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admin | Category: Ed Treatment Exercise | 08.03.2016
We know you’re inundated with year-end best books of the year lists–hence our annual tradition in which we reach out to top critics to try to come to some kind of consensus on the best books of the year.
Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself. Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.
Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world. Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award. Bertram and Bloom's (The Best Place to Read, The Best Time to Read) text is written in flowing rhyme that has a nice rhythm and beat to it; it's pleasing to read.
The young protagonist appears in the text mostly in the opening and closing, like book ends; almost everything in between is the librarian's dialogue. The Best Book to Read lets kids know that there's no one best book--that the best book is the one that appeals to you the most. Word usage is carefully chosen to reflect the positive associations--the librarian "welcoming" the kids, or "helping" them "explore" books.
Garland's (The Best Place to Read, I'd Be Your Hero: A Royal Tale Of Godly Character, SantaKid) illustrations are sweet and fun.
The colors are bright and cheerful; all the children wear bright shirts, and the librarian's dress was, for me, a delight to look at, with vivid turquoises, pinks, and purples in a floral design. Garland clearly had fun with the book covers that the children read; the vivid covers or interior pages look as if they're real books, and the authors' names tie in with the book title--such as Ricky Rocket who "wrote" Blast Off!
In most spreads, the left-hand page shows a particular book topic being discussed by the kids and the librarian, with white space around them in lieu of background details, bringing a lightness to the illustrations and contrasting with the illustrations on the opposing page.
If you're looking for a book that celebrates reading, books, and libraries, or that encourages children to read books, choose their own, and visit libraries, then check out this book. We also incorporate lists from some other publications (like the New York Times, Washington Post, The Guardian, AV Club, Slate, and the Chicago Tribune) to come up with our final tally.
When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her. There were only a few brief places where the rhyme felt like it had an extra beat; most rhymes were a pleasure to read.
This works, though at times I would have liked to hear more from the young protagonist; he feels a bit like a device to show what books are available, and not a character. The text suggests books about topics that will interest many kids, especially boys--outer space, insects, knights and dragons, dinosaurs, and magic. The characters all have smiling, happy, rounded faces, with little pug noses and rosy cheeks. Most illustrations on the right page are full-bleed illustrations with detailed backgrounds that show the book's topic coming alive, the kids taking part in most adventures. I can see this book being used in schools and libraries, especially, as well as at home with loved ones.
We have seen such encounters unfold in communities like Ferguson, Missouri, which like Rankine’s words unearth a troubled history and unsettle our expectations for a peaceful future if we don’t begin to recognize the problem of racism in America.2. Because most of the text is dialogue, the text moves quickly, imparting information in an entertaining way, almost without the reader realizing they're learning.
The focus seems to be on boy readers, with some topics that will also interest girls, or that are thrown in specifically for them.


The Best Book to Read is a positive book about books, librarians, and libraries, encouraging readers to see the fun in books and libraries, in the ability to choose books themselves, take them out, and enjoy them. The faces are slightly bigger and wider in proportion to their bodies than they'd be in real life, which makes them a big part of the visual focus, and they have a youngness and cuteness to them. Most objects and characters have a smoothness to them, though Garland makes selective use of texture, found in characters' hair, in the dog, in the dragon.
This makes makes the book topics seem vivid and magical, as if they've been transported off the page and into readers' imaginations. A young boy and his class visit the library, where the librarian introduces them to many book possibilities, and suggests they get a library card to take out books.
Still, the librarian's dialogue is fun and punchy, and introduces ideas about books and libraries in an entertaining way. The characters have an almost 3-D quality, which is accentuated in the faces, and through highlights on the cheeks, noses, and foreheads.
It would have been even more fun to me, though, if the book covers had been of real books that I could then go look up in the library or book store, to see if I enjoyed them. She works hard to understand a century of distrust and strife, while still making her journey to the source, to Istanbul, a personal one filled with revelation and surprising beauty. 3. This is a feel-good book for book lovers, and a great reminder to young readers that there are books to suit every interest and topic, and that libraries are good places to visit.
Still, since the books aren't real, they give readers more room to make their own decisions about what books appeal to them. What book sits outside your list, but has either been overlooked or deserves more attention?
Because the covers and interior pages of the books look so real, they stand out in the illustrations, which have a more cartoonish feel to them. Most or all of the books shown in the illustrations look as if they are non-fiction books--though the text made me think that some, if not most, were fiction. Of special note is the chapter on the history of social protest by the student movements of Mexico, which casts a eye-opening light on recent tragic events of the country, like the disappearance of the 43 students from the college of Ayotzinapa.4. Fiction is so much fun; I would have liked to see more book covers that looked like fictional stories--but that's my bias. Was there one book, either on your list or off your list, fiction or non-fiction, which seems to best encapsulate America in 2014?Again, Claudia Rankine’s “Citizen.”5. This powerful essay ignited an old debate, or rather, gave historical perspective to the reasons political, economic, and social levels of participation will remain at a disadvantage for black communities. Though he does make a case for reparations, I suspect the true goal of Coates’ essay was to offer a larger context to the institutional racism and discriminatory policies that will keep this country from ever reaching the so-called “post-racial” era.6. What is the book from 2014, either from your list or not, fiction or non-fiction, that is most likely to join the canon, or still be discussed 20 years from now?Roxane Gay’s “Bad Feminist.” I absolutely love when a book energizes a conversation, in this case, about feminism today. Today’s feminist is complex, flawed, and embraces contradictions as a form of empowerment and not an expression of weakness.
I want this book to remain popular, to be read a decade from now by my nieces—and nephews—who will have much to learn from Gay’s insightful, articulate and spot-on observations about culture, race, class, and gender.Rigoberto Gonzalez is the author of fourteen books of poetry and prose. Your number one book of the year: In a sentence or two, would you explain why it leads your list?“A Brief History of Seven Killings” is about Jamaica in the 1970s, and constellates around the attempted assassination of Bob Marley.
It’s got crime, politics, sex, spies, ghosts, pop stars, gangsters, history, intrigue, drugs and family: pretty much everything you could ask for in a novel, told by a rich cast of characters, each speaking in his or her own distinctive voice.
Every part of it feels just right, from the cynical pissing contests of the CIA officers to the prickly relationship between two Jamaican sisters.2.


Something you really liked deserving of an extra look?Lydia Millet’s “Mermaids in Paradise” is a comic masterpiece from a writer most often associated with serious fiction on environmental themes.4.
Was there one book, either on your list or off your list, fiction or non-fiction, which seems to best encapsulate America in 2014?Thomas Pikkety’s “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” about the nature and threat of income inequality, is obviously the book of the year, even if I could not get past the first chapter without dozing off. Dystopian novels are class novels by other means—whatever calamity has disrupted the earth has also disrupted society, so the narrative emphasis shifts toward who gets ahead and who gets shut out. Lee’s novel is as great a proof of that concept as I’ve read, a superbly woven vision of haves and have-nots in a broken, not-very-distant future.
Your number one book of the year: In a sentence or two, would you explain why it leads your list?“On Such a Full Sea,” by Chang-rae Lee. Lee’s novel is as great a proof of that concept as I’ve read, a superbly woven vision of haves and have-nots in a broken, not-very-distant future. 2.
What was the strongest debut book of 2014?Phil Klay, “Redeployment.” It took American writers a few years to begin to fully reckon with our military adventures in Iraq and Afghanistan, and in books like “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” and “The Yellow Birds,” the war feels visceral but also a touch historical, like an event in our rearview mirror.
Was there one book, either on your list or off your list, fiction or non-fiction, which seems to best encapsulate America in 2014?On the surface Eula Biss’s “On Immunity” covers a narrow topic—the way childhood vaccination has been misunderstood and politicized in America.
In 2003, Terry Castle wrote “My Heroin Christmas,” a smart and wildly funny essay about “Straight Life,” a 1979 memoir by jazz musician and omnivorous drug enthusiast Art Pepper. This year Lili Anolik revisited the book in Harper’s, writing “The Tale of the Tape” partly to explore the book’s curious origins but also (much like Castle) to deliver a mash note to it.
On the evidence, “Straight Life” is a kind of a magic charm for essayists—read the book, and loose, smart, and witty prose spills out. To pick just one example, I love Anolik’s riff on the background of Pepper’s wife: “Laurie was born into the educated bohemian Jewish middle class. English, yes, for the ferocity of its language, for her emotional acuity at describing how bigotry arrives in offhand comments and in violence, and for her fluid shifts from declamation to abstraction. Psychology and sociology too, for its window into how prejudice is experienced and responded to (or avoided). Rankine was ahead of the news; what would it take for this book not to be ahead of the news two decades from now? Mark Athitakis is a writer, editor, critic and blogger who’s spent more than a dozen years in journalism. Your number one book of the year: In a sentence or two, would you explain why it leads your list?“The Temple of Iconoclasts” came out in Italian in 1972, then in English around 2000, then disappeared — which is fitting, in a way, for a collection of bio-sketches about inspired lunatics whose ideas have been justly or tragically consigned to the dustbin of fictional history — but it feels wholly fresh and vital alongside today’s disrupters and demagogues. Was there one book, either on your list or off your list, fiction or non-fiction, which seems to best encapsulate America in 2014?“The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil” by Stephen Collins.5. What was the best essay that you read this year?
What is the book from 2014, either from your list or not, fiction or non-fiction, that is most likely to join the canon, or still be discussed 20 years from now?Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach trilogy. Something you really liked deserving of an extra look?“Love You, Be Safe” by Cara Hoffman.4.
Was there one book, either on your list or off your list, fiction or non-fiction, which seems to best encapsulate America in 2014?“Brown Girl Dreaming” 5. What was the best essay that you read this year? What is the book from 2014, either from your list or not, fiction or non-fiction, that is most likely to join the canon, or still be discussed 20 years from now?“Brown Girl Dreaming.”Roxane Gay’s writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Best American Mystery Stories 2014, Best American Short Stories 2012, Best Sex Writing 2012, A Public Space, McSweeney’s, Tin House, Oxford American, American Short Fiction, West Branch, Virginia Quarterly Review, NOON, The New York Times Book Review, Bookforum, Time, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, The Rumpus, Salon, and many others. She is also the author of the books Ayiti, An Untamed State, Bad Feminist, and Hunger, forthcoming from Harper in 2016.Rigoberto Gonzalez1.



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