Last will and testament shakespeare documentary,vin numbers volvo,vin checker porsche,minnesota dmv vin lookup dmv - Reviews

30.09.2014
Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. William Shakespeare's will is nearly 400 years old and has survived the ravages of time and man.
Due to wear and tear created by centuries of scholars hungry for information, the will became very fragile and consequently has been repaired several times. The three page last will and testament of William Shakespeare has been faithfully reproduced and is folded along the original crease lines, ribbon-tied and beautifully presented in a satin-lined, leather-grained card finished burgundy gift box. The Shakespeare family tree, bequest information explaining the will's contents, transcript of the will, conservation and repair of the will and how they were carried out, how much Shakespeare was worth when he died, British currency from 13th century to present day, how to read 17th century handwriting, entertaining facts from Did You Knows? We also have No-Frills-Wills – which consist of the will and the booklet without the satin-lined gift box.
Refunds: Full money-back guarantee on products returned in perfect condition within 40 days of delivery date. William Shakespeare’s last will and testament provides one of the richest surviving documents for understanding his familial and professional networks.
Most individuals in early modern England did not begin writing a will until death was imminent. Scholars have suggested that the will was drafted in January, then revised and partially redrafted on March 25 to reflect the change in the marital status of his daughter Judith. The wording of his revised bequest to Judith is thought to have protected her as a prospective widow to account for her new marital status. Item I give and bequeath unto my daughter Judith one hundred and fifty pounds of lawful English money to be paid unto her in manner and form following, that is to say, one hundred pounds in discharge of her marriage portion within one year after my decease, with consideration after the rate of two shillings in the pound, for so long time as the same shall be unpaid unto her after my decease, and the fifty pounds residue thereof upon her surrendering of, or giving of, such sufficient security as the overseers of this my will shall like of to surrender or grant all her estate and right that shall descend or come unto her after my decease or that she now hath of in or to one Copyhold tenement with the appertenances lying and being in Stratford upon Avon aforesaid in the said county of Warwick, being parcel or holden of the manor of Rowington unto my daughter Susanna Hall and and her heirs forever. Item I give and bequeath unto my said daughter Judith one hundred and fifty pounds more if she or any issue of her body living at the end of three years next ensuing the day of the date of this my will, during which time my executors to pay her consideration from my decease according to the rate aforesaid.
And if she die within the said term without issue of her body then my will is and I do give and bequeath one hundred pounds thereof to my niece Elizabeth Hall, and fifty pounds to be set forth by my executors during the life of my sister Joan Hart and the use and profit thereof coming shall be paid to my said sister Joan, and after her decease the said 50 pounds shall remain amongst the children of my said sister equally to be divided amongst them. But if my said daughter Judith be living at the end of the said three years, or any issue of her body, then my will is, and so I devise and bequeath the said hundred and fifty pounds to be set out by my executors and overseers for the best benefit of her and her issue, and the stock not to be paid unto her so long as she shall be married and covert baron but my will is that she shall have the consideration yearly paid unto her during her life and after her decease the said stock and consideration to be paid to her children if she have any and if not to her executors or assigns, she living the said term after my decease, provided that if such husband as she shall at the end of the said three years be married unto or attain after, do sufficiently assure unto her and the issue of her body, lands answerable to the portion by this my will given unto her, and to be adjudged so by my executors and overseers then my will is that the said £150 shall be paid to such husband as shall make such assurance to his own use. Item I give and bequeath unto my said sister Joan 20 pounds and all my wearing apparel to be paid and delivered within one year after my decease. Item I give and bequeath unto her three sons William Hart [name omitted] Hart and Michael Hart five pounds a piece to be paid within one year after my decease unto her. Item I give and bequeath unto the said Elizabeth Hall all my plate (except my broad silver and gilt bowl) that I now have at the date of this my will. All that capital messuage or tenement with the appurtenances in Stratford aforesaid called the New Place, wherein I now dwell, and two messuages or tenements with the appurtenances situate, lying and being in Henley Street within the borough of Stratford aforesaid. And all my barns, stables, orchards, gardens, lands, tenements, and herediments whatsoever, situate, lying, and being, or to be had, received, perceived, or taken within the towns and hamlets, villages, fields, and grounds of Stratford upon Avon, Old Stratford, Bushopton, and Welcombe, or in any of them in the said county of Warwick. And also all that messuage or tenement with the appurtenances wherein one John Robinson dwelleth, situate, lying and being in the Blackfriars in London near the Wardrobe, and all other my lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever.
To have and to hold all & singular the said premises with their appurtenances unto the said Susanna Hall for and during the term of her natural life and after her decease to the first son of her body lawfully issuing, and to the heirs males of the body of the said first son lawfully issuing and for default of such issue to the second son of her body lawfully issuing and to the heirs males of the body of the said second son lawfully issuing and for default of such heirs to the third son of the body of the said Susanna lawfully issuing and of the heirs males of the body of the said third son lawfully issuing.


All the rest of my goods, chattel, leases, plate, jewels, and household stuff whatsoever, after my debts and legacies paid and my funerall expenses discharged, I give, devise, and bequeath to my son in law John Hall, gent., and my daughter Susanna, his wife, whom I ordain and make executors of this my last will and testament. And I do entreat and appoint the said Thomas Russell, Esquire, and Francis Collins, gent., to be overseers hereof. The will was written on hand made paper with three sheets being originally fastened together by a narrow strip of parchment along the top margin.
The will names many of the important people in his life, including family, friends, colleagues, and neighbors, as well as describing specific pieces of personal property. Many scholars believe that when Shakespeare sent for Francis Collins (who had also drawn up the deeds of bargain and sale for the Blackfriars gatehouse) to draft his will, he was almost certainly ill, although he did not die for another several months. Shakespeare left the bulk of his property to his two daughters: Susanna Hall, his first child, and Judith Quiney.
However, Shakespeare also provides his new son-in-law with an incentive--if Quiney accumulated property, Shakespeare would match it. The probate clause in Latin at the end of the third leaf indicates that John Hall, Shakespeare's son-in-law and co-executor, made an oath to administer the estate on behalf of himself and his wife Susanna, on June 22. According to a 1913 report of the Royal Commision on Public Records, by the 1850s the document had suffered handling damage and was repaired with transparent paper, possibly pelure d’oignon.
I, William Shakespeare of Stratford upon Avon in the county of Warwick, gent., in perfect health and memory, God be praised, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following, that is to say, first I commend my soul into the hands of God my creator, hoping and assuredly believing through the only merits of Jesus Christ my Saviour to be made partaker of life everlasting, and my body to the earth whereof it is made. And I do will and devise unto her the house with the appurtenances in Stratford wherein she dwelleth for her natural life under the yearly rent of 12 pence.
John Nash, 26s 8d; and to my fellows John Heminge, Richard Burbage, and Henry Condell 26s 8d a piece to buy them rings. And for default of such issue the same so to be and remain to the forth, fifth, sixth, and seventh sons of her body lawfully issuing, one after another, and to the heirs males of the bodies of the said forth, fifth, sixth, and seventh sons lawfully issuing in such manner as it is before limited to be and remain to the first, second and third sons of her body and to their heirs males. The handwriting does not match that of Shakespeare’s lawyer, Francis Collins, suggesting that the will was drawn up by a clerk. The signatures are written in shaky strokes of the pen, suggestive of someone who had trouble holding a writing implement due to illness.
He left money and clothes to his sister Joan Hart and her three sons (the name of the third son, Thomas, is left blank), and plate to his grand-daughter Elizabeth Hall, whom he refers to as his niece. Shakespeare may have been wary of Quiney, who, on the day following the will's date, was fined five shillings by the ecclesiastical court in Stratford-upon-Avon for fornication. Other associated documents, such as an inventory of his goods, do not survive and were presumably lost with other Prerogative Court inventories for this date in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Then each leaf was set between two sheets of glass in separate locked oaken frames, which were stored in a locked oaken box in the strong room at Somerset House. 19) and first printed in the third edition of Lewis Theobald's Works of Shakespeare (1752).
The document is written on three sheets of paper, with William Shakespeare’s signature appended to each sheet, as prescribed in contemporary manuals.
On the same leaf, a reference to Shakespeare's son-in-law is altered to his daughter, Judith.


The second best bed bequest should not be seen as a window into William and Anne’s marriage, but as a way to distinguish one bed from another so that his wife received the right bed. His other three surviving signatures show similar slight inconsistencies, suggesting that (like some other literate men) Shakespeare was given to variation rather than mechanical repetition when signing his name. It was kept in the Prerogative Office, first at Doctors' Commons, and then, when the building was torn down in 1861, at the new Prerogative Office at Somerset House, until being transferred in 1962 to the Public Records Office on Chancery Lane.
And for default of such issue to the right heirs of me the said William Shakespeare forever. He never left a letter, a memo, anything." - Charles Beauclerk Credit Courtesy of First Folio Pictures Was Will Shakespeare, the grain dealer from Stratford, really the literary icon we celebrate today?
From 1996-99, the silk lining and old repairs were removed, and small tears on the edges were fixed. Praised by critics as "a powerful artistic achievement," and "a force for historical re-assessment," Last Will. Thus it is thought that the first leaf was entirely rewritten and then revised, and that the second and third leaves were merely revised. Shakespeare left a gift of £10 to the poor of Stratford, as well as bequests to his overseer, Thomas Russell, and his lawyer, Francis Collins. Although the official story of a Stratford merchant writing for the London box office has held sway for centuries, questions over the authorship of the plays and poems has persisted.
He left 26 shillings and 8 pence each to his theatrical fellows Richard Burbage, John Heminges, and Henry Condell, as well as to Hamnet Sadler, William Reynolds, and Anthony and John Nash, to buy mourning rings. Mark Twain, Sigmund Freud, Charlie Chaplin and Orson Welles are among the many famous figures who doubt that a grain-dealer from Stratford-Upon-Avon was England's 'Star of Poets'. He never left a letter, a memo, anything.”-Author, Charles Beauclerk, Shakespeare’s Lost Kingdom The disconnect between the man and the works set into motion the greatest literary manhunt of all time.
Over 60 candidates for authorship have been put forward, including various theories of group authorship.
Each theory compelling but few able to withstand the test of time, save one: Edward De Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. But x-ray examination in 1940 revealed that the artwork had been painted over, covering what many believe to be the lost portrait of Edward DeVere, 17th Earl of Oxford. Through on-camera commentary, a very human author emerges, a real-life Hamlet, whose tragic experiences at the heart of the Tudor state provided the raw material for the canon and gave birth to the anti-Stratfordian and Oxfordian movements. The final act of the film weaves together the major historical events of the late Tudor era, including the crisis of succession and the Essex Rebellion.
The power politics of the Elizabethan age and the towering figure of the Queen herself are explored by the film’s commentators, who seek to connect Shakespeare’s plays and Sonnets to the turbulent world of the court.



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