Disaster planning and management,emergency preparedness kit for power outage,disaster recovery solutions comparison - How to DIY

The disruption from a disaster can threaten your organization’s operations, profitability, and quality of service and image. Disaster recovery planning (DRP) is a major concern of the entire organization, not just data processing. To determine the Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP) critical needs of the organization, each department should document all the functions performed within that department. Once the critical needs have been documented, management can set priorities within departments for the overall recovery of the organization. Essential activities, a disruption in service exceeding one day would jeopardize seriously the operation of the organization. Recommended activities, a disruption of service exceeding one week would jeopardize seriously the operation of  the organization.
Nonessential activities, this information would be convenient to have but would not detract seriously from the operating capabilities if it were missing. The first step in the disaster recovery process is to perform a business impact analysis that considers all of the the potential impacts from the disaster senarios put forward. For a successful Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP),  the DR plan  must be integrated with the entire enterprise, strong business unit involvement, senior management buy-in and must be regularly tested through drills and exercises that validates your plans. Plan arrow jumping over disaster on white background, disaster word in red, plan arrow in blue, disaster management concept.
If you are new to disaster recovery planning, make sure that you research the subject thoroughly before embarking on a disaster recovery planning project. The primary objective of a Business Resumption Plan is to enable an organization to survive a disaster and to reestablish normal business operations. Historically, the data processing function alone has been assigned the responsibility for providing contingency disaster recovery planning. Defining how contingency planning considerations must be integrated into ongoing business planning and system development processes in order for the plan to remain viable over time. The successful and cost effective completion of such a project requires the close cooperation of management from all areas of Information Systems as well as business areas supported by Information Systems. Since disaster recovery planning is a very complex and labor intensive process, it therefore requires redirection of valuable technical staff and information processing resources as well as appropriate funding. Phase 1 is used to obtain an understanding of the existing and projected computing environment of the organization. The Security Assessment will enable the project team to improve any existing emergency plans and disaster prevention measures and to implement required emergency plans and disaster prevention measures where none exist.
Present findings and recommendations resulting from the activities of the Security Assessment to the Steering Committee so that corrective actions can be initiated in a timely manner. Analyze, recommend and purchase recovery planning and maintenance software required to support the development of the plans and to maintain the plans current following implementation. Another key deliverable of this phase is the definition of the plan scope, objectives and assumptions. Once plans are developed, initial tests of the plans are conducted and any necessary modifications to the plans are made based on an analysis of the test results.
The approach taken to test the plans depends, in large part, on the recovery strategies selected to meet the disaster recovery planning requirements of the organization. The primary objective of recovery planning is to enable an organization to survive a disaster and to continue normal business operations.
Although statistically the probability of a major disaster is remote, the consequences of an occurrence could be catastrophic, both in terms of operational impact and public image. Develop and implement contingency plans that address both immediate and longer-term needs for the Data Centre and other business facilities.


The project team organization is designed to maximize the flexibility needed to deal with the implementation of a plan in the most efficient manner possible. The composition of the Project Team may vary depending on the environments and business units for which plans are developed. The management and control for this project should be supported by project management software.
During Phase 1 activities, detail work plans for Data Processing and user personnel identifying tasks and responsibilities along with their associated start and completion dates will be developed.
The following is a schedule of deliverables by phase that will be developed and delivered as part of this project. Organization who have tried to develop disaster and business resumption plans without dedicating the required resources to the effort have been largely unsuccessful in implementing effective recovery plans. It is therefore essential, that management is committed to the development, implementation and maintenance of this program, that required resources are freed up during the development cycle and that a resource be dedicated to the on-going maintenance of the program. For the rest, this means the recovery of technical environments, such as Information Technology IT systems, networks infrastructure and communications equipment, following an unplanned interruption or outage. This IT DR plans is part of the Business Continuity plans and preparations which are necessary to minimize loss and ensure continuity of the critical business functions of an organization in the event of disaster. A comprehensive and up-to-date Disaster Recovery Plan ( DRP ) prepares your organization for the worst case scenario or key disaster scenario.
In order, to develop an effective plan, all business units and departments should be involved. Organizations should also develop written, comprehensive disaster recovery plans that address all the critical operations and functions of the business. Company could start from a smaller scale testing a specific application defined in the IT disaster recovery plan.
Consider engaging a consultant (internal or external to your organization) to help you in your project planning effort. In order to survive, the organization must assure that critical operations can resume normal processing within a reasonable time frame. Frequently, this has led to the development of recovery plans to restore computer resources in a manner that is not fully responsive to the needs of the business supported by those resources. Senior personnel from Information Systems and user areas must be significantly involved throughout the project for the disaster recovery planning process to be successful. In order to minimize the impact such an undertaking would have on scarce resources, the project for the development and implementation of disaster recovery planning and business resumption plans should be part of the organization’s normal disaster recovery planning activities.
The committee should have the overall responsibility for providing direction and guidance to the Project Team. It is preferable, from an economic and business strategy perspective, to concentrate on activities that have the effect of reducing the possibility of disaster occurrence, rather than concentrating primarily on minimizing impact of an actual disaster.
This report identifies critical service functions and the timeframes in which they must be recovered after interruption.
This phase also includes the implementation of changes to user procedures, upgrading of existing data processing operating procedures required to support selected recovery strategies and alternatives, vendor contract negotiations (with suppliers of recovery services) and the definition of Recovery Teams, their roles and responsibilities. As the recovery strategies are defined, specific testing procedures should be developed to ensure that the written plans are comprehensive and accurate. Management appreciates the implications of an occurrence, therefore, it should assign on-going responsibility for recovery planning to an employee dedicated to this essential service.
As explained earlier in this document, disaster recovery and business resumption planning is a complex and labour intensive program. Both the information processing and the business environments are constantly changing and becoming more integrated and complex.


It is important to note that the managers of environments and business units for which plans are developed will be responsible for the maintenance and testing of their respective plans.
The software should be used for scheduling of personnel resources to specific tasks and identification of end deliverables and their target completion dates.
Some organizations, after spending time and money developing recovery plans, have failed in maintaining their recovery capability. It is critical be to know that your business applications and data are still safe in the event of a disaster. Within all departments the critical needs should be identified and prioritized, critical needs include all information and equipment needed in order to continue operations should a department be destroyed or become inaccessible.
In the second year, move to partial warm data center to an actual production fail over to the DR site. Disaster recovery planning is not a two-month project, neither is it a project that once completed, you can forget about. The committee should also make all decisions related to the disaster recovery planning effort. The BIA Report should then be used as a basis for identifying systems and resources required to support the critical services provided by information processing and other services and facilities. The profile is developed by identifying resources required to support critical functions identified in Phase 3. Testing strategies tailored to the environment should be selected and an on-going testing program should be established. It is critical that existing change management processes are revised to take recovery plan maintenance into account. Throughout the recovery effort, the plan establishes clear lines of authority and prioritizes work efforts. The managers represented on the various teams may choose to recommend other senior individuals in their area to represent them or to join specific teams where their expertise will be required for the development of the plans.
Recovery Planning software implemented during Phase 2 of the project will be used to document the plans.
This is mostly due to a lack of commitment to keep their plans current or to do regular testing of recovery capabilities. There are several products on the market that have been designed to support the development, testing and maintenance of recovery plans. This will ensure the ongoing availability of critical resources and continuity of operations.
This is usually dependent on the risk tolerance and IT audit compliance of the organization. In today’s environment, the effects of long-term operations outage may have a catastrophic impact. The Project Manager should work with the Steering Committee in finalizing the detailed work plan and developing interview schedules for conducting the Security Assessment and the Business Impact Analysis. In areas where change management does not exist, change management procedures will be recommended and implemented. The organization also must ensure that staff with recovery responsibilities are prepared to execute the plans.



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