finance & Admin, and Planning Sections to complete their respective portions. Readers will perceive the tool's importance as a set of preconceived action plans in cases of emergency situations.
The pointers on how to complete the template below furnish basic information pertaining to each essential element in a crisis contingency plan. Critical Scenarios – include situations that are affected by natural or man-made critical situations such as the occurrence of natural calamities, fire, theft, white-collar fraud, terrorist attacks, violation of federal laws with threats of closure or suspension, incarceration, and payment of substantial fines. It should be clear to all the users of the crisis management plan that the chain of communication and command should always begin from the person who is indicated as the number one (1) in the list. If you're looking for more sample forms and downloadable templates, check out Bright Hub's resource guide Over 50 Free Project Management Templates and Sample Forms. The detail required in a Municipal Evacuation Plan may vary according to the needs of the municipality. The plan should identify lead departments and considerations for the development of incident-specific plans (Incident Action Plans). They may have little or no time to wait for additional information because any delay may have a significant impact on public safety. Emergency responders may require personal protective equipment, as responder safety will be critical. In cases where the transportation network is severely restricted by such damage, sheltering in place may be a safer short-term alternative.
This will provide data to help quantify the benefits of different strategies and support an informed decision as to the best ones for the particular region and transportation network. Pre-identifying sufficient assembly points in relation to the transportation network and evacuation routes will allow these locations to be incorporated into the evacuation plan. In addition, planners should consider special needs that may need to be accommodated within a shelter (e.g.
A clear and succinct notification process must show who is responsible for making the notification contacts and list the primary and secondary notification methods. List details of the population to be evacuated including numbers of evacuees and special requirements. It may be necessary to establish agreements with other communities when an emergency is threatening or occurring if mutual assistance agreements are not in place or may be insufficient to address the emergency. If the municipality contracts registration to a third party, the municipality is still responsible for disclosure of the evacuee information.
This plan also identifies lead departments and outlines considerations for the development of incident-specific plans (Incident Action Plans). Detailed instructions and a brief overview of the form’s purpose, preparation and distribution accompany each form. The composition and size of the organization is dependent on the specifics and magnitude of the incident and is scalable and flexible.
In both cases, the appropriate boxes should be checked, indicating the purpose(s) of the IMS 208. These logs provide a basic reference from which to extract information for inclusion in any after-action report.
It may be useful in some disciplines or jurisdictions to pre-fill IMS 215-E copies prior to incidents (e.g. Examples of service providers include medical specializations, technological expertise, heavy equipment, or those that can provide additional manpower resources. By providing information about planning techniques, strategies, and tactics, the guideline aids emergency management staffi in determining what information should be considered when creating an evacuation plan.
Different types of hazards may dictate variations in the criteria for these categories (e.g. The Provincial Emergency Operations Centre (PEOC) should be notified of an evacuation as soon as possible. Contact information for the sender and receiver can be added for communications purposes to confirm resource orders (see also the IMS 260-RR).
For those assignments involving risks and hazards, mitigations or controls should be developed to safeguard responders, and appropriate incident personnel should be briefed on the hazards, mitigations, and related measures.
Technological expertise, tools, and equipment refer to those with high-tech capabilities or those that are computer-aided and are not readily available in the market. This guideline aligns with the Template for the Development of a Municipal Evacuation Plan (Appendix 1). The IMS 207 may be used as a wall-size chart and printed on a plotter for better visibility.



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