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Some of the cookies we use on our site are essential for different parts of the site to work. Emergency response organisations in Northamptonshire are asking people to consider making a New Year’s resolution to sign up as a volunteer. The Northamptonshire Emergency Response Corps (NERC) is a community organisation that brings together the various agencies involved in emergency response in the county, and volunteers play a vital role. NERC’s members include the Northamptonshire 4X4 Response Team, Northampton Emergency Aid Team and Northants Search and Rescue, which are all staffed by volunteers.
One of these volunteers is Vicky Davey, who joined the NERC a year ago after reading a local newspaper article about its work. She said: “I pictured the numerous times our county has flooded and the many families stranded with no help in sight. Volunteers like Vicky take part in training exercises to test emergency plans and will be called upon in times of a real emergency situation such as flooding or large-scale evacuation.
Cllr Andre Gonzalez de Savage, county council cabinet member for strategic infrastructure, economic growth and public protection, said: “The development of The Northamptonshire Emergency Response Corps should provide reassurance to people across the county that we are continually testing and improving our emergency response plans should the worst happen. Volunteers don’t need to commit a minimum amount of time a month, they just need to be on-call when they can.
The Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act (the Act) includes the provision that the Minister, MCSCS may formulate emergency plans respecting types of emergencies other than those arising in connection with nuclear facilities. The PERP describes the arrangements and measures that may be taken to safeguard the health, safety, welfare and property of the people of Ontario affected by an emergency.
While the focus of this plan is on emergency response, it also recognizes the important link to prevention, mitigation, preparedness (plans, training, public education, exercises, and emergency information), and recovery, as proactive components that are critical elements in any emergency response. Emergency Management Ontario (EMO) is the organization charged with responsibility to monitor, coordinate, and assist with the promotion, development, implementation and maintenance of emergency management programs in Ontario. This edition of the PERP supersedes and replaces the Provincial Emergency Response Plan, dated December 2005. An emergency is a situation or an impending situation that constitutes a danger of major proportions that could result in serious harm to persons or substantial damage to property and that is caused by the forces of nature, a disease or other health risk, an accident, or an act whether intentional or otherwise. Emergency management consists of organized programs and activities taken to deal with actual or potential emergencies or disasters. Prevention refers to the actions taken to prevent the emergency itself and can greatly diminish the response and recovery activities required for certain emergencies. Preparedness refers to those measures taken prior to the emergency or disaster to ensure an effective response. Emergency Management Ontario (EMO) is the overall provincial emergency management organization, and is responsible for the promotion, development, implementation and maintenance of effective emergency management programs throughout Ontario, and for the coordination of these programs with the federal government.
The PERP is the plan that is used to coordinate overall provincial emergency response and outlines how EMO and the ministries respond to widespread or large-scale emergencies. Emergencies vary in intensity and complexity depending on factors such as time of occurrence, weather conditions, severity of impact, nature of the affected infrastructure and buildings, and demographics. Occasionally, emergencies arise that overwhelm the capacity of community authorities to completely carry out the emergency response operations necessary to save lives and protect property. If necessary, the province can declare an emergency and directly control the commitment and application of provincial resources, and possibly those of affected and unaffected communities.
Provincial response support can be provided to the Government of Canada in the event of a national emergency. The aim of the PERP is to establish a framework for a systematic, coordinated and effective emergency response by the Province of Ontario to safeguard the health, safety, welfare and property of its citizens, as well as to protect the environment and economy of the area affected by an emergency, excluding nuclear emergencies.
The federal government, through Public Safety Canada (PS) is responsible for the national emergency response system. The Province has exclusive jurisdiction for matters of property and civil rights in the province and for all matters that affect the public health, safety and environment of the province, under this Act.
The federal government has also made arrangements with First Nations and with the province concerning emergency preparedness and response activities in Ontario under which the province agrees to provide assistance in emergency preparedness and response to First Nations communities. The Ontario government is responsible for protecting public health and safety, property and the environment within its borders. The Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services (Minister, MCSCS) formulates the PERP under authority of subsection 8.1 of the Act. References in this plan to the Minister, MCSCS will refer to those powers vested in the Solicitor General by the Act2. Pursuant to section 6 of the Act, ministers of the crown presiding over a ministry of the Government of Ontario and agencies, boards, commissions or other branches of government designated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council shall formulate emergency plans for the type of emergency assigned by the Lieutenant Governor in Council. Declaration of a provincial emergency may also be made by the Premier of Ontario, if the urgency of the situation requires that such a declaration be made immediately. Ministers’ emergency plans shall authorize Crown employees to take action under the emergency plans where an emergency exists but has not yet been declared to exist (section 9(a) of the Act). Ministers of the Crown and Crown employees are protected from personal liability for doing any act or neglecting to do any act in good faith in the implementation or intended implementation of emergency plans such as the PERP (subsection 11 (1) of the Act). Pursuant to section 14 of the Act, ministry emergency plans shall conform to the standards set out in regulations under the Act.
Pursuant to subsection 6(1) of the Act, the Lieutenant Governor in Council may assign to a minister, the responsibility for the formulation of an emergency response plan to address a specific type of emergency. Ontario municipalities possess legislated responsibilities to establish emergency management programs under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Coordination of provincial response to emergencies that occur in the North and in unorganized territories is the responsibility of the ministry to which the type of emergency that has occurred has been assigned through the OIC.
Provincial ministries that are assigned a type of emergency by the OIC will produce emergency response plans according to their assigned type of emergency, to enable the Province of Ontario to respond effectively to each emergency.
These plans identify issues arising from provincial emergencies that require a broader response than a primary ministry’s response capabilities, and outline how inter-ministerial issues will be coordinated.
Denotes a plan which is in the process of development, is subject to change as a result of internal or external review, and is also still subject to various approvals.
Denotes a plan that has been extensively reviewed, which may or may not have been exercised or evaluated, and has yet to receive final approvals.
Denotes a plan which has completed the review process, has likely been exercised and evaluated, and has received all of the necessary approvals.
The Chief, EMO is responsible for monitoring, coordinating, and assisting with the promotion, development, maintenance, and, through the PEOC, the implementation of these plans.
Under certain circumstances, it may be necessary to enhance the coordination of provincial emergency response by implementing provisions from this plan.
If the urgency of the situation requires that declaration of a provincial emergency be made immediately such a declaration may also be made by the Premier.
2.3 It is not possible, without the risk of serious delay, to ascertain whether the resources normally available can be relied upon. Therefore, an emergency could be declared if operational information indicates that existing government resources and legislative powers are insufficient to address the emergency. The process leading to a provincial declaration of emergency will vary depending on the situation. When a provincial declaration of emergency is made, the Premier (or minister designated to exercise the powers conferred on the Premier by the Act,) will ensure that the federal government is informed. Once a provincial declaration of emergency has been made the LGIC has the power to make emergency orders and may delegate these powers to a Minister or to the Deputy Minister of Emergency Planning and Management. A Minister to whom powers have been delegated may delegate any of his or her powers to the Deputy Minister of Emergency Planning and Management. These orders are only made if they are necessary and essential, would alleviate harm or damage, and are a reasonable alternative to other measures. The decision-maker must determine whether it is reasonable to believe that the order will alleviate harm or damage.
The decision-maker must believe the order represents a reasonable alternative to other measures that are available to address the emergency. This part of the test requires the consideration of options that may be available before an emergency order is made.
The order must apply only to the areas where it is necessary and should be effective only for as long as necessary.
Orders generally prevail over all Ontario statutes and regulations, with limited exceptions (E.g. It is important to note that this criterion does not require that all other alternatives be attempted prior to making an emergency order. An order made by the LGIC or a Minister is revoked 14 days after it is made unless revoked sooner. A provincial emergency declaration may include the Province of Ontario in its entirety or any portion or area thereof. During an emergency, the Premier, or a Minister to whom the Premier delegates the responsibility, is required to regularly report to the public with respect to the emergency. The Premier is required to submit a report in respect of the emergency in the Assembly within 120 days after the termination of an emergency.
The Deputy Minister of Emergency Planning and Management is required to make a report to the Premier in respect of any orders that he made, within 90 days after the termination of an emergency, for the Premier to include in his report. The basic structure established for the response to a provincial emergency, following the IMS model, is illustrated in Figure 4.1. The LGIC and the Premier of Ontario provide overall direction to the management of the emergency response.
The mandate of the Cabinet Committee on Emergency Management (CCEM) is to ensure that the province is prepared to address emergency situations and assume other responsibilities, as Cabinet deems appropriate. The PEOC provides overall coordination of the provincial response, based on the strategic direction from the Deputy Minister and CCEM. During all stages of response, EMO (through the Deputy Minister of Emergency Planning and Management) will ensure that both the Cabinet Committee on Emergency Management (CCEM) is kept fully informed of the emergency situation and receive current assessments and updates on which to base operational decisions. The PEOC coordinates with the primary ministry to ensure that there is no duplication of effort, and that the operation runs smoothly.
City officials are inviting residents to join its 100-member Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) when state-certified trainers hold a series of free CERT classes for up to 60 participants this fall.
Hoboken's CERT volunteers have been recognized as "Community Preparedness Heroes" by FEMA, and CERT coordinator Lou Casciano was honored as a Community Preparedness and Resilience "Champion of Change" by the White House. The city graduated its fourth CERT class in February, bringing the total number of trained volunteers to 100. The goal of the program is for emergency personnel to train members of neighborhoods, community organizations, or workplaces in basic response skills. If a disastrous event overwhelms or delays the community's professional response, CERT members can assist others by applying the basic response and organizational skills that they learned during training.
The final drill and exercise will take place at the Hoboken Volunteer Ambulance Corps at a date to be determined.
Participants must attend every module of training as well as participate in the final emergency simulation exercise in order to receive certification as a fully trained CERT Team member. In 2007, Fort Bend County Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and a group of dedicated volunteers formed our first CERT Team. CERT training is designed to prepare you to help yourself, your family and your neighbors in the event of an anticipated disruptions and potential hazards before and following a disaster.
If you are interested in volunteering or would like more information, please contact our office at (281) 342-6185 or email.
The goal is to be “going from a climate of fear to a culture of preparedness,” as Janet Neopolitano has said. This is a community program of the Volunteer Services division of Fire and Rescue, which works closely with Office of Emergency Management.
Volunteers must take a free class for 28 hours, after which they get a certificate from FEMA.  Classes are held four times per year.


How Was This Publicized to Recruit Volunteers?Information is available on the County website and the program is also heavily publicized through word-of-mouth.
ChallengesThere is a little bit of physicality involved and CPR involves getting onto someone’s chest, but there the only requirement is a willingness to learn. Incidents such as abductions, missing persons, natural disasters and other community emergencies have the potential to tax the resources of a primary response agency (Police, Fire, EMS, etc).
OVERTa€™s ability to adapt to different situations provides its partnered agencies with a valuable resource without adding logistic or financial burden. CERT members use a fire extinguisher to put out a small fire at a spring Countywide training exercise.
In a CERT training module, members come across an injured man and must assess his injuries and consider rescue options.
They are taught skills such as putting out small fires and even basic search and rescue from emergency responders and receive certification.
On Saturday, more than 120 trained volunteers of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) from throughout San Diego County gathered for a six-hour exercise.
For the team building exercise, the team members were paired up with another person and they were both blindfolded and led through an obstacle course by a third non-blindfolded team member, said DeMarco. The San Diego County Office of Emergency Services helped DeMarco run the event at the San Diego Fire-Rescue Training Facility. Among those participating in Saturday’s exercise were teams from San Diego, San Miguel, San Marcos, Lakeside, Poway, Carlsbad, Encinitas, Rancho Santa Fe, Coronado, National City, Vista, Escondido, Solana Beach, Deer Springs, Del Mar and Oceanside.
Two countywide exercises are planned every year in addition to each community team’s training schedule. To find out more about the program and to see if there are any opportunities to join in your community, visit the County’s CERT page. Email UpdatesEnter your email address to sign up for free updates or to access your preferences. I wanted to step up and help but I didn’t know how, so I went along to a volunteers evening and it all went from there. Their roles could include to staff reception centres, to deliver  supplies to those involved in a recovery effort or to answer calls on a helpline. People can be prepared by planning an escape route from their home in the event of an emergency, and having a grab bag packed and ready. They will also receive regular training, information and support to maintain their skills and knowledge. Volunteers were recruited and a series of classes were held this fall to train them in the rudiments of emergency response.
The Province of Ontario Emergency Response Plan, also referred to as the Provincial Emergency Response Plan (PERP), fulfils the above provision of the Act.
It sets out the basic mechanisms, organizational structures, responsibilities, and procedures to guide Ministers and their staff when involved in a coordinated provincial response to emergencies in Ontario. EMO was also charged with the responsibility for writing the PERP, and it is an avenue through which to fulfil its mandate for emergency management across the province. These situations could threaten public safety, public health, the environment, property, critical infrastructure and economic stability. It can also greatly diminish the response and recovery activities required for certain emergencies and may result in a long-term, cost-effective reduction of risk. Preparedness measures include plans, training, exercises, public education, alerting and notification systems, procedures, organization, infrastructure protection, and standards. The aim of these measures is to ensure that a controlled, coordinated, and effective response is quickly undertaken at the outset of the emergency to minimize its impact on public safety. The aim of these measures is to assist individuals, businesses and communities to return to a state of normalcy.
In most instances, for emergencies outside the capability of the individual, families or businesses, communities1 manage emergencies. On these occasions, direct provincial government assistance may be necessary to support emergency response activities. In the event of a national emergency, the federal government will implement its emergency response plans and, under the following legislation, will consult with the Province of Ontario.
The federal Governor in Council can declare a public welfare emergency, which includes an emergency caused by a real or imminent accident or pollution resulting in danger to life or property, social disruption or breakdown in the flow of essential goods and services, so serious as to be a national emergency.
While a declaration of a public welfare emergency is in effect, the Governor in Council may make necessary orders or regulations that are necessary to deal with the emergency. The Governor in Council must consult the provinces that are affected by the emergency before issuing a declaration of public welfare emergency. This assistance is provided on request from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) or a First Nations community. The following sections outline the legislative and regulatory framework associated with this responsibility.
1990, ChapterE.9, (hereafter referred to as the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act or the Act). In that respect, this plan may be used for all types of emergencies other than those arising in connection with nuclear facilities. Such emergency declaration is subject to the criteria set out in the legislation governing emergency declarations. The current Order in Council (OIC) assigning responsibilities to ministers is included as Annex A. The Act also defines the relationship between the Province and municipalities during actual emergencies. Pursuant to section 3 of the Act, municipalities shall formulate plans to respond to emergencies and adopt these plans by by-law. Municipal plans should reflect the coordination of services provided by all levels of local government in a given community. Pursuant to section 5 of the Act, the plans of lower-tier municipalities in an upper-tier municipality, excluding a county, shall conform to the plan of their upper-tier municipality. Municipal emergency plans shall authorize municipal employees to take action under emergency plans where an emergency exists but has not yet been declared to exist (subsection 9.
Members of council and municipal employees are protected from personal liability for doing any act or neglecting to do any act in good faith in the implementation or intended implementation of emergency plans such as the PERP (subsection 11 (1) of the Act). Counties, with the consent of their municipalities, may coordinate the emergency plans for their municipalities under subsection 3. Pursuant to section 14 of the Act, municipal emergency response plans shall conform to the standards set by the Minister, MCSCS.
MNDM is only responsible for abandoned mine emergencies and for providing support to the primary ministries for all other types of incidents. These provisions also apply generally to agencies, boards and commissions (ABCs) designated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council5. It is accepted that a nuclear emergency may nevertheless require the simultaneous implementation of the PERP to address many non-nuclear outcomes of such an emergency. Such emergency management programs include emergency plans, and to that end the PERP outlines general coordination requirements that all provincial ministries and municipalities should incorporate, as appropriate, into their emergency plans.
In such a case, all other ministries would be expected to act in a supporting role, within their competencies. This would include, for example, provision for participation in emergency training and exercises. EMO will monitor, coordinate and assist with the development and maintenance of such plans. It describes both Ontario’s structure and processes for managing emergency responses, as well as the structure to be used by EMO in coordinating a provincial emergency response. These MERPs will be expected to support provincial emergency response, and be supporting and complementary to the PERP. Pursuant to section 8 of the EMCPA, the approval authority for the Provincial Emergency Response Plan (PERP) is the Minister, MCSCS.
The PERP shall be fully reviewed, amended and brought forward for Ministerial approval at least once every four years.
Regulations mandate that the members of each Ministry Action Group (MAG) and Municipal Emergency Control Group (MECG) complete the annual training that is required by the Chief, EMO.
The Chief, EMO may also provide advice and assistance to ministers and municipalities for the development of their emergency management training programs.
It will be risk-based and include a range of exercise activities of varying degrees of complexity and interaction.
An Interim Plan is considered a working document and would be used to respond to an actual emergency. Depending on how plan development and approvals proceed, it may not always be necessary to have an Interim Plan. The Provincial Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (HIRA) Report, which provides a methodology for analyzing hazards and assesses the province’s vulnerability to potential hazards, forms the basis for the PERP. A disaster can occur with little or no warning and can cause an extreme emergency condition in any area of the province. Emergencies vary in scope and intensity, from small, localized incidents, with minimal damage, to multi-jurisdictional disasters with extensive devastation and loss of life. Communities have capabilities, plans and procedures to provide for the safety of their citizens in a time of emergency. The Province of Ontario has emergency resources and expertise that may be used to satisfy emergency response needs that are beyond the capabilities of communities. The province may provide emergency response assistance that is supplemental to, and not a substitute for, community resources. Provincial assistance to communities is not dependent on a formal declaration of emergency by a community, except where prior agreements are in place. Should the emergency exceed community capabilities, the LGIC or the Premier may declare a provincial emergency and the premier or a designated minister may coordinate all emergency responses. Should the situation exceed the provincial capability the Premier or a designated minister may request emergency response assistance from the federal government. Mitigating hazards that pose further threat to life, property, the economy and the environment. Resources from the province or even the federal government may also be required, depending upon the nature and severity of the incident.
Should an emergency require a coordinated provincial response or should a ministry require assistance in responding to the emergency, the necessary provisions of the PERP will be implemented.
All affected levels of government should remain fully engaged in the emergency response despite the involvement or declaration by other levels of government. Accordingly, it should seldom be necessary to declare a provincial or federal emergency even though resources from these jurisdictions will frequently be provided in support of an emergency declared by a municipality or a First Nation.
In some cases, prior warning may come from outside organizations that have access to scientific methods of predicting floods, forest fires, and severe weather. In these situations, each community would be expected to respond using its resources in accordance with its own plan. If they are well coordinated, the plans of a regional municipality and its area municipalities should be mutually supporting.
Counties may also, with the consent of their constituent municipalities, coordinate planning and response activities with those lower-tiers.
However, the provision of resources alone from the provincial or federal government would not in itself necessitate any change in jurisdictional arrangements. These plans, governing the provision of necessary services, together with the procedures by which Crown employees and other persons are to respond, constitute the initial provincial emergency response.
These MERPs should identify the resources and the procedures that are necessary to recognize, contain and then resolve the cause of any emergency that falls within their assigned type of emergency.


Management of the emergency in accordance with the provincial Incident Management System (IMS). When appropriate, actions to be taken upon the declaration of an emergency by the LGIC or the Premier.
This does not imply that ministries should not deal with municipalities, First Nations communities or the federal government within their ministries’ emergency response plans, but that the overall coordinating authority for plans is the Chief, EMO. This plan may also be implemented in conjunction with other emergency response plans that address specific hazards.
Providing a copy of their most current emergency plans to the Chief, EMO under subsection 6.2 of the Act. Requesting assistance if necessary, in accordance with this PERP and established guidelines. Supporting a coordinated provincial emergency response in accordance with this plan and the ministry emergency response plan for the types of emergencies assigned to other ministers.
Supporting emergency response operations of First Nations communities, the Nishnawbe-Aski Nation, or in other federal jurisdictions, if requested. EMO is available to assist in the development of such plans for First Nations, and to assist in emergency response operations pursuant to agreement with Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). Communities should advise the PEOC when an emergency occurs or if an emergency seems imminent. This sharing of emergency information will facilitate a more rapid emergency response and will reduce planning time.
The emergency requires immediate action to prevent, reduce or mitigate the dangers posed by the emergency. The declaration notification is passed to the PEOC, which will in turn inform the Regional Director, PS, of the emergency declaration.
This declaration can be renewed for one further period of 14 days given that it meets the test of the declared emergency.
The orders must only apply to the areas where it is necessary and should be effective for only as long as is necessary. For example, if the matter could be addressed by an order under the Health Protection and Promotion Act (HPPA), the availability of the HPPA order should be considered to determine whether an emergency order is a reasonable alternative to address the emergency.
In other words, it does not require that an emergency order is the only alternative available.
If the Assembly is not in session, the Premier is required to submit the report within 7 days of the Assembly reconvening. Organizational structures for incident management, including the provision for common response functions - Command, Operations, Planning, Logistics, and Finance and Administration.
Develop the overall provincial emergency management response strategy of the Government of Ontario. Conduct high-level briefings and discussions of strategic issues with appropriate ministries. In this role, the Deputy Minister will ensure information and decisions are relayed between the CCEM and the PEOC, and vice versa in a timely and effective manner. The PEOC is responsible for implementing and monitoring the operational strategy decided on by the Cabinet Committee on Emergency Management.
While the primary ministry executes its ministry emergency response plan for the type of emergency assigned to it based on the existing emergency, the PEOC will operate as the provincial coordinator, with a focus on coordination issues outside of the scope of the primary ministry. CERT members are then integrated into Hoboken's emergency response capability, city officials said. Upon completion of the training, each participant will be issued a CERT Member Emergency Kit to maintain for future deployments.
In August 2011 when a tornado devastated Chili, WI, Erin, with the Chili Fire Department, helped victims of the disaster right after the tornado. The purpose and mission of the CERT Team is to aid and support the people of Fort Bend County preparing for, responding to, recovering from, or mitigating the effects of natural and Man-Made disasters.
Volunteers are trained on methods that terrorists use and how to mitigate the situation if terrorism should occur. It is for this reason that OVERT has been developed a€“ to allow for easy and efficient integration of community volunteers.
Community teams meet on their own time for skill refresher training and twice a year, they gather with other community teams to train together.
DeMarco said the twice annual countywide trainings are invaluable for CERT programs because they provide the opportunity to do regular refresher trainings with members. It is an umbrella emergency response plan for the coordination of provincial response to any emergency. It also serves as the foundation for the development and coordination of provincial plans with those of municipalities, First Nations, and the Government of Canada and its agencies. Prevention measures are broadly classified as either structural or non-structural and include capital improvements, regulations, building codes and public education programs. Similar to prevention, mitigation measures are broadly classified as either structural or non-structural and include capital improvements, regulations, building codes and public education programs.
When an emergency occurs, the immediate focus of operations is on meeting the emergency needs of people, saving lives, and protecting property and the environment. Recovery measures include environmental clean-up, return of evacuees, emergency financial assistance, and critical incident stress counseling. They do this either as a matter of routine by emergency responders (including police, fire and Emergency Medical Service (EMS)), or by implementing their emergency response plan, with or without declaring an emergency. The orders or regulations made by the Governor in Council should not unduly impair the ability of the province to take measures, under provincial legislation, for dealing with the emergency. However, where the effects of a public welfare emergency are confined to one province, the federal government will not issue a declaration of a public welfare emergency or take other steps unless the Lieutenant Governor of the province has indicated to the federal Governor in Council that the emergency exceeds the capacity of the province to deal with it.
Services provided by both upper and lower tiers, as well as municipal boards, should be included.
0.3(2) (b) of the Act, during a declared emergency the Premier, by order, may require any municipality to provide necessary assistance to an emergency area outside the jurisdiction of said municipality, and may also direct and control the provision of such assistance. If an emergency that has not been identified within the OIC occurs, MCSCS will be the primary ministry. The concepts and procedures for use by provincial and municipal officials in their respective emergency response plans are outlined in this plan. Those that have been assigned, under the OIC, the responsibility for a type of emergency, are expected to ensure that their emergency response plans are consistent with the PERP and coordinated in so far as possible with the emergency plans of other ministries.
In addition, all Agencies, Boards and Commissions (ABCs) and any other branch of government would also be expected to provide a supporting role within their competencies.
It is designed to integrate the efforts and resources of the Province of Ontario, municipalities, the private sector, and other nongovernmental organizations. Additionally, MAGs and MECGs must conduct an annual practice exercise for a simulated emergency incident in order to evaluate the respective ministry and municipal emergency response plan and their own procedures. A copy of the Provincial Glossary of Terms is included as Annex D, with a list of Acronyms at Appendix 1. Duplication and confusion can be kept to a minimum and the ability to conduct comprehensive, coordinated operations may be enhanced through the implementation of multi-disciplined actions that may be carried out irrespective of the hazard involved. They can escalate more rapidly than individuals or community response organizations are able to handle. In responding to an emergency, a ministry may implement provisions from its ministry emergency response plan formulated for the type of emergency assigned to it. Where reliable prediction is possible, action can be taken before the onset of an emergency.
Figure 3.1 depicts the normal two-way flow of emergency information between communities, ministries, other organizations and the PEOC. Therefore, an emergency could be declared if operational information indicates that immediate action is needed because of danger to individuals or property. Rather, it merely requires that the decision-maker give consideration to the reasonableness of an emergency order in relation to other options that may be available. The CCEM is the only Cabinet Committee for which membership has been specified by portfolio. The following day, disaster psychology, as well as terrorism and CERT will be the topics of training. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy,, Terms of Service, and Ad Choices, and Mobile Privacy Policy & Terms of Service.
They are community members, perhaps even your neighbors, who want to serve their community by learning basic emergency skills that will help themselves, their families, and others in a crisis. Additionally, the training gives CERT members from different communities an opportunity to work together and learn from each other in addition to the instructors.
The Community Emergency Response Team program provides disaster preparedness training to volunteers on topics that include fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. If you continue to use this site without changing your settings we will assume you are happy to use the cookies we deliver.
Libros said on Wednesday that the class stemmed from the experience of the October 2011 snowstorm that left Canton along with much of the rest of the state without power. This effort may last from a few hours to several days or longer, depending on the situation. Recovery activities usually begin almost as soon as the response begins and continue after the response activities cease. Provincial resources deployed to deal with a significant hazardous materials incident could fall under the Provincial Counter-Terrorism Plan (PCTP)7 and the Supporting Plan for Terrorism Consequence Management (SPTCM)8, should there be a subsequent determination that the incident is terrorist related. This plan includes planning assumptions, roles and responsibilities, concept of operations, and plan maintenance instructions.
Ministry plans generally require their Minister’s approval whereas municipal non-nuclear plans require passage of a by-law by council.
In many cases, these multi-disciplined actions parallel the normal day-to-day responsibilities and functions of provincial ministries and communities.
Assistance may expand to the provision of personnel, equipment and other resources to assist a community in dealing with the cause of an emergency. Through the weeks after the tornado struck, Erin organized a disaster relief command at the Chili Town Hall  where she had the basic necessities for victims. CERT members must undergo 20 hours of training to receive certification, and purchase personal protective equipment to participate. The town's emergency shelter was open for nine days and Libros said having a community emergency response team was recommended in an assessment of the town's handling of that crisis."We needed trained volunteers," Libros said. As response activities begin to taper off, the operational focus begins to shift from response to recovery. The plan description should include the term Approved Plan and the date approved for implementation, e.g. She also organized many volunteers to help with debris pick up and was able to get oil for the chainsaws, machinery for the pick-up and even a mobile home donated for someone who lost their home in the tornado. We can’t prevent earthquakes and hurricanes, but this program empowers citizens to take action for themselves and their families rather than call 911 for response when the system is overwhelmed. He said the class covered the basics of emergency medical care, putting out fires and how volunteers can cope with the emotional stress of helping victims of a disaster.The group that has just graduated will meet monthly for more training and Libros said the intent is to repeat the just-completed class so more people can participate in the team.



Radio emergency broadcast system
Survive the blackout game


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