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You disaster plan should include insurance, which will protect your equipment, furniture, and office space.
Here’s a link to a great list of 6 tools for preparing your law firm for a disaster (and here). Below are some useful reference and informational material that will assist you in preparing for a natural or man made threat, the unexpected and the unimaginable.
An important facet to Family safety is having a plan and being prepared in case an emergency strikes. It is important so you can increase your personal sense of security and peace of mind and to know you will be ready in case of an emergency. Below are some useful reference and informational material that will assist you in preparing an Emergency Plan. Pin ItEmergency planning can seem overwhelming, so why not set aside just one hour each month to get prepared? In this series of blog posts, Deborah Tauscher, emergency preparedness coordinator at Mills-Peninsula, and Jim Schweikhard, Sutter Health Peninsula Coastal Region environmental health and safety manger, will share tips to help you prepare for disasters in easily manageable steps.
Make signs that say “OK” and “HELP.” These can be placed in your window to quickly communicate with outside organizations responding to an emergency. Designate two emergency meeting places: One right outside your home and one outside your neighborhood, in case you cannot return home or are asked to evacuate your neighborhood.
Designate an out-of area contact for all members of the family to call in case of an emergency. Deborah Tauscher, emergency preparedness coordinator at Mills-Peninsula, and Jim Schweikhard, Sutter Health Peninsula Coastal Region environmental health and safety manger, contributed this blog post.
About This BlogThis blog offers articles & general health tips from our medical experts to promote wellness. The most critical step in being able to recover from a disaster is being prepared for one in the first place. Anyone who has actually managed a business' recovery from a disaster knows that the most critical factor when it comes to business and operation continuity is having a plan in place before the disaster strikes.


In an emergency, the most wasteful use of workers' time (and sometimes their safety), is in setting up makeshift IT triage—that is, on-the-fly access to data and applications after a disaster.
Disaster preparedness means having, at the very least, the data and apps that are required to keep day-to-day operations already running in a remote location and ready to access. Also it's practically guaranteed that, after experiencing a disaster, a company will not be running with its full staff.
In short, IT contingency in wake of emergencies should be as seamless, as compliant with corporate security policies, and as easy for end-users to access as possible. Easier Than Ever Such disaster preparedness is easier than ever for companies to deploy because of changing trends in technology. So, why are many organizations still not on-board with creating strong disaster preparedness plans? Plan arrow jumping over disaster on white background, disaster word in red, plan arrow in blue, disaster management concept. With cloud computing services and cloud storage, there is no excuse for not having adequate data backup methods.
Many law firms and insurance companies offer help to members in creating their disaster plans. When an emergency strikes, knowing what to do can save time, property and most of all, lives. Include your meeting places on your emergency contact card and keep this with you for reference. Let this person know that he or she is the central contact for information gathering, so he or she can let you know where other family members are and how they are. While disaster recovery will always involve some on-fly decision making and adapting to realities on the ground, both of these can be made orders of magnitude easier by having contingency plans and systems already in place, and staff who are already trained how to implement them. Disaster recovery (without proper preparedness) may mean IT scrambling to find a place to set up a replacement server, take a copy of the data and applications from the damaged server, and then restore that data and re-install mission-critical apps to give end-users the alternative access they need to continue key operations. Often, such implementations in the wake of an emergency, are not properly configured, may be insecure, and may not meet required corporate compliances, such as HIPAA.


It also means having trained end-users how to access that in-place, contingent data so they can continue to get to the systems they need, whether they are working on company-issued machines or their own mobile devices. IT employees, who would setup these temporary disaster recovery fixes, may not be available or present to implement them, so redundancies need to be built in, and plans clearly documented, so that whoever needs to step in can do so. Cloud computing, virtualization, and the continuing increase of always-connected and relatively powerful mobile devices in the hands of end-users are all key ingredients in deploying a strong and effective disaster preparedness solution.
In a recent survey conducted by Symantec of IT decision-makers in small- to-mid-sized businesses, only 26 percent have a disaster preparedness plan in place. Clio, a cloud-based law practice management provider, is hosting a disaster preparedness webinar.
The three main priorities to emergency preparedness are getting an emergency preparedness kit, making a plan, and being informed.
Remember in a disaster it may be difficult to get a call through initially, be patient and persevere. Remember your cell phone might not work in a disaster, so don’t rely on storing all your emergency numbers there. In this first of four articles on disaster preparedness, we tell you how to start thinking about disaster preparedness and how to gather the information you will need to create an effective, efficient plan for recovering from whatever fate throws at you. Even a simple water break, roof leak, or break-in, could have catastrophic effects on your own law practice. You’ll need to register online for the event, but this should be a great way to get started. I hesitated signing up for another marketing gimmick, but after the recent tornadoes, I’m attending.



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