Hurricane isaac preparations,prepare home for winter storm,hurricane plantation - Easy Way

Isaac made landfall in southeast Louisiana, in Plaquemines Parish, near the mouth of the Mississippi River at 6:45 PM CDT.
We have been waiting for the upgrade from tropical storm to hurricane, and it finally materialized this afternoon shortly before 1 PM CDT as hurricane hunters were able to finally find maximum surface winds at 80 miles per hour in Isaac. Since Isaac’s track through the Caribbean and into the Gulf of Mexico, Isaac is responsible for at least 29 deaths according to the AP, with a large majority of these casualties occurring in Haiti. Here is the latest rainfall totals possible across the southeast from the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC). If you would like to make a donation to the Red Cross to help provide critical supplies and services to families and individuals in their time of need, please click here. When he's not keeping EarthSky's community up-to-date on global weather happenings, meteorologist Matt Daniel is the weekend Meteorologist for 13WMAZ (CBS) in Macon, Georgia. On August 28, 2012, tropical storm Isaac achieved hurricane force and was predicted to make landfall on the Gulf Coast of the United States sometime overnight. NHC forecasters expected Isaac to strengthen a bit before reaching shore, and warned of potential flooding from rainfall of 7 to 14 inches (18 to 36 centimeters), with localized precipitation up to 20 inches (50 centimeters). The five-day forecast suggested that the hurricane and its remnants would head straight up the Mississippi River basin and perhaps to the Ohio River—potentially offering some relief in areas where the river has been exceptionally low. NASA is just days from launching an intensive multi-year study of hurricane formation and evolution in the Atlantic Ocean. Read a more detailed description of Isaac from the satellite view at NASA’s Hurricane Resource Page. And here’s an image that shows various wind speeds when Isaac was about to come ashore on Aug. Todd covers the environment and severe weather for the Asbury Park Press, which he joined on Earth Day in 1985. This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged ashore, forecast, Hurricane Isaac, image, landfall, map, NOAA, satellite, wind speeds. Isaac's track is forecast to bring it to New Orleans seven years after Katrina hit as a much stronger storm on Aug. At mid-day Tuesday, Hurricane Isaac was a Category 1 hurricane, packing winds of 75 mph and moving toward the mouth of the Mississippi at 10 mph. Isaac is not a strong hurricane (Hurricane Katrina was a Category 3 when it struck New Orleans in 2005), but it is a very large hurricane, extending more than 200 miles. A hurricane warning is in effect for New Orleans, Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas, and for areas east of Morgan City, La., to the Mississippi-Alabama border. A tropical storm warning is in effect for the area from Destin, Fla., to the Mississippi-Alabama border.
The News Service of Florida reports that an advisor to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said early Monday evening he does not expect further changes in the party convention schedule, despite Tropical Storm Isaac barreling toward the northern gulf coast.
On Wednesday, the storm was looking to make landfall in Florida in the early hours of Monday, in the same area where Hurricane Andrew made landfall exactly 20 years ago Friday. Further out to sea, in the mid-Atlantic, the hurricane center is tracking yet another serious storm it expects to be a tropical storm within days. Hurricane Isaac is heading for New Orleans and the mouth of the Mississippi, where it’s expected to make landfall late Tuesday night. At least, according to Rush Limbaugh, the track near Tampa was geared to cancelling the RNC.
Hurricane Isaac, a massive storm spanning 180 miles from its center with winds up to 90 mph (and even 113 reportedly in some areas near New Orleans), was declared a Category 1 hurricane Tuesday as it made its way inland on the Gulf coast.A It has now been downgraded to a tropical storm. A flash flood warning has been issued for most of the north shore of Louisiana and part of Mississippi.A Fifty-six parishes have declared a state of emergency. The biggest threat at this point is flooding from the heavy rain (the winds have subsided).
About 120 members of the National Guard have rescued more than 100 in the area, andA authorities are deciding whether to intentionally breach the levee to relieve pressure on the structure.
Weather ChannelThe coast in Waveland, Miss., usually extends about 100 yards past homes but is not creeping onto the streets. GettyRuffin Henry and Scout the dog swim in the rising water of Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans, La. As it passed through the northern Caribbean, around south Florida, and into Louisiana and the Middle Mississippi Valley, Hurricane Isaac brought lots of rain, some of it beneficial, and some of it not. In addition to capturing detailed images of tropical storms, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite is ideally suited to measure rainfall from space.
Unfortunately, the storm caused extensive flooding in Haiti and was blamed for 24 fatalities, while the neighboring Dominican Republic reported 5 fatalities. According to NOAA's Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, most of the remnants of Tropical cyclone Isaac are now part of an elongated center of low pressure over the Alabama-Georgia border that is spreading clouds and showers along the U.S.
Tropical Depression Isaac's Remnants continued soaking the Ohio Valley and are moving into the Mid-Atlantic, while Kirk became post-tropical in the northern Atlantic, Tropical Storm Leslie is strengthening and headed north. This visible image from the MODIS instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite shows the remnants of Tropical Depression Isaac (09L) over the central United States on Aug. The National Hurricane Center noted that Leslie is generating rough surf that is affecting the Leeward Islands and will begin affecting Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands during the night on Sept. Tropical Depression 10E formed 320 miles (510 km) south of the southernmost tip of Baja California at 5 p.m. This visible image of Tropical Storm Isaac over moving over the Mississippi Valley, Hurricane Kirk and Tropical Storm Leslie in the central Atlantic Ocean. The GOES-13 image showed that Kirk continued to be a compact hurricane, and hurricane force winds extend just 15 miles (30 km) from the center. Isaac is expected to turn northeast and track over the mid-Mississippi Valley, and into the Ohio Valley on Labor Day, Monday, Sept. With Hurricane Isaac making landfall on the northern Gulf coast almost 7 years to the day that Hurricane Katrina made landfall and in almost the same location in southeastern Louisiana that Katrina did, it is natural to compare the two storms. Fortunately, Isaac impacted the coast as a much weaker Category 1 hurricane and was a tropical storm prior to that; Katrina made landfall as a much more powerful Category 3 storm and was previously an extremely powerful Category 5 storm. Actually, for most of its life, Isaac lacked a core and only really began to organize and intensify when it neared the coast, which was when the data for this image was collected.
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's Precipitation Radar (PR) data were used in this August 29, 2012 at 0307 UTC (August 28, 2012 at 10:07 PM CDT) image to show a 3-D view of rainfall within Isaac. An animation of NOAA's GOES-13 satellite observations from August 28-30, 2012, shows Hurricane Isaac make two landfalls in southeastern Louisiana on Aug.
This visible true color image of Hurricane Isaac was taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug.
NASA satellites are providing forecasters with data on rainfall rates within Tropical Storm Isaac as it continues to track over Louisiana, Mississippi and spread northward into the lower Mississippi Valley. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite twice flew directly above Hurricane Isaac as it was starting to pound Louisiana with strong winds and heavy rainfall. Due to Isaac's slow movement and intense rainfall, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects a prolonged period of flooding in the affected area. A three-dimensional view of rainfall within then Hurricane Isaac was made at NASA Goddard using TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data.
Isaac hasn't moved much over the last two days, and continues a slow crawl to the north at 8 mph (13 kmh). In addition to the heavy rains, storm surge and tropical-storm-force winds, isolated tornadoes are possible along the central Gulf Coast region and parts of the lower Mississippi River Valley through the day on Aug. Hurricanes can be thought of as heat engines that ingest warm, moist air at low levels in the atmosphere, convert it into energy in the form of wind and rain, and then eject cool, dry air at high levels. MISR observes the daylit Earth continuously, viewing the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude every nine days. Exceptionally crisp nighttime images of Hurricane Isaac as it made landfall this week were made possible by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite (NPP). No other operational satellite available to forecasters can provide such clear nighttime images, says Kathy Strabala, a meteorologist and assistant scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Meteorologists also can use these nighttime images along with observations from other satellites such as the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to help forecast the strength and direction of hurricanes. Lindstrom says this information is useful in indicating hurricane intensification, the potential for severe weather, heavy rain and turbulence.
Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Department of Defense.
Tropical Storm Isaac continues to bring high winds and heavy rainfall to much of the Gulf Coast. Isaac - once a Category 1 hurricane and now a strong tropical storm with maximum sustained winds of 70 miles per hour (60 knots) - continues to create havoc across the Gulf Coast, from eastern Texas to Florida. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Hurricane Center, strong bands of thunderstorms continue to develop over water in the storm's eastern semicircle and southwest of the center. Hurricane Isaac is continuing to drop heavy rainfall over Louisiana and Mississippi, and NASA's TRMM satellite identified that rainfall as the storm was making landfall.
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew over Hurricane Isaac twice on the night that Isaac made landfall in Louisiana and headed for New Orleans.
In the first of the two overflights, the TRMM radar saw two hot towers in the eyewall of Hurricane Isaac just hours before landfall. Two images were created by Owen Kelley, of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
The TRMM radar happened to overfly Hurricane Isaac again just five hours later, shortly after the eyewall made landfall. Unfortunately for New Orleans and surrounding areas, TRMM sees that Hurricane Isaac's eyewall was remarkably well organized at that time, despite having made landfall. An animation of satellite observations from August 27-29, 2012, shows Hurricane Isaac move through the Gulf of Mexico and make its first landfall in southeastern Louisiana on Aug. NASA and NOAA satellites continue to provide detailed information to forecasters at the National Hurricane Center. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured a view of Isaac's rainfall rates on Aug. A hurricane warning is in effect for east Of Morgan City, Louisiana to the Mississippi-Alabama border, including metropolitan New Orleans, Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas. Flooding is a big threat from Isaac because of its slow movement, and because it is drawing a lot of energy from the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico.
Seven years after the powerful Category 3 Hurricane Katrina caused widespread devastation along the Gulf Coast, a Category 1 Hurricane Isaac, with maximum sustained winds of 80 miles per hour (70 knots), is making landfall today in southeast Louisiana. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina's maximum wind speeds increased dramatically as the storm passed over a warm ocean circulation feature called the Loop Current that is part of the Gulf Stream. This color-enhanced image of sea surface heights in the northeastern Gulf, produced using data from available satellite altimeters, including NASA's Jason-1 and Jason-2 satellites, shows Isaac's path through the Gulf. Warm eddies have high heat content and great potential to intensify hurricanes, whereas cold eddies have low heat content and may even cause hurricanes to weaken, as was the case with Hurricane Ivan in 2004. NASA and NOAA satellites continue to provide detailed information on Hurricane Isaac as the storm bears down on the U.S.
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Isaac as it approached Louisiana on Aug. After crossing the southwestern tip of Haiti during the early morning hours of the 25th of August, Isaac paralleled the northern coast of Cuba the following day and moved through the Florida Straits with the center passing about 40 miles (~65 km) south of Key West, Florida on the afternoon of the 26th. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Isaac as it approached Louisiana on Aug. An animation of satellite observations from August 26-28, 2012 shows Tropical Storm Isaac moving past the Florida Keys and into the Gulf of Mexico, nearing landfall in the U.S.


NASA satellites have been providing valuable data to forecasters at the National Hurricane Center watching the development and progression of powerful Tropical Storm Isaac as it heads for landfall. The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Isaac on Aug.
This visible image of Tropical Storm Isaac taken from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite shows the huge extent of the storm, where the eastern-most clouds lie over the Carolinas and the western-most clouds are brushing east Texas. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Isaac on Aug. The NHC expects hurricane conditions in the northern Gulf Coast warning area during the afternoon of Aug.
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite has seen large rainfall rates within Tropical Storm Isaac, and those large rainfall rates and slow movement of the storm will lead to high rainfall totals. An animation of satellite observations from August 25-27, 2012, shows Tropical Storm Isaac moving past Cuba and the Florida Keys and into the eastern Gulf of Mexico.
NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument is an infrared "eye" that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite has been monitoring Tropical Storm Isaac for several days. Rainfall totals could exceed 15 inches in New Orleans with surrounding areas easily receiving 10 inches or more. Isaac has strengthened this afternoon, and made landfall at the strongest part of its developing stage. A category 1 storm, Hurricane Isaac approached the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts on the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. They also warned of a storm surge that could reach 6 to 12 feet (2 to 3.5 meters), depending on the timing of landfall and of local tides. But the heavy rains could also provoke severe flooding, as the parched ground and dried up crops will not necessarily absorb that much water.
Known as the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission, the project will use robotic Global Hawk airplanes to fly over and through storm systems. He's covered myriad environmental, energy, health, weather and scientific issues since 1980.
BatesTodd covers the environment and severe weather for the Asbury Park Press, which he joined on Earth Day in 1985. All rights reserved (About Us).The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of PennLive LLC. The vast, slow-moving hurricane is combing with high tides to produce enormous storm surges as Isaac threatenes New Orleans and coastal areas stretching to Florida’s Gulf coasts.
Wednesday, the hurricane had almost stalled, moving northwest at just 6 mph, about 40 miles southwest of New Orleans. It was about 55 miles south-southeast of the edge of Louisiana, and was expected to make landfall late tonight or just after midnight.
Thursday, Tropical Storm Isaac was still potentially on track to either make landfall in Florida next week or skirt the west coast of the peninsula, in a virtual straight line, close enough to create havoc along mile after mile of coastline, up to Tampa Bay.
Saturday, then continuing northwest across Cuba, but as a tropical storm, not a hurricane, as it heads for the toward the Florida peninsula. Wednesday evening, the center of Tropical Storm Isaac was churning through the Leeward islands, some 40 miles south-southeast of Guadeloupe, with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph, unchanged from 12 hours earlier, but at a distinctly faster clip of 22 mph: the storm has been picking up traveling speed, if not quite wind speeds.
21 to 27, 2012, when Isaac formed and tracked through the northern Caribbean and past south Fla. Using data from the TRMM satellite, NASA created images of rainfall totals generated along Hurricane Isaac's path. During the time, that Isaac formed and made its way through the northern Caribbean and past south Florida. 4, from the thirteenth tropical depression in the Atlantic Ocean, but it seems that wind shear will make Michael struggle to intensify over the next couple of days like his "sister" Tropical Storm Leslie.
Michael is more than seven times smaller than Leslie, as tropical-storm force winds only extend out 35 miles (55 km) from the center, making Michael about 70 miles in diameter. 2, Tropical Depression Isaac's Remnants continue soaking the Ohio Valley and are moving into the Mid-Atlantic, while Kirk became post-tropical in the northern Atlantic, Tropical Storm Leslie is strengthening and headed north. The National Hurricane Center expects Leslie to become a hurricane before reaching Bermuda.
All of these storms were captured in one panoramic image created by NASA from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. The National Hurricane Center forecasts Kirk to move in a northeasterly direction over the next four days on an approach to Ireland.
A few very powerful thunderstorms near Isaac's eye were reaching heights of almost 17km (~10.6 miles). 28 showed a few very powerful thunderstorms near Isaac's eye were reaching heights of almost 10.6 miles. Isaac has a large supply of rain, drawing its power from the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The NHC expects Isaac to produce total rainfall amounts of 7 to 14 inches with possible isolated maximum amounts of 25 inches over much of Louisiana., Mississippi, southwest Alabama, and Arkansas through Friday, Aug. The 3-D image showed a few very powerful thunderstorms near Isaac's eye were reaching heights of almost 17km (~10.6 miles).
29 Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeastern Louisiana in nearly the same location as did Isaac in 2012. Due to Earth’s rotation, the low-level air spirals inward in a counterclockwise direction, while the high-level winds move outward from the eye in a clockwise direction.
For example, he says, this image shows a moonlit "anvil," that's the term used for the highest tops of the storm.
The strength of the storm is reflected in this infrared image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecraft.
While "only" reaching Category 1 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale upon landfall on Aug.
These strong rain bands are forecast to spread gradually to the west tonight across coastal southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi, including the New Orleans metropolitan area. The background of the first image showed TRMM infrared observations that give a sense of the height of the cloud cover the hides the heavy precipitation inside of of the hurricane. EDT, Isaac's maximum sustained winds were still hurricane strength, at 80 mph (130 kmh) as it continues to feed from the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. And one of the reasons why Isaac is not Katrina is the path it took across the Gulf of Mexico and the temperature of the ocean below, which helps to fuel hurricanes. The storm evolved quickly from a Category 3 to a Category 5 event on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale in a matter of nine hours as it drew heat from the Loop Current.
Scientists use the latest satellite measurements of sea-surface height from these and other satellite altimeters to create maps showing the location, direction and speed of currents in the Gulf of Mexico. The storm skirted around the Loop Current, then caught the outer edge of a warm eddy before passing directly over a cold eddy. 26-28, 2012 of Hurricane Isaac's track through the Gulf of Mexico was animated by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. EDT, the National Hurricane Center noted that tropical-storm-force winds were occurring at the mouth of the Mississippi river.
The National Hurricane Center (NHC) is warning that storm surge will be highest from Isaac from southeastern Louisiana to Mississippi, where surge levels are expected between 6 and 12 feet during times of high tide. The National Hurricane Center expects 7 to 14 inches of rain with possible isolated maximum amounts of 20 inches in southeastern Louisiana, southern Mississippi, southern Alabama and the extreme western Florida Panhandle. This visualization was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., using observations from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. AIRS has been providing the National Hurricane Center with valuable temperature data on Isaac's clouds and the surrounding sea surface temperatures, and a time series of data shows that Isaac is consolidating. Hurricane hunters have actually found much stronger winds at flight levels around 5,000 feet over 100 mph. Instead, heavy rain, storm surge, and flooding are the primary concerns across the Gulf coast.
The northern side of the system has filled in with convection (thunderstorms) and an inner eyewall is developing prior to landfall. Hurricane watches and warnings were posted from Intracoastal City, Louisiana, to the Mississippi-Alabama border. The Suomi-NPP satellite also captured this nighttime view of the storm around midnight on August 27-28. The storm was moving northwestward toward the mouth of the Mississippi River at 10 miles (17 kilometers) per hour, with maximum sustained winds of 75 miles (120 kilometers) per hour. Though just a category 1 storm, Isaac’s slow forward motion had the potential to pile up more water in the storm surge.
A principal goal is to learn more about what makes tropical storms intensify into hurricanes.
He's taken graduate-level courses in environmental health, environmental risk assessment and public health. It is expected to pick up strength before striking the Louisiana coastline and New Orleans.
Some reports earlier Monday speculated that Republican leaders might shorten the convention because Isaac is expected to turn into a hurricane and possibly hit the New Orleans area. On the other hand, the storm does appear, for now, to be edging west as the days go by, which suggests that the state could be spared the brunt of the damage. One big difference: Andrew was a Category 5 hurricane, reaching maximum wind speeds of 175 mph. But it isn;t expected to be more than a Category 1 hurricane by the time it strikes Caribbean islands, even as it moves through Cuba.
Isaac's remnants are also struggling, but struggling to get off the land and back into the Atlantic Ocean. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
2, Kirk became Post-tropical storm Kirk Hurricane Kirk's with maximum sustained winds near 50 mph (85 kmh). 2, Ileana had become a post-tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 30 mph (45 kmh). EDT, a visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 showed Tropical Depression Isaac centered over Arkansas and moving into Missouri. As Kirk tracks northward and runs into cooler waters, it will weaken and transition into an extra-tropical storm. The National Hurricane Center expects Leslie to become a hurricane over the weekend of Sept.
Those tall thunderstorms near a hurricane's center release heat and can help a hurricane become more powerful.
NASA's TRMM satellite revealed that some areas within Isaac were dropping rainfall at a rate of 2.75 inches per hour.
30 noted that Isaac had weakened to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 45 mph (75 kmh). According to NHC, on the forecast track, the center of Isaac will continue to move over Louisiana today, over Arkansas on Friday, Aug. 28, 2012, a few hours before Isaac was upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The MISR vector cloud motion retrievals, with a gridded resolution of 11 miles (17.6 kilometers), show this circulation.


The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, Va. 28, Isaac is a slow mover, crawling along at only about six miles (10 kilometers) per hour. 29, 2012, the large storm is still relatively well organized and is producing strong bands of thunderstorms. The storm is expected to weaken to a tropical depression by Thursday night and a post-tropical remnant low-pressure system by Friday. EDT, the MODIS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Hurricane Isaac approaching southeastern Louisiana. EDT in extreme southeastern Louisiana, bringing strong winds and dangerous storm surge along the northern Gulf coast.
The storm's track away from the Gulf's warmest waters has helped to keep Isaac from intensifying rapidly, as Hurricanes Katrina and Rita did in 2005.
NASA's TRMM and Terra satellites captured imagery, and NOAA's GOES-13 satellite provided animations of Isaac's march toward the coast today, Aug. The image was TRMM shows a broad area of moderate (shown in green) to heavy rain (shown in red) wrapping around the southwestern side of the storm with only moderate to light rain (shown in blue) on the opposite side and no heavy rain near the center. The animation shows Isaac is headed for New Orleans, exactly 7 years after hurricane Katrina. That's where a NOAA observing site located at Southwest Pass, Louisiana reported sustained winds of 60 mph (93 kmh) and a gust to 76 mph (122 kmh) at an elevation of 80 feet. 28 from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite shows the huge extent of the storm, where the eastern-most clouds lie over the Carolinas and the western-most clouds are brushing east Texas. EDT, a visible image of Tropical Storm Isaac taken from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite showed the huge extent of the storm, where the eastern-most clouds lie over the Carolinas and the western-most clouds are brushing east Texas. A hurricane warning is in effect for east of Morgan City Louisiana to the Alabama-Florida Border, including Metropolitan New Orleans, Lake Pontchartrain, and Lake Maurepas.
EDT, Tropical Storm Isaac's maximum sustained winds were just under hurricane force, at 70 mph (110 kmh). Alabama's coast may experience surge between 4 and 8 feet, while south-central Louisiana and the Florida panhandle can expect between 3 and 6 feet.
As conditions worsen, isolated tornadoes are possible as with any landfalling tropical cyclone. 24, 25, 26 and 27 showed Isaac's movements through the eastern and central Caribbean Sea, across eastern Cuba and into the Gulf of Mexico. Many areas across southern Mississippi, southern Alabama, and Louisiana could easily see over 15 inches of rain from the system alone. According to the Pentagon, 33,000 National Guard personnel and nearly 100 aircraft available to Governors of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. Todd, a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service, is a member of the Investigations Team. Republican leaders already eliminated almost all of Monday’s convention activities in Tampa because of Isaac tossing off high winds and rain in Florida. If it is, the storm would be striking the Gulf of Mexico’s oil rigs instead, where some 29 percent of American oil production is located.
But the National Hurricane Center is predicting that Isaac will become a hurricane on Friday. All of these storms were captured in one panoramic image created by NASA from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Sunday, Sept.
East of the low pressure center, the frontal boundary was draped over southern West Virginia and into North Carolina.
The National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported at 10 PM CDT (close to the time of the first TRMM image) that Isaac's central pressure had fallen to it's lowest value of 968mb (~28.58 inches of mercury). Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 175 miles (280 km) mainly east through south of the center. The motion of the low clouds is counterclockwise, with the strongest winds in the upper part of the image where the motion of the storm couples with the inflow. This slow movement is forecast to continue over the next 24 to 36 hours, bringing a prolonged threat of flooding to the northern Gulf Coast and south-central United States. The broad area of purple in the image represents cloud-top temperatures colder than minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 52 degrees Celsius) around the center of the storm's circulation.
The heaviest rainfall rates, near 50 mm (2.0 inches) per hour surrounded the center of the storm, causing inland flooding on its slow crawl. A large band of showers and thunderstorms stretched from the Carolinas, west over Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and into Louisiana, wrapping into Isaac's center of circulation when it was centered about 100 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River.
Cloud top temperatures were colder (purple) than –63F (-52C) around the center of circulation and the western quadrant of the storm, and in a large band of thunderstorms east of the center of circulation, over Florida. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
Florida's west coast including Apalachee Bay can expect a storm surge between 1 and 3 feet.
Isaac is a large and powerful cyclone that will bring about significant storm surge, heavy rain, and flooding across the Gulf coast and parts of the southeast for the remainder of this week. The Weather channel reported that 724 homes in the Dominican Republic were damaged and more than 9,600 people were displaced because of Isaac. If you live in a high rise building, then wind speeds could easily match those found in a Category 2 storm. The convention Tuesday will include the roll call vote to nominate Romney for president and prime-time speeches by Romney’s wife, Ann, and New Jersey Gov. This one may also be bi-polar, alternating between tropical storm and hurricane as it goes.
CAT 1 over Miami in 2005 caught them with their pants down power out for weeks people in lines for suplies because they were not ready. Michael is moving toward the north-northwest near 5 mph (7 kmh) and expected to move more toward the north in the next couple of days while not strengthening much, according to the National Hurricane Center. It was speeding to the north 47 mph (76 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 1002 millibars.
Tropical Depression 10E had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh) and was moving to the west-northwest at 17 mph (28 kmh).
It was moving to the north-northwest 12 mph (19 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 970millibars. Because Leslie continues to move in a favorable environment of low wind shear and warm waters, it could become a major hurricane over the weekend of Sept. Rainfall totals of 3 to 6 inches with isolated maximum amounts of 8 inches possible across Arkansas and into southern Missouri through Friday, Aug. Of course the surge can vary according to the shape of the coastline and seafloor, but 12 feet (3.6 meters) is more in line with a Category 3 storm than a 1 and shows how size can be an important factor. A "hot tower" is a tall cumulonimbus cloud that reaches at least to the top of the troposphere, the lowest layer of the atmosphere.
Isaac was a category 1 storm upon landfall with maximum sustained winds of 80 mph (130 kmh). Isaac was moving to the northwest at 6 mph (9 kmh) with a minimum central pressure of 970 millibars.
At the same time, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on Aqua captured infrared data on Isaac's clouds. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 205 miles (335 km) from the center of circulation, making the storm about 410 miles in diameter. Tropical Storm Warnings are in effect from the Alabama-Florida border to the Aucilla River, and Morgan City to Cameron, Louisiana. Isaac is moving northwest at 7 mph (11 kmh) and is expected to continue in that direction for the next day or two, but it's speed is expected to fluctuate.
24, Isaac's strongest convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) appeared all around the center, except in the western quadrant of the storm. Storm surge and flooding is already occurring with the storm as it pushes to the northwest slowly.
Satellite and radar appearance shows a very healthy looking tropical cyclone with convection gathered all around the center of the storm with colder cloud tops. The center of the storm will likely merge back over water and have another landfall later this evening.
But it was a landfall in the most technical sense only, striking a spit of land stretching into the Gulf. The National Hurricane Center noted that the storm could strengthen into a tropical storm on Sept.
Isaac continued bringing heavy rainfall to southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi. Cloud top temperatures were colder than –63F (-52C) around the center of circulation and the western quadrant of the storm, and in a large band of thunderstorms east of the center of circulation, over Florida and parts of Cuba. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from east of High Island, Texas to just west of Cameron, Louisiana.
The National Hurricane Center noted that the center of Isaac will be near or over the Louisiana coast tonight, Aug. Problems will only continue to worsen through the overnight hours and for the next 24 to 48 hours.
Isaac is still intensifying, and the shallow marshy area it made landfall over will not weaken this system fast. Tornado watches are posted central and southern Mississippi in addition to extreme eastern Arkansas.
The threat for dangerous coastal storm surge and inland flooding are expected to continue overnight. NASA's TRMM satellite observed heavy rainfall in this slow moving storm, which leads to higher rainfall totals and flooding. The National Hurricane Center expects Hurricane Isaac should reach the coastline of southeastern Louisiana as early as this evening. 25, when Isaac was affecting Haiti, it appeared more disorganized, and the strongest storms extended from southwestern Haiti into the central Caribbean Sea. The Red Cross has assigned nearly 2,400 disaster workers to states in the storm’s path, delivered more than 500,000 ready-to-eat meals and disaster supplies to affected communities, and put dozens of emergency shelters and vehicles in the region on alert.
A gradual weakening will take place tomorrow, and Isaac will likely become a tropical storm again. Wednesday, with winds of 80 mph, crawling inland, and on track to strike the New Orleans metropolitan area, where the repaired levee system was to be tested again.
Ileana appears as a large area of clouds to the northwest of Tropical Depression 10E on the GOES-13 satellite image. At least 29 deaths are to be blamed by Isaac, and the storm continues to cause problems across the southeastern United States.
Outer bands of thunderstorms have already moved over Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia.
26, AIRS data showed the area of strong convection had increased and the largest area was over the Florida Keys, with bands of strong thunderstorms extending over southeastern Florida and the Bahamas. 27, Isaac's center of circulation appeared more rounded on AIRS imagery, indicating the circulation center was becoming more organized.



High risk assessment training
Emergency safety planning for the deaf community
Natural disaster preparation
Business continuity plan ppt


Comments to “Hurricane isaac preparations”

  1. brodyaga_vechniy writes:
    And survival supplies list for any knives are fantastic more foolproof and they are.
  2. ANAR_SOVETSKI writes:
    And one particular of the most important is a battery.
  3. mia writes:
    Jammed into much less generating it harder to discover stuff when you.