Emergency response plan template,radio warning system,what safety precautions should you take during a hurricane - Step 1

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This includes, but is not limited to: Flash (also requires the Adobe Flash Player), navigation, video, image galleries, etc. Current practices in nursing home emergency planning, governmental roles in evacuating special needs citizens, standards in emergency response, and accepted methods for. Nursing home emergency procedures are important steps outlined to deal with any possible situation. In the wake of some very serious industrial accidents around the world, many countries recognized the need for hazard-specific emergency preparedness and response. Emergency response plans aim to provide responders with critical information about products and operational processes. The Ontario Mass Evacuation Plan is a supporting plan to the Provincial Emergency Response Plan (PERP). For more information on the legislative framework and authorities, see the PERP available on the EMO website. This plan supports the agreement between the Governments of Ontario and Canada (through the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada) to provide emergency response support to First Nation communities in the province. An EMO planning team in consultation with non-governmental organizations, provincial and federal partners developed the plan. This plan is meant to be used to respond to a request for a partial or complete evacuation from one or more communities to one or more host communities. Provincial coordination will involve the evacuating community, host communities, relevant Ontario ministries, federal departments, non-governmental organizations, and others, as required.
This plan is for Ontario’s far north, encompassing municipalities, unorganized territories2 and First Nation communities.
This is an overarching plan for carrying out mass evacuations and as such, many aspects are general in nature4. The Far North of Ontario spans the width of the province, from Manitoba in the west, to James Bay and Quebec in the east. The far north is subject to several hazards covered under Ontario’s Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment. The geography of the far north may complicate evacuations or efforts to manage or suppress the hazard. Maintain family and community unity, which is integral to maintaining community cohesion and supports. Potential threats to the communities and emergency responders are critical in determining the urgency of the evacuation and for planning resource mobilization. Real-time threat assessment should be ongoing and coordinated among partners, particularly ministries with relevant OIC responsibilities and the community(ies) at risk. An OIC ministry or the PEOC may recommend evacuation, or that it is safe to return, based on a real-time threat assessment. The availability, duration, type, and location of host community facilities affect planning for the evacuation. Consideration should be given to maintaining the readiness of host communities for future hosting. Evacuating communities should identify Community Evacuation Liaisons for each host community. The decision to deploy is typically based on requests from impacted communities, the mandate of the organization deploying staff, and staff member’s level of expertise.
Depending on the scale and complexity of the operation, a senior provincial official may be deployed to coordinate the provincial response and to liaise with community and other deployed officials.
Situational awareness requires continuous coordination to help collect, collate, evaluate, and disseminate information.
When planning for the return of evacuees, the number and location of host communities, and the distance to evacuated communities are key planning considerations. Roles and responsibilities may pertain to transportation hubs, host communities, support from ministries or the federal government, or responsibilities of evacuating communities. Determine the financial and legislative roles and responsibilities for the evacuation and comply with applicable policies, agreements, procedures, etc.
Emergency information needs to be coordinated among the affected communities, province, and federal government.
Once it has been decided that a community needs complete or partial evacuation, the parties involved must establish who the evacuees are, where the host locations are, and what the means of evacuation will be. Following the judgement of the authorized entity that it is safe for evacuees to return, the order of return and the methods of transportation must be established using an inclusive planning process that involves affected communities, provincial and federal partners, and other partners (i.e.
Real-time threat assessment is a critical component of evacuation operations and should be ongoing. All responders involved in managing the hazard or participating in the evacuation must regularly communicate situational awareness information to those conducting real-time threat assessments and must report a changing situation as soon as feasible. OIC ministries are responsible for assessing the threat for the types of emergencies they have been assigned. EMO is responsible for real-time threat assessments for hazards that have not been assigned to an OIC ministry. The PEOC is responsible for assessing the threat based on the real-time threat assessment and characteristics of the community(ies) or region under threat. During routine monitoring, the PEOC duty officer performs the function of real-time threat assessment. OIC ministries routinely monitor conditions in the province according to their assigned type of emergency. Uncertainty in real-time threat assessment is unavoidable, which is why persons with appropriate knowledge of the threat causing the emergency should be involved in the assessment.
During emergencies, the PEOC links with the local community and the OIC ministry acting as provincial lead to coordinate real-time threat assessment information. Emergency managers must understand the makeup of the population who are to be evacuated before they can make key decisions about transportation modes, route selections, hosting destinations, and the many other elements of an evacuation.
Medevac is used for those individuals receiving home care or residing in a health-care facility in the evacuating community that qualify for medical transfer as per the Ambulance Act (evacuation by emergency medical services (EMS) or Ornge).
This stage is typically orchestrated through the existing health procedures used in the community.
This includes persons with disabilities, seniors, children, pregnant women, and those with medical conditions.
Among these, some require attendant care, which means both the caregiver and the Stage 1 evacuee they care for should be on the Stage 1 evacuation list. The designation of evacuees into the different stages will be determined by the First Nation Chief and Council, Head of Council, or appointed person, with the assistance of the on-site health care organization. Different types of hazards may dictate variations in the criteria for these categories (e.g.
The decision to evacuate a community is the responsibility of the First Nation Chief, Head of Council, or appointed person.
For First Nations communities, AANDC and PS approve federal assistance to support an evacuation.
The urgency of an evacuation is determined based on the immediacy of the threat to the community (life, safety, health, and welfare), the resilience of the community, and (depending on the nature of the threat) the availability of resources for evacuation or shelter-in-place10. Evacuations may take place prior to (pre-emptive), during, or after an incident has occurred.
Given adequate warning about a hazard, adequate resources, and the likelihood of the threat actually impacting a community, it is advisable to conduct pre-emptive evacuations. If adequate resources are not available to conduct a pre-emptive evacuation, it may still be possible and necessary to carry out an evacuation even while a threat is already affecting a community. If recommending enhanced monitoring or activation of the PEOC, consider what positions must be staffed to conduct the evacuation. Alert PS of the situation and advise them if Government of Canada support may be required to assist. Establish a regular information cycle and contact for evacuating communities, host communities, and other parties assisting with the evacuation. Consider requesting additional host communities stand-by to receive evacuees if the situation appears likely to escalate rapidly. Establish the PEOC Command, and if it is an area or unified command, consider including additional organizations in the command meetings to better inform and coordinate the response. Determine financial accountabilities in consultation with partners and communicate the information. Determine at the outset of the operations which organization will be responsible for information management and the manner in which information will be shared.
Initiating media contacts or directing the appropriate position to do this according to established plans and procedures (e.g. Adopting an extended operational cycle in which extra positions are staffed beyond the normal working day.
Alerting other emergency responders in the province, including non-governmental organizations, that they may be requested to provide assistance.
Marshalling transportation resources, including the recall of deployed resources in preparation for redeployment. Collecting and analyzing the data necessary to fully understand the potential impact and threat. Weather, resource availability, and the scale of an incident can significantly affect the time required to mobilize resources.
Emergency information is primarily the community’s responsibility, but may be supplemented by the province according to the provisions of the Provincial Emergency Information Plan. Communications between the field and the PEOC, between the PEOC and partners, and within the PEOC is critical.
The PEOC (or other EOC) may request deployments to fulfil specific incident management functions, as needed (e.g.
Where the scale of the incident, evacuation timeline, or availability of staff prevents the physical deployment of staff, relevant incident management functions may be performed remotely using available technology. Information technology in the far north is not universally accessible and may be further compromised by the nature of the emergency. All partners (but with specific reference to PEOC) should recognize the potential limitations to information technology in these regions of the province.
The priorities for evacuation will be determined by the Chief and Council (for a First Nation), the Head of Council (for a municipality), or an authorized entity. Transportation planning for the evacuation will be undertaken by a joint planning team as described in Annex 7. The evacuating community should identify community evacuation liaisons at each of the host community sites to support evacuees. If an evacuation involves a First Nation community, the JEMS Service Level Evacuation Standards provides a sample flight manifest. Service Level Evacuation Standards11 are in place for hosting First Nations community members in the event of an evacuation.
Through the PEOC, EMO works with the evacuating First Nation to identify a host community or communities for its evacuees. The selection and preparation of host facilities should be driven by the needs of the evacuees.
Another key consideration is the availability of personnel and other resources to support the host facilities. Potential conflicts with the longer-term use of accommodations in the host community should be considered and mitigated if possible (e.g.
The PEOC should begin contingency planning with partners for longer-term evacuations if it appears likely that evacuees will be displaced from their community for longer than the period discussed below. When evacuees are members of a First Nation, the use of any facility that was used as, or could evoke comparisons to, residential schools should be avoided. Communities considering acting as a host community during an evacuation should identify emergency shelter facilities. Short-Term Basic Shelter Services: for a period of 1-14 days, in arenas, gymnasiums, recreation halls, etc.
Special Accommodations: to address the requirements of medically vulnerable individuals or those with special needs. Host communities may be limited in the types of accommodations that they are able to provide.
Planning for hosting evacuees builds on information already available (typically from the manifest). Host communities are responsible for registering evacuees that are entering into their care. Registration records should only be shared with organizations providing services to the evacuees (e.g. Before the return of evacuees, the evacuated community should be in a safe and ready state. Services have resumed and are sufficient to support returning evacuees – for example, power, water, sanitation, security, food and essential supplies, and medical services. If a community was completely evacuated it may be advisable to begin the return of evacuees with essential workers to restart systems and assess the readiness of the community to receive other returning evacuees. Once approval has been given for all or a part of the population to return home, community leaders, working with community evacuation liaisons, will develop priorities and manifests for the return flights. Ground transportation arrangements may be made by the host community or the provincial government. The evacuated community will take the lead for communicating re-entry procedures, with assistance from partners as required. What media sources can evacuees use for the most up-to-date information on re-entry procedures? Following a regional evacuation, multiple communities may decide at the same time that they are ready to return evacuees. The PEOC and partners will commence demobilization as host communities are cleared of evacuees. The Quick Reference Guide is a condensed version of the Ontario Mass Evacuation Plan Part 1: Far North. Life is unsure, we may have to face unexpected circumstances in many fields of life for whom we may not be prepared.
It is significant to find key steps to overcome the emergency and include them in your emergency response plan. When ERP is compiled, it will specify precise steps to carry on the intact plan in motion as quickly and effectively as possible. The initial actions are crucial in handling of emergency conditions, so risk assessment is very important to discover the potential of emergency scenario.
Though it is unfeasible to be fully prepared for emergency situations but it is crucial having an emergency response plan. Related DocumentsWeekly Lesson Plan TemplateEarlier I have shared two different versions of Lesson Plan Template that allows teachers to plan their courses at an high level (overview). Grocery List TemplateThis weekend I used this template to plan my weekend grocery shopping list. Lease Agreement TemplateAfter preparing Rental Agreement Template and receiving feedback from valued visitors, I have now attempted to create a Lease Agreement Template.


Holders of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Response Plan Implementing Plan for the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station are responsible for keeping it updated by incorporating amendments, which may be issued from time to time. This public document is administered by the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services of Ontario.
The Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act (EMCPA) requires and authorizes the formulation of the plan. Procedures : Based on all of the above plans, procedures are developed for the various emergency centres to be set up and for the various operational functions required. It is necessary that everyone involved in the preparation and implementation of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Response Plan employ common terminology. An accident in which the effects, both actual and potential, are expected to be confined within the boundaries of the nuclear facility. An accident in which the effects are so localized that their impact can be satisfactorily dealt with by local emergency response personnel (police, fire, etc.) with possibly some outside technical assistance.
A declaration of a provincial emergency may also be made by the Premier if the urgency of the situation requires that it be made immediately. The emergency requires immediate action to prevent, reduce or mitigate the dangers posed by the emergency.
The Legislative Assembly may by resolution extend the length of an emergency for additional periods of no more than 28 days, for as many times as required. An emergency declaration made by the Premier lapses after 72 hours, unless confirmed by the LGIC. The PNERP Master Plan sets out the principles, concepts, organization, responsibilities, policies, functions and interrelationships, which will govern all nuclear and radiological emergency management in Ontario. The PNERP Implementing Plans apply the principles, concepts and policies contained in the Master Plan, in order to provide detailed guidance and direction for dealing with a specific nuclear or radiological emergency. Separate response plans have been developed to deal with accidents at the Pickering, Darlington and Bruce Power nuclear generating stations as well as for the Chalk River Laboratories and the Fermi 2 installation in Monroe, Michigan. This Plan provides generic guidance on dealing with radiological emergencies caused by sources not covered by the other Implementing Plans.
Provincial ministries, agencies, boards and commissions shall develop their own plans and procedures to fulfil the responsibilities as outlined in the appendices to Annex I.
The emergency plans and procedures of nuclear installations deal with their onsite responsibilities. This is a plan jointly developed and adopted by the federal governments of Canada and the United States for early notification, coordination of activities and provision of mutual assistance between the two countries in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency in North America with transboundary implications. Health Canada administers the Federal Nuclear Emergency Plan (FNEP), which can be activated to manage and coordinate federal response activities for a nuclear emergency requiring a multi-jurisdictional or multi-departmental off-site response. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), an independent agency of the Government of Canada, is the national regulator for the nuclear industry in Canada which includes any actions taken in response to the radiological or nuclear aspects of an emergency. In the event of a nuclear emergency, the federal government will liaise with the provinces and territories as well as with neighbouring countries and the international community as outlined in Appendix 19 to Annex I.
The regulation of nuclear energy has been deemed to be a matter of national concern that goes beyond local or provincial interests.
The province has exclusive jurisdiction for matters of property and civil rights in the province and for all matters that affect the public health, safety and environment of the province. Pursuant to section 6, the federal Governor in Council can declare a public welfare emergency, which includes an emergency caused by a real or imminent accident, pollution resulting in danger to life or property, social disruption or breakdown in the flow of essential goods and services, so serious as to be a national emergency. Pursuant to section 14, the Governor in Council must consult the provinces that are affected by the emergency before issuing a declaration of public welfare emergency. Pursuant to section 8, while a declaration of a public welfare emergency is in effect, the Governor in Council may make necessary orders or regulations that are necessary to deal with the emergency. This act assigns responsibility to the Minister of Public Safety for the coordination of emergency management activities including the development and implementation of federal civil emergency plans in cooperation with other levels of government and the private sector. The Commission is given exceptional powers including the power to make any order in an emergency that it considers necessary to protect the environment or the health and safety of persons or to maintain national security and compliance with Canada’s international obligations. Compensation to third parties for injury or damage caused by a nuclear incident, as defined in the Nuclear Liability and Compensation Act, would be assessed and paid under the provisions of this Act.
This legislation governs the transportation of dangerous goods (including radioactive goods) and the accidental release of ionizing radiation exceeding limits established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act. The provincial government has jurisdiction over public health and safety, property and the environment within its borders. The legislative authority for emergency management, planning and response for Ontario is the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act (EMCPA). The PNERP is formulated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council (LGIC) under section 8 of the EMCPA.
The LGIC assigns responsibilities for formulating emergency plans in respect of specific types of emergencies to ministers (section 6 of the EMCPA). Pursuant to section 3 (4) of the EMCPA, the designated municipalities shall formulate plans to deal with the off-site consequences of nuclear emergencies caused by the corresponding nuclear installation (Annex A). These plans should also contain, where applicable, arrangements for the provision of services and assistance by county departments, local police services, fire services, EMS, hospitals and local boards. As required by section 8 of the EMCPA, municipal nuclear emergency response plans shall conform to the PNERP and be subject to the approval of the Solicitor General (this function is fulfilled by the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services). As required by section 5 of the EMCPA, plans of lower-tier municipalities shall conform to the plans of their upper tier municipality. Pursuant to sections 2(3) and 3(4) of the EMCPA, every municipality, in developing their emergency management program, must identify and assess the various hazards and risks to public safety that could give rise to emergencies. Where the upper tier municipality is not the designated municipality under this PNERP it may, with the consent of its designated municipalities, coordinate the nuclear emergency plans for those municipalities. In the event of a declared emergency, the LGIC or the Premier may order a municipality to provide support or assistance to designated municipalities or to affected municipalities. Support and assistance may include, but shall not be limited to, personnel, equipment, services and material. The responsibilities of provincial ministries, municipalities, federal departments and organizations, nuclear installations and their operators for nuclear emergency response and for the purposes of implementing this plan, are given in Annex I. The Province shall support and coordinate the response to the off-site consequences of a nuclear emergency and may, where warranted and appropriate, issue operational directives and, emergency orders (in the event of a declared emergency) under the EMCPA.
Even though nuclear facilities are designed and operated according to stringent safety standards, emergency preparedness and response must operate on the basis that mechanical failure, human error, extreme natural events or hostile action can lead to nuclear or radiological emergencies. All plans should be so devised as to be able to deal effectively with a broad range of possible emergencies. An appropriate balance should be struck between risk and cost when assessing the level of emergency preparedness required. Exposure to radiation should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) within the context of the risks and costs of such avoidance. As much preparedness as is practicable should be done in advance to enable a rapid, effective and efficient response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. Preparedness should include a program of public education for people who might be affected, to inform them of plans, and to help them cope with a nuclear emergency.
As far as is practicable, operational measures (especially alerting and notification systems) and protective measures should be devised and implemented to avoid significant radiation exposure. A policy of truth and openness should be followed in providing information to the public and media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Remaining indoors with doors and windows closed and external ventilation turned off or reduced.
Measures which protect against external contamination and radiation exposure (as a result of a radioactive cloud or plume or deposited contamination).
Measures which protect the food chain from radioactive contamination, and prevent the ingestion of contaminated food and water. Banning consumption and export of locally produced milk, meat, produce, and milk-and meat-producing animals. The main challenge that Ontario faces in this area would arise from an emergency at a nuclear installation4. Taking the above into consideration, as well as the various types of nuclear accidents that could potentially occur in Ontario, a basic offsite effect has been selected to serve as the main basis for nuclear emergency management.
Detailed planning and preparedness shall be carried out in Ontario for dealing effectively with the basic offsite effect of a nuclear installation accident.
An accident or event could occur which could result in a more severe offsite effect, though the probability of such an occurrence is very low.
Detailed planning and preparedness will establish an effective basis to deal with an emergency caused by any type of nuclear installation accident.
The zone around the nuclear installation within which detailed planning and preparedness shall be carried out for measures against exposure to a radioactive plume. A larger zone within which it is necessary to plan and prepare measures to prevent ingestion of radioactive material. Processes and procedures were quickly mandated and implemented, gradually morphing into a standardized emergency response plan (ERP). Essentially, every plan should provide emergency personnel with enough information to facilitate a timely and effective response. For example, emergency response personnel will want to know how much product is stored within a vessel or pipeline and the physical properties of the product. In addition, this plan references the Service Level Evacuation Standards1 developed by the Joint Emergency Management Steering (JEMS) Committee. Updates to the plan will be undertaken as required based on lessons learned from exercises and incident responses.
It is a provincial coordination plan outlining how Ontario would coordinate its response and collaborate with federal and municipal governments, First Nations, non-governmental organizations, and ministry partners. It is not intended for internal evacuations of one part of a community to another part of the same community.
This plan does not replace a community’s own emergency response plans, which should contain provisions for evacuations if they consider evacuations likely. A detailed action plan that addresses the specific scenario, hazard, and threat will still be required.
Evacuations are most frequently caused by forest fires and flooding (most often from spring break-up along the James Bay coast).
Communities in the far north may be located significant distances from communities with road access or from regional centres where services may be available (e.g.
Damage to property or the environment may also trigger an evacuation if it poses a risk to the safety, health, and welfare of people.
It also dictates what level of activation, and how many and what type of resources will be required for the evacuation.
If the evacuation is for one or a few communities, planning may be restricted to movements within the same general geographic area. Therefore, planning should include post-hosting needs, such as financial reconciliation, demobilization support, and reports on issues to be resolved before hosting evacuees in the future.
This allows the incident management team, and all partners, to take informed, effective and consistent actions in a timely manner.
However, as the level of activation increases, the PEOC duty officer transfers this function to a technical specialist or team, if available. These ministries have processes in place for transferring the responsibility for real-time threat assessment to specialists within their ministry when required. All activities and efforts should be focused on moving these people from the at-risk area to places of safety in a timely manner. This list should contain the names of persons needed to restart systems that must be in place before evacuees can return home (e.g. If an authorized entity decides on a partial or complete community evacuation, the community should declare an emergency.
A pre-emptive evacuation may be undertaken when it is clear that if delayed, conditions (weather or other hazard) would impede evacuation.
Evacuations of this nature are done when life safety is at extreme risk and a rescue becomes essential.
For example, evacuations of large populations to one or more host communities may require logistics support to secure modes of transportation from a receiving aerodrome or transportation hub to the host community.
Communities are encouraged to make the decision to evacuate as soon as a significant or imminent threat is identified. In widespread evacuations, emergency information may need to be coordinated amongst all involved partners. To assist with streamlining communications, an operational cycle should be established and communicated by the PEOC to partners so they know when they are expected to provide updates on the situation from their perspective. Partners should have back-up technologies available, particularly for their deployed staff. It is preferable to host community members together, even if it means hosting them farther away from their home community.
Evacuation liaisons represent the needs of evacuees when attending meetings with the host community and other agencies.
If the information is not collected on the manifest, registration services can collect and provide this more detailed information. Depending on the scale of the incident, and the numbers and locations of persons to be evacuated, the needs may exceed the capacity of available resources. The Standards provide guidance on allowable expenditures, hosting arrangements, health services, emergency social services, etc. If requested, the PEOC could assist other communities in identifying potential host communities. It is worth noting that community health services and hospitals in the host community may experience an increased demand for their services. Representatives from provincial (through the PEOC) and federal organizations may be available to assist a host community in providing services to evacuees. It is generally understood that time of year may affect the host community’s ability to provide accommodations during an evacuation. This allows the host community to better coordinate services and seek reimbursement for expenses incurred due to hosting. The recommendation and the decision to return should be based on the results of the ongoing real-time threat assessment, plus a determination that the home community is ready to support the returning evacuees.
This may involve the coordination of an advance team that is given sufficient time and other resources to return the community to a pre-evacuation state.
It is critical that at the end of an evacuation, there is a full accounting of the operation in the form of after-action and financial reports.
This will enable you to prepare your ERP consistent to the conditions which you are dealing with and performance goals. The Major Organization Plans (as per Figure I on page ii) should be consistent with the requirements under these implementing plans. These plans are based on, and should be consistent with the PNERP and with the Provincial Implementing Plans.
The terminology contained in the Glossary, Annex K, should be used for this purpose by all concerned.
In a nuclear emergency, therefore, the Province will take the leading role in managing the off-site response.
The Province may issue operational directives1 and emergency orders (in the event of a declared emergency), where warranted and appropriate, as further detailed in this Plan.


Such a hazard will usually be caused by an accident, malfunction, or loss of control involving radioactive material.
It is not possible, without the risk of serious delay, to ascertain whether the resources normally available can be relied upon.
This declaration can be renewed for one further period of 14 days, as long as it meets the test of the declared emergency. These are combined in one document since many of the features will be the same for all such potential emergencies. It would be applicable to accidents at nuclear establishments, transportation (of radioactive goods) accidents, satellite (containing radioactive material) re-entry, radiological dispersal devices (RDD), radiological devices (RD) and nuclear weapon detonation. Pursuant to sections 3 and 8 of the EMCPA, municipal nuclear emergency response plans prepared by the designated municipalities in respect of nuclear installation emergencies (Annex A) shall conform to this PNERP and, shall address the agreed-to responsibilities outlined in Appendices 15 and 16 to Annex I. Municipalities in close proximity to, or with nuclear establishments within their boundaries should include, in their emergency response plans, the measures they may need to take to deal with a radiological accident.
Other municipalities which have a radiological incident identified as one of their potential risks within their Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment should include, within their municipal emergency response plans, the measures they may be required to undertake to deal with such an emergency (see PNERP Implementing Plan for Other Radiological Emergencies).
All municipal emergency response plans should provide for the development of plans and procedures involving local boards (defined pursuant to the Municipal Act, 2001, S.O. They should also include the measures required to discharge offsite responsibilities in accordance with the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Regulations and with the responsibilities outlined in Appendix 13 to Annex I. This plan contains an Ontario Annex, which provides for liaison with Ontario, the provision of federal assistance, and provisions for obtaining international assistance, should any be requested by Ontario. In the event of a radiological or nuclear emergency, the CNSC will monitor and evaluate the on-site response of the licensee, or in the case of an event with no identified licensee, the CNSC will oversee and regulate the response activities of the responding organizations to ensure compliance with the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Regulations, and ensure the health, safety and security of the response staff, the public and the environment, as well as maintain compliance with Canada’s international obligations. The federal government will also manage nuclear liability issues and coordinate Canada’s response, should Canadians be affected by a nuclear emergency in a foreign country. Therefore, the federal government maintains exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of nuclear energy in Canada. However, where the emergency is confined to one province, the Governor in Council may only issue a declaration of public welfare emergency or take other steps when the Lieutenant Governor of the province has indicated to the federal Governor in Council that the emergency exceeds the capacity of the province to deal with it. The orders or regulations made by the Governor in Council should not unduly impair the ability of the province to take measures, under provincial legislation, for dealing with the emergency. Federal authorities also coordinate or support the provision of assistance to a province during or after a provincial emergency.
Once a provincial declaration of emergency has been made (see section 1.3 above), the LGIC has the power to make emergency orders and may delegate these powers to a Minister or to the Commissioner of Emergency Management (CEM)2. Emergency orders are made only if they are necessary and essential, and they would alleviate harm and damage and are a reasonable alternative to other measures. Emergency orders must only apply to those areas where they are necessary and should be in effect only for as long as necessary. During an emergency, the Premier or a minister (delegated) is required to regularly report to the public with respect to the emergency. The Premier is required to submit a report in respect of the emergency to the Assembly within 120 days following the termination of the emergency.
Pursuant to section 11(1) of the EMCPA, Ministers of the Crown, Crown employees, members of municipal councils and municipal employees are protected from personal liability for doing any act done in good faith under the Act or pursuant to an Order made under the Act.
Emergency plans authorize crown and municipal employees to take action under those plans where an emergency exists but has not yet been declared to exist (section 9 of the EMCPA).
In the case of those assigned to a position, implementation should also be the responsibility of any substitute, alternate or the person next in line of authority if the permanent incumbent of that position is absent or otherwise unable to take the necessary action.
In addition to the obligation of Cabinet to formulate this plan, nuclear and radiological emergencies are assigned to the Minister of Community Safety & Correctional Services.
Pursuant to section 3(4) of the EMCPA, municipalities have been designated to prepare plans in respect of nuclear emergencies.
Appendices 15 & 16 to Annex I address the main responsibilities of the designated municipalities. Municipalities in close proximity to, or with nuclear establishments within their boundaries, should include in their emergency response plans the measures they may need to take to deal with the off-site consequences of a radiological accident. Other municipalities which have a radiological incident identified as one of their potential risks, within their Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment (pursuant to Section 2 (3) of the EMCPA), should include, within their municipal emergency response plans, the measures they may need to undertake to deal with such an emergency (see PNERP Implementing Plan for Other Radiological Emergencies). The Solicitor General may make such alterations as considered necessary for the purpose of coordinating the plan with the Province’s plan. Where a municipality identifies radiological risks (as per PNERP Implementing Plan for Other Radiological Emergencies), the emergency plan for that municipality must include provisions to deal with such an emergency.
Once radioactive material enters the body, internal contamination decreases in accordance with the radioactive decay and biological elimination of such material. If there is a risk of radioiodine entering the body, the thyroid’s capacity to absorb it can be reduced or eliminated by taking a compound of stable iodine before, or even shortly after, the radioiodine enters the body. However, because resources are not available to make full preparations for dealing with all possible events, a judicious choice must be made to select the optimum basis for emergency management. Formal risk analysis of nuclear reactor accidents shows that there is generally an inverse relationship between the probability of occurrence of an accident and the severity of its likely consequences. The main hazard to people would be from external exposure to, and inhalation of radionuclides. The aim of this is to ensure, to the extent possible, that no person offsite will be exposed to intolerable levels5 of radiation as a result of such an accident.
Radiation doses could be high (greater than 250 mSv [25 rem] for the most exposed person at the facility boundary).
Environmental contamination could be quantitatively significant in both extent and duration. This requires planning and preparedness to enable detection and assessment of environmental contamination, protection of the food chain from contamination, and prevention of the ingestion of contaminated food and water. Priority evacuations, if necessary, shall be undertaken within this area because of its proximity to the source of the potential hazard.
Nuclear plants, oil and natural gas refineries, and chemical and fertilizer processing facilities, are examples of activities that require emergency response plans for unique hazards. Detailed information is vital and ultimately can determine whether the response is a success or failure. As many of the communities in the far north are First Nations, coordination with the federal government is crucial. Two communities falling within the focus area have road access (Mishkeegogamang and Pickle Lake) and there is a rail link to one municipality (Moosonee). However, the evacuation of multiple communities due to an area-wide emergency is likely to require out-of-area movements for hosting, particularly when the goal is to keep families and communities together. The size and demographics of the population are significant factors in determining how to conduct an evacuation. This would include: scheduling such that staff do not become overly fatigued by the operation and providing as much advance notice of scheduling as is possible given the nature of the incident. In addition, up-to-date contact lists should be maintained by all organizations for use in an emergency. Alternate technologies that may be utilized in an evacuation include satellite phones and amateur radio.
They should also be identified to the host community as resources that may be called upon to assist evacuees.
This mitigates the risk of families being separated and makes the return of evacuees less complicated.
Evacuation liaisons also assist with creating manifests and determining the order of the return of evacuees in consultation with the Chief, Head of Council, or appointed person from the home community. Once a flight manifest is prepared, it should be sent to the PEOC, which can in turn forward it to other organizations that require the information.
Receiving the information in advance can help ensure that needed services are delivered quickly.
In this situation, evacuations may need to be prioritized and contingency plans implemented. While the Standards provide guidance on hosting First Nations, they may also be applied to municipal or unorganized territory evacuations as they pertain to hosting arrangements. While agreements may exist between EMO and a host community, the community retains the option of not hosting during a particular evacuation.
Emergency planners should assess proposed facilities based on location, capabilities, capacity, accessibility, and resources, as well as how they would route evacuee traffic.
Municipal departments involved in the development of the host facility plan may be able to provide resources to support the set-up and operation of a host facility. Registration involves creating a municipal record, which is covered under municipal privacy legislation. Since the degree of damage will likely vary within the affected area, it might be beneficial to initiate a phased re-entry process. In most instances, people are returned in the reverse order of when they were evacuated (i.e. As with the initial evacuation, numerous resources, especially personnel and transportation related resources will be required to return evacuees to their home community.
It also shows the various partners likely to be involved in an evacuation, broadly reflecting the actions that fall within their jurisdiction. A prompt warning to the relevant persons is necessary part and life saving activity.  Protective actions for life safety are a vital part of ERP. Several steps can be taken for stabilization of circumstances to minimize the potential damage. As emergencies are of different kinds we are in need to make different efficient plans to respond effectively in these situations. Such action will be taken in order to protect public health and safety and the environment. In either case, the CNSC will implement the CNSC Emergency Response Plan CAN2-1 November 2001.
Assistance could include financial assistance where the emergency has been declared to be of concern to the federal government and the province has requested assistance. If the Assembly is not in session at that time, the Premier is required to submit a report within 7 days of the Assembly reconvening. The planning basis selected must strike an appropriate balance in considering these two factors. Over the past 30 years, national standards,  have been developed to provide consistent guidelines for emergency management that are applicable to most industries. Although no two plans will be exactly the same, they should meet strategic objectives in terms of protecting people, property and the environment.
This plan supports the activities being undertaken related to mass evacuation planning for ministry and community emergency management programs. There are two municipalities that fall within the focus area (Moosonee and Pickle Lake) plus more than 30 First Nation communities.
This is facilitated through liaison that may be in place between OIC ministries and federal departments - for example, between the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Health Canada and Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN). Alternatively, the Chief of the First Nation, Head of Council, or an appointed person may decide to conduct a complete or partial evacuation based on an assessment of the threat to area residents. This approach minimizes potentially having people in harm’s way and enables a more controlled evacuation and optimization of resources. Where possible, identify the positions, rather than individuals who may be involved in the operation. Notwithstanding this recommended practice, a host community’s capacity may be such that it is unable to accommodate an entire community. In the event that the list of potential host communities is insufficient for the size of evacuation pending, the PEOC will solicit additional host communities. Details on the set-up and operation of the shelter should be provided in the community’s emergency response plan. Each municipality has the responsibility for managing the record in accordance with the applicable legislation and their municipal policies.
The Chief of a First Nation, Head of Council of a municipality, or appointed person, will decide when to allow evacuees to return to the community. No one can determine the survival chances in a disaster without having an Emergency Response Plan (ERP). The important tool kits should be placed in suitable places to cope with physical state of affairs. 25) and police services operating in the area to provide necessary support and assistance required by such plans, or that which may be needed in an emergency. Many government regulators also have strict rules for emergency preparedness and response, including minimum requirements for emergency response plans. It draws linkages to various hazard management plans and procedures developed by ministries. The exact population at any one time is difficult to report as people who are recorded in the census may be away from the community and some who are not recorded may be in the community. Unorganized territories, fly-in lodges and camps, and mining operations also fall into the plan area. The seasonal roads cannot be relied on for evacuation operations given the short and sometimes unpredictable length of time that they are available.
Local populations often provide the best information on the threat to their community and the region. Emergency responders may require personal protective equipment, as responder safety will be critical.
Where an entire community may not be hosted together in close proximity to the home community, and if the situation allows, the community’s preference should be discussed with the Head of Council, First Nation Chief, or appointed person. The primary reason for returning the most vulnerable people last is to help ensure that support services are in place when they return. Here is a good quality Emergency Response Plan Template that can help anyone in this very task. Emergencies may include natural disasters like hurricane epidemics, terrorist attack, any brutal road accident, some chemical spill at any chemical plant etc. Suitable strategic plans must be ready to implement to deal the emergency conditions in business and organization matters. The current edition of this plan supersedes and replaces all older versions which should be destroyed. For example, there may be people staying at fly-in lodges that do not report year-round population. Sheltering from severe weather such as tornadoes, shelter in place from outside airborne risk such as chemical spill is also included in protective actions. All the involved persons should be abreast about the ERP created to deal with emergency conditions. Similarly, there may be community events that draw tourist and other visitors to the community.



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