Faraday cage emp,earthquake survival supply list,basic horse first aid kit list#,hurricane disaster plan - Step 3

EMP & Solar Protection Technologies specializes in products that offer EMP Protection from solar storms, electromagnetic disturbances and wireless identity theft. Emergency electric generators may provide the only source of electric power for days, weeks or even months following an EMP Catastrophe.  Protecting portable electric generators should be a national priority for every household and business. YES, to an extent, an old microwave oven may be re-purposed as a Faraday cage against EMP (electro magnetic pulse). A Faraday cage by its very definition does not have to be grounded to reflect or keep out electro-magnetic waves (they normally are not grounded). If a microwave oven is used as an EMP shield (Faraday cage),I would suggest that the cord be cut and removed to prevent it from becoming an antenna. Not a bad idea, but in theory, not necessary given the existing shielding of the chamber itself. Bought some aluminum attic radiant barrier foil a few years back, it’s like heavy duty aluminum foil with threads inside for strength.
I regret to inform you that a microwave oven is only partially effective as a Faraday cage, something you can test for yourself. In any event, there are better methods of do-it-yourself Faraday cage design, as you mention.
I wouldn’t have expected the shielding on a microwave oven to do anything but protect the user from the oven. If I remember correctly, 1) there is no screen over the magnetron’s output port (duh!) and 2) there is high-voltage DC applied to the magnetron.
Go to any old appliance store and buy old single door refrigerator or freezer, , take off the rubber gasket, so that the door metal contacts the main shell, then line the inner walls completely with cardboard or styrofoam, place your electronic on cardboard covered shelves, you can easily store radio’s ,lap tops,etc. A corollary question is this: How would the generator connected to that Automatic Transfer Switch fare in an EMP event?
I suspect what has happened is that the microwave manufacturers have cheapened their units, and provide just enough RF protection to keep your eyeballs from being fried.
Survival blog topics for a life of preparedness and risk awareness; emergency and disaster or threats thereof.
We’ve established that an EMP incident will fry all electronics.  This occurs whether or not they are plugged in or turned on. In fact, with the knowledge of the protection that a Faraday cage can provide you, you may be able to enjoy nearly as comfortable a lifestyle as you did prior to any electromagnetic pulse. Whether or not your electronics are plugged in, how long of an antenna you’ve got on something, what voltage it is, or whether or not they operate with batteries—all non-protected electronics will be affected by an EMP.
Just because your car has rubber tires, it will not be impervious to the effects of an EMP.  Rubber containers are insufficient protection against an EMP. And oh yeah—yes, your Faraday cages DO need to be grounded.  If it’s NOT grounded, then the Faraday cage merely becomes a reflector or an amplifier. Yes, a microwave can act as a Faraday cage, but why in the world would you want to use it for that?  That’s just silly when you can make one simply. Faraday cages do not have to be solid, thus the name “cage” instead of the oft misused term—“box.”  In fact, many of them that you can build yourself or will see on the internet will resemble a bird cage or a very finely meshed chicken coop wire. Also, contrary to what you may see on the internet, a sheet of foil on a box will not protect you. The cages do not have to be solid, but they do have to be constructed continuously without gaps between the protective material.
You can have an instant Faraday cage with a galvanized trash can or a large stock pot like they use in restaurants. The radiation in a microwave makes a CD-ROM look like a spider-web of char and plastic almost instantly. My "um" was supposed to be with attitude in response to your know-it-all attitude which is propagating misinformation here on a blog I enjoy reading.
There is metal in CDs and DVDs, but they aren't at any more risk of damage from an EMP than the layers in a roll of aluminum foil are at risk of fusing together.
I quickly found one source that states that CDs and DVDs are immune to EMPs through Google.
I'm planning on using my old laptop for storage purposes only, and keeping it in either a Faraday container or a galvanized trash can.
Instead of using "thumb drives loaded with all of [your] vital information" I suggest you use optical storage (DVDs or CDs) They're cheaper and since they have no circuitry will withstand an EMP without any protection.
Unfortunately, I have yet to find a quality "shaker flashlight" that provides suitable light. A good idea of something to keep in a Faraday cage is a shake flashlight that powers itself when you shake it. Faraday cages would also be useful if kept in the trunk of your car with flashlight, radio, replacement car stuff, etc., if an EMP struck while you were traveling and not very close to a city or town.
To get a proper Ground the best thing to use is a copper ground wire attached to copper rod 9 feet long pounded into the ground and a 12 inch hole around the ground rod filled with water. 3.Just like you give someone a jump on a battery always make sure one connector is grounded.
4.In Iraq when on the move we always had a wire connected to the ground point and if we could not bury a ground rod we drove over it and then soaked the rod in water. 2.I went back through the US Army's EMP standards and the scariest thing I found is the Army is not sure if what they are doing for EMP will work! If I build a Faraday Cage like the first picture above out of 2x4 frame and a mesh wire fabric, does the bottom have to be mesh too? If you use mesh, you have to use a very fine mesh so that the holes are not big enough to let in microwave-length radiation. What is most important is that whatever you are trying to protect is COMPLETELY enclosed (top, bottom, and all sides), that it is well-grounded, that whatever you are storing inside is insulated from the exterior mesh, and that there are no wires linking something inside with anything outside. In other words, you could store your generator in a faraday cage, but to use it would require you to open the faraday cage in order to plug it in, etc.
The problem with an EMP is the ions that travel at high-speeds, thus creating great power, which will destroy diode substrate layers, thus causing electronics to stop functioning. So, the fact that you can or can not stop radio waves from getting in is not an indicator of whether or not it will work as a Faraday cage.
This concentration of EMP by metal wiring is one reason that most electrical equipment and telephones would be destroyed by the electrical surge. One simple solution is to use battery-operated equipment which has cords or antennas of only 30 inches or less in length. That said, there are some methods which will help to protect circuits from EMP and give you an edge if you must operate ham radios or the like when a nuclear attack occurs.
A new device which may soon be on the market holds promise in allowing electronic equipment to be EMP hardened. At the other end of the scale of EMP resistance are some really sensitive electrical parts.
The only two requirements for protection with a Faraday box are:(1) the equipment inside the box does NOT touch the metal container (plastic, wadded paper, or cardboard can all be used to insulate it from the metal) and (2) the metal shield is continuous without any gaps between pieces or extra-large holes in it. The thickness of the metal shield around the Faraday box isn’t of much concern, either.
Of all of the reasons to prepare, one that we all need to take seriously is the possibility of a catastrophic EMP, or electromagnetic pulse.
To be blunt about it, an EMP, if large enough, would affect the entire planet.  In an instant, civilization as we know it would change as we get swept backward in time by a century or two. So what would life be like following a massive EMP event or episode?  There would be no power, no transportation systems, no communication systems, no banking, no internet, and, no surprise, no food and no water delivery systems.  This would truly be an End of The World As We Know it situation. How would you keep yourself healthy if sanitation systems were no longer functional and medicine could no longer be manufactured.
An electromagnetic pulse could potentially fry the vast majority of all the microchips in the United States. With that introduction, today I would like to introduce you to the Faraday cage, and further, how to build a simple Faraday cage.
More elaborate structures can be custom built from sheet metal but for the home user, why bother?  As a matter of fact, I suspect that wrapping your devices in plain, ordinary, aluminum foil will work as well. Factoid: Faraday cages are named after English scientist Michael Faraday, who invented them in 1836. In my research I read that a microwave oven, new or used,  can be used as an effective Faraday cage.  On the surface, that seems logical since, by design, a microwave oven keeps the energy it creates confined to the interior which likewise, should prevent strong electrical pulses from getting back inside. Granted, cell phones operate at various radio frequencies so while one cell phone may not work, another one will.  Still, with this being so easy to test, why chance it? Aside from calling a cell phone, you can test your homemade Faraday cage by putting a portable radio inside the shield after tuning it to a strong FM station.  If you can hear the FM station while the radio is inside your Faraday cage, then you need to go back to square one to ensure your shield is properly sealed.
I asked my friend George Ure to comment and to offer his perspective on Faraday cages since EMP preparedness is something he covered in-depth on his subscriber site, Peoplenomics ($40 a year but worth it for the technical information on the many topics he covers.).


So, a quick inspection of the EMP failure modes, George offers, is one way to build a list of items to put in your Faraday cage. He also told me some personal research he’s done that seems to indicate that about 90% of cars will continue to operate after an EMP event of moderate size.
The equipment you store in a Faraday cage should encompass those devices that will help you communicate with the world following a devastating loss of the grid. Multiple 2 meter and 440 MHz ham radios (such as the portable Baofengs), again with charging cables and solar power adapters. A laptop computer with a fresh battery, a charger, solar adapter, and all the key software on CD so if you need to bring up a fresh copy of the operating system, you’ll have the product key and then any prepping articles or references you might need. High-capacity USB thumb drive holding  pertinent financial information including past year tax records, scanned copies of birth certificates, passports, marriage licenses, deeds, vehicle registrations and medical records. George also recommends simple insulation for your electronics, so that units do not touch each other, He uses low tech insulation: a combination of cardboard and bubble-wrap works well. Imagine that an EMP is a tidal wave.  If it approaches a full reservoir (electricity and current) it can keep going. There are hints of this in the article Electromagnetic Pulse Protection by Jerry Emanuelson. Should a massive EMP occur, stores won’t be open, credit cards won’t work, and the gas you have in your car may be all the gas you’ll ever have for months or even possibly years.
Will the DIY Faraday cage work?  It is speculation to say for sure.  My own research plus my limited understanding of electronics tells me it will, but this premise will remain unproven until an actual EMP event occurs.
The bottom line is that I hope a catastrophic EMP never happens.  But if it does, I want to be ready to fend for myself without electronics. I would like to acknowledge my George Ure for his assistance with this article.  His research and first hand experience with Faraday cages, along with his perspective, is appreciated. If you enjoyed this article, consider voting for Backdoor Survival daily at Top Prepper Websites!  In addition, SUBSCRIBE to email updates  and receive a free, downloadable copy of my e-book The Emergency Food Buyer’s Guide. SunJack Portable Solar Charger:  SunJack® helps mobile users stay charged on the go anywhere the sun shines. Included are broccoli, green peas, tomato chunks, spinach, green beans, and zucchini pieces—fantastic in soups, stews, or even in a refreshing salad. You can read about these and other healing essential oils in 20 All Purpose Remedies Using Essential Oils or other articles on this archive page: Interested in Learning About Essential Oils. For an even broader selection of oils consider this Spark Naturals Health and Wellness Kit which includes a total of 10 oils and blends, nicely packaged on a tin that is perfect for your first aid kit.  And note that with any purchase from Spark Naturals you will enjoy a 10% discount by using code BACKDOORSURVIVAL at checkout. How to Build a Simple Faraday Cage for EMP Survival by Gaye Levy first appeared on Backdoor Survival. With Instructables you can share what you make with the world, and tap into an ever-growing community of creative experts.
They do, but this is certainly a lower cost option, especially if you have an old ammo can available.
As long as the holes in the screen are smaller than the wavelength of the frequencies you are trying to protect against, screen works just as well as a solid piece of metal. In the case of a nuclear detonation, the electromagnetic pulse consists of a continuous frequency spectrum.
Since the holes of the screen mesh of a microwave oven are small compared to the wavelength of the microwave itself, little radiation can leak out.
I do know that cell phones operate at lower frequencies, however I would assume that a microwave shielding would also block lower frequencies by default – since the microwave frequencies themselves are higher and require smaller holes in the screen. Since EMP is nothing more than a high energy RF pulse, any Faraday cage which will shield you from EMP will also shield you from RF.
I am also somewhat surprised that the microwave shielding seems to be apparently somewhat ‘tuned’ or restricted? What I found is that supposedly, a microwave is permitted to radiate up 0.25 Watts of power. Kellene, I was responding to the part where Alt says "since they have no circuitry will withstand an EMP without any protection". Alt, you could have a hand in a microwave for 2 seconds and not have any noticable effects. By the way, something that I haven't discussed as of yet is that there's actually 3 levels of EMP strike that we can expect. Yes, as long as whatever is being protected is completely surrounded with good, conductive metal that is then grounded properly. The reason I am asking is that I am looking to buy and old truck (late '60's to mid '70's) specifly for the reason that it would function in the event of an EMP attack or solar flare. If I had a laptop in the garbage can, would it need additional protection, such as wrapped in mesh wire?
If you have an old car that doesn't have any electronic ignition or any solid state parts would it still fry? Wrapping the devices in aluminum foil - could not call the phone, keying one radio did not reach the other.
The letters spell burnt out computers and other electrical systems and perhaps even a return to the dark ages if it were to mark the beginning of a nuclear war.
In such a case, the gamma radiation released during the flash cycle of the weapon would react with the upper layer of the earth’s atmosphere and strip electrons free from the air molecules, producing electromagnetic radiation similar to broad-band radio waves (10 kHz-100 MHz) in the process. It’s believed that the electrical surge of the EMP from such an explosion would be strong enough to knock out much of the civilian electrical equipment over the whole country.
In the levels created by a nuclear weapon, it would not pose a health hazard to plants, animals, or man PROVIDED it isn’t concentrated. It isn’t that the equipment itself is really all that sensitive, but that the surge would be so concentrated that nothing working on low levels of electricity would survive. This short stretch of metal puts the device within the troughs of the nuclear-generated EMP wave and will keep the equipment from getting a damaging concentration of electrons.
The trick is that it must REALLY be hardened from the real thing, not just EMP-proof on paper. This includes large electric motors, vacuum tube equipment, electrical generators, trans- formers, relays, and the like. These include IC circuits, microwave transistors, and Field Effect Transistors (FET’s).
Despite what you may have read or heard, these boxes do NOT have to be air- tight due to the long wave length of EMP; boxes can be made of wire screen or other porous metal. Grounding a Faraday box is NOT necessary and in some cases actually may be less than ideal. Care must also be taken that the door is covered with foil AND electrically connected to the shield with a wire and screws or some similar set up.
These shelters are covered inside with metal foil and have metal screens which cover all air vents and are connected to the metal foil. In practice, the entire system is not grounded in the traditional electrical wiring sense of actually making contact to the earth at some point in its circuitry. The very prudent may wish to buy spare electronic ignition parts and keep them a car truck (perhaps inside a Faraday box). Unfortunately, a little-known Federal dictum prohibits the NRC from requiring power plants to withstand the effects of a nuclear war.
This is a frequent topic in many post-apocalyptic novels and something that most of us are aware of, even if we do not completely understand the science. The problem, he points out, is that with an EMP, the grid is likely to fail, and with that, power transformers will likely fail, along with the supervisory control and data acquisition systems (SCADA) control systems for railroads, power, water, and other utility distribution.
Still, the ultimate prepping device would be a metal garbage can which has the top cover sealed to the bottom of the can with aluminized duct tape such as the type found at Amazon, Lowes, Home Depot and other hardware stores.
If the reservoir is empty (no juice), the tidal wave loses energy navigating the reservoir. This price, by the way, is less than my local Ace Hardware store.  Also available in this larger size 20 Gallon size. The SunJack® is able to fully charge its internal battery pack in about 5 hours of direct sunlight, or directly power any USB device. I earn a small commission from purchases made when you begin your Amazon shopping experience here.
This is an easy tool for finding products that people are ‘wishing” for and in this way you know what the top products are.  All you need to do is select the category from the left hand side of the screen.
A Faraday cage is an enclosure formed by conducting material or by a mesh of such material. Most of the energy is distributed throughout the lower frequencies between 3 Hz and 30 kHz.
There are also mesh screens on the sides of the oven cavity, one to protect the oven light while allowing it to shine into the cavity, the other to permit ventilation.


The article states that most of the energy will occur below 30 KHz and while I suspect this frequency may depend on the actual type of EMP involved, this is still close enough to the AM band to use an AM radio for testing. The microwave oven does apparently restrict these frequencies, but the attenuation itself in dB is unclear. Mesh wire will generally not work unless it is very small mesh (chicken coop wire wouldn't work). I would guess that if it doesn't have a an electronic ignition it would start assuming that it is all original factory parts under the hood. And should that wire be grounded to the garbage can (which is connected to an outside ground rod)? If you put a cage in your basement, would you have to run a wire to the outside to ground it? So yes, if it's an EMP that has caused your power outage, then you should be fine after its impact. Not sure if it will work but I think it will be the best I will be able to do without a full retro fit of my home. Below is a detailed write up about EMP (Electro-Magnetic Pulse) and how to protect yourself from it. Adding to the problems is the fact that its effects are hard to predict; even electronics designers have to test their equipment in powerful EMP simulators before they can be sure it is really capable of with standing the effect. These electrons would follow the earth’s magnetic field and quickly circle toward the ground where they would be finally dampened. Protecting electrical equipment is simple if it can be unplugged from AC outlets, phone systems, or long antennas. These design elements can eliminate the chance an EMP surge from power lines or long antennas damaging your equipment. The Ovonic threshold device is a solid-state switch capable of quickly opening a path to ground when a circuit receives a massive surge of EMP. These might even survive a massive surge of EMP and would likely to survive if a few of the above precautions were taking in their design and deployment. If you have electrical equipment with such com- ponents, it must be very well protected if it is to survive EMP. If the object placed in the box is insulated from the inside surface of the box, it will not be effected by the EMP traveling around the outside metal surface of the box. Ideally the floor is then covered with a false floor of wood or with heavy carpeting to insulate everything and everyone inside from the shield (and EMP). According to sources working at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, cars have proven to be resistant to EMP in actual tests using nuclear weapons as well as during more recent tests (with newer cars) with the US Military’s EMP simulators. Discovering that you have one of the few cars knocked out would not be a good way to start the onset of terrorist attack or nuclear war.
But it seems probable that many vehicles WILL be working following the start of a nuclear war even if no precautions have been taken with them. This means that, in the event of a nuclear war, many nuclear reactors’ control systems might will be damaged by an EMP surge. Handy while hiking, traveling, or simply keeping in touch with your partner while out shopping.
When the sun isn’t shining, users can still energize their devices from the powerful SunJack® battery, which holds enough charge to power up to 4 iPhones.
The 7-weather channels are pre-programmed and numbered from 1-7, you can easily and conveniently tune into the stations by adjusting the switch.  Note that not all emergency radios include the NOAA weather band so this is an important feature.
Mythbusters built one that was quite effective, blocking radios, cell phone signal, etc, out of a simple box of brass mesh.
If the radio is too close to the wall of the can newspaper is not enough to prevent the charge from arcing on antenna or input jack. A microwave oven’s very design is to enclose the electro-magnetic radiation of microwaves, and keep them from getting out. However the first effects of nuclear detonation are the very-high-frequency pulses, in the microwave range, and can work their way into Faraday cages if there are cracks, seams, or vents. Simply tune the radio to the strongest local station and put it in whatever you are testing. First of all, allow me to dispel some myths about Faraday cages—and boy, howdy, there are a LOT of them. It’s the substrate layers of the diodes and transistors that make them susceptible to a magnetic pulse attack. Since Faraday cages are not fool proof, depending on the strength of the pulse, I would recommend burying such containers 2 feet under the ground, storing survival electrical and battery items.
Once you understand EMP, you can take a few simple precautions to protect yourself and equipment from it.
Thus, strategies based on using lightning arrestors or lightning-rod grounding techniques are destined to failure in protecting equipment from EMP. Another useful strategy is to use grounding wires for each separate instrument which is coupled into a system so that EMP has more paths to take in grounding itself. Use of this or a similar device would assure survival of equipment during a massive surge of electricity. It is important to note that cars are NOT 100 percent EMP proof; some cars will most certainly be effected, especially those with fiberglass bodies or located near large stretches of metal.
One area of concern are explosives connected to electrical discharge wiring or designed to be set off by other electric devices. In such a case, the core-cooling controls might become inoperable and a core melt down and breaching of the containment vessel by radioactive materials into the surrounding area might well result.
The only requirements are that the material be conductive, and that any holes be smaller than the wavelength of the desired radiation.
We all know that commercial companies don’t put anything more than what they have to for fear of reducing their profit, so it would reasonable to assume microwave ovens are probably between 40 and 50 dB of shielding. You are simply left with the sudden consequences and whatever preparedness you have on hand.  So, other than your preparedness supplies, your new best friend may be a Faraday cage. It is also advisable that the cage be grounded and very thick, if full blockage of radiation is desired. I just did this with my microwave and while the signal did get rather noisy, it could still be heard, even with the door closed. Its not bad, but it just isn’t enough to fulling attenuate the AM station to the point that it is inaudible. Nuclear bursts close to the ground are dampened by the earth so that EMP effects are more or less confined to the region of the blast and heat wave.
It could become concentrated by metal girders, large stretches of wiring (including telephone lines), long antennas, or similar set ups. Even though the plane, high over the earth, isn’t grounded it will sustain little damage. EMP, like nuclear blasts and fallout, can be survived if you have the know how and take a few precautions before hand. But EMP becomes more pronounced and wide spread as the size and altitude of a nuclear blast is increased since the ground; of these two, altitude is the quickest way to produce greater EMP effects.
Ammunition, mines, grenades and the like in large quantities might be prone to damage or explosion by EMP, but in general aren’t all that sensitive to EMP. As a nuclear device is exploded higher up, the earth soaks up fewer of the free electrons produced before they can travel some distance. Consequently, storage of equipment in Faraday boxes on wooden shelves or the like does NOT require that everything be grounded.
Most effective, good old aluminum foil and ammo cans, even with the rubber seal, although you do need to make sure that any metal like an antenna does not touch the foil or the steel of the can. You can make your “cage” as small or as large as you’d like.  It wouldn’t be out of the question to continuously line a basement storage room or hole in the ground with copper mesh wire and a grounding rod. Bottom line, with an appropriately constructed Faraday cage, you can likely protect that which is inside from the electromagnetic attack of an EMP incident or solar flare, thus preserving the function of all that is contained therein.
They are then put in the microwave.  The one Peep that wasn’t put in the microwave met his untimely death, while the others were still intact.
For a little bit of a science lesson on the workings of a Faraday cage, check out this YouTube link. The science professor is EXCELLENT.  Note though that he does say that a car is a Faraday cage, however, I want to reiterate that it is NOT sufficient to extinguish the effects of an EMP attack. Chicken coop wire would work, but only if you double or even triple layered it as the opening are too large.



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