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Although portions of the eclipse will be visible from much of North America, observers in the western third of the continent have the best view. For locations in the rest of the continent, the Moon sets while the eclipse is still in progress.
The eclipse will be seen in its entirety from Hawaii, Japan, New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia and eastern most Asia. Central and eastern North America (and the western half of South America) will see the beginning stages of the eclipse before moonset while most of Asia witnesses the later stages after moonrise. One of the great things about lunar eclipses is that they are completely safe to view with the naked eye. You don't need a telescope to watch the eclipse, although a good pair of binoculars will enhance your experience. An eclipse of the Moon can only take place at Full Moon, and only if the Moon passes through some portion of Earth's shadow. The outer shadow or penumbra is a zone where Earth blocks some (but not all) of the Sun's rays. In contrast, the inner shadow or umbra is a region where Earth blocks all direct sunlight from reaching the Moon. If the entire Moon passes through the umbral shadow, then a total eclipse of the Moon occurs. Each of these three eclipses has a unique appearance (see Visual Appearance of Lunar Eclipses).
The following diagrams (in high resolution) show the Moon's path through Earth's shadows during April's eclipse.
From the eastern and central USA and Canada (time zones EDT and CDT), the eclipse begins shortly before sunrise and the Moon sets in the west just as the Sun rises. From much of the western USA and Canada (time zones MDT and PDT), most of the eclipse is visible but the Moon sets before the partial phases end. The entire event is also visible from Alaska and Hawaii (time zones AKDT and HST), as well as Japan, New Zealand, Australia and Indonesia. However, the Moon actually moves WEST to EAST (right to left in the Northern Hemisphere) with respect to the Earth's shadow and the stars. At the same time, the Moon, Earth's shadow and the stars all rise in the east and set in the west. The partial eclipse begins as the Moon's eastern edge slowly moves into Earth's umbral shadow. During the partial phases, it takes one hour and forty-two minutes for the Moon's orbital motion to carry it entirely within Earth's dark umbra. The most striking thing about this eclipse is that the total phase (when the Moon is completely inside the umbral shadow) is very short, lasting just four and a half minutes. The color and brightness of the totally eclipsed Moon can vary considerably from one eclipse to another. Dark eclipses are caused by volcanic gas and dust which filters and blocks much of the Sun's light from reaching the Moon.
Although Indonesia's Mount Kelud has undergone recent volcanic eruptions, it has not produced enough dust and gas to significantly darken April's eclipse.
After the total phase ends, it is once again followed by a partial eclipse as the Moon gradually leaves the umbral shadow. The Visual Appearance of Lunar Eclipses describes what each of these eclipse phases looks like.
The major phases of the eclipse occur as follows (all times are GMT or Greenwich Mean Time).
Eclipse times for time zones in the United States and Canada are shown in the following table. Two notable exceptions are Arizona (although the Navajo Nation does observe Daylight Saving Time) and Hawaii. The table above provides times of the major eclipse phases for North American time zones and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Although the none of the eclipse is visible from England, astronomers use GMT (actually UTC or Coordinated Universal Time) as the standard time for describing astronomical events.
Eclipse times for other time zones can be calculated by taking the difference between local time and Greenwich and adding it to the tabulated GMT times. The eclipse times for the western Pacific (New Zealand, Australia, & Japan) can be found in the table below. This web page allows you to calculate the viewing circumstances of all lunar eclipses visible from your city over a five-thousand year period.
April's lunar eclipse is well placed for westernmost North America, Hawaii, Japan, New Zealand and Australia where the entire event will be visible.
Observers in eastern North America and western South America will miss some stages of the eclipse because they occur after moonset.
Similarly, observers in central Asia, will miss the early stages of the eclipse since it begins before moonrise. No part of the eclipse is visible from Europe, Africa, the Middle East or eastern South America. Preceeding and following the eclipse are approximately hour-long penumbral phases but these are faint and quite difficult to see. The entire eclipse is visible from start to finish in the white (unshaded) portion of the map, while none of the eclipse can be seen from the dark gray areas. The contact curves labeled U1, U2, U3, and U4 represent each phase of the eclipse (see the key above). If you are east (right) of a particular curve, that phase occurs after moonset and you will not see it. However, if you are west (left) of a curve, that phase occurs before moonset and you will see it (weather permitting). For example, on the above map Ohio and Illinois both lie west (left) of the U1 curve (partial eclipse begins) and east (right) of the curve U2 (total eclipse begins). This means that from this region, the Moon sets during the partial phases before totality begins.
For observers located within the second light gray shaded region labeled Eclipse at Moonrise, the Moon rises while some phase of the eclipse is already in progress.
If you are west (left) of a particular curve (U1, U2, U3, or U4), that phase occurs before moonrise and you will not see it.
However, if you are east (right) of a contact curve, that phase occurs after moonrise and you will see it (weather permitting). At the instant of mid-totality (12:00 GMT), the Moon will lie at the zenith for observers in the South Pacific Ocean near the Solomon Islands. Eclipse magnitude is the fraction of the Moon's diameter immersed in Earth's umbral shadow at greatest eclipse. In the case of April's eclipse, the magnitude is just slightly greater than 1.0 meaning that the Moon barely passes inside the umbral shadow.
A search of the 685 total lunar eclipses occurring between 1501 and 2500 (Thousand Year Canon of Lunar Eclipses 1501 to 2500) reveals that the April 4th eclipse is the 4th shortest during this 1,000-year period. If we expand our search to include the 3,479 total lunar eclipses occurring during the 5,000-year period -1999 to 3000, we find that the April 4th eclipse still places a respectable 8th shortest.


From the eclipse diagrams shown earlier, it is clear that the southern (bottom) edge of the Moon will dip much deeper into the Earth's shadow than will the northern (top) edge. Since Earth's umbral shadow is darker in the center than at the edge, the Moon's appearance will likely change dramatically with time as the total phase progresses. Because the lunar disk barely passes completely within Earth's umbral shadow, expect the Moon's northern edge to appear many times brighter than the rest of the Moon during the brief total phase. The photo below should give you a good idea of what the Moon should look like during totality.
This could be an excellent opportunity for budding astronomers to test their observing skills. Compare your results with your companions and classmates and discover how the Moon's appearance changes during the total eclipse. The brightness of the totally eclipsed Moon is very sensitive to the presence of volcanic dust in Earth's atmosphere.
The amount of dust and sulfur dioxide in Earth's atmosphere also has an effect on the diameter of the umbral shadow. Amateur astronomers with telescopes can make careful timings of when some of the Moon's major craters enter or exit the umbra. Since the Moon appears quite small in the sky, you'll need a fairly powerful telephoto lens (400 mm or more) or even a small telescope to attach to your camera.
However, a pair of binoculars will magnify the view and make the red coloration brighter and easier to see.
Although total eclipses of the Moon are of limited scientific value, they are remarkably beautiful events which do not require expensive equipment.
They help to cultivate interest in science and astronomy in children and to provide a unique learning opportunity for families, students and teachers. The three dimensional reality of our universe comes alive in a graceful celestial ballet as the Moon swings through Earth's shadow. The penumbral phases of the eclipse have been mentioned several times as being difficult to see. Even when half of the Moon's disk is immersed in the pale penumbral shadow, no trace of it is visible with or without a telescope. About ten minutes before the partial phase begins (10:05 GMT), the penumbral shading is much more apparent, but the Moon's disk is only diminished slightly in brightness. The most interesting stage of the penumbral phase is during the last two minutes just before the edge of the Moon's disk begins to enter the umbral shadow (the start of the partial eclipse).
Still, this stage of the eclipse literally pales in comparison to the dynamic partial phases and the gloriously beautiful totality.
After totality and the partial phases end (13:45 GMT), the penumbral phases occur in reverse. The Moon exits the penumbra at 14:59 GMT but no trace of the shadow is visible to mark the event. To get an idea of what to expect during the deeper penumbral phases, see Visual Appearance of Lunar Eclipses.
The second eclipse is on September 28 and will be visible from the eastern USA and western Europe. In the case of the April 4 eclipse, the westernmost USA sees the entire eclipse while the eastern USA misses the end because the Moon sets while the eclipse is still in progress.
These two eclipses are the last of four consecutive total lunar eclipses, each separated by six months - a series known as a tetrad.
During the 5000-year period from 2000 BCE through 3000 CE, there are 3479 total lunar eclipses. Approximately 16.3% (568) of these belong to one of the 142 tetrads occurring over this period. The mechanism causing tetrads involves the eccentricity of Earth's orbit in conjunction with the timing of eclipse seasons. During the present millennium, the first eclipse of every tetrad occurs during the period February to July. In later millennia, the first eclipse date gradually falls later in the year because of precession. Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli first pointed out that the frequency of tetrads is variable over time. He noticed that tetrads were relatively plentiful during one 300-year interval, while none occurred during the next 300 years.
For example, there are no tetrads from 1582 to 1908, but 17 tetrads occur from 1909 to 2156.
The ~565-year period of the tetrad "seasons" is tied to the slowly decreasing eccentricity of Earth's orbit. In the distant future when Earth's eccentricity is 0 (about 470,000 years from now), tetrads will no longer be possible.
For the 300-year period 1901 to 2200, the largest umbral magnitude of a tetrad eclipse is 1.4251 on 1949 Apr 13. For comparison, the magnitudes of some other total eclipses during this period are much larger.
The table below gives the dates of each eclipse in the 8 tetrads occurring during the 21st century. This multiple exposure sequence shows both partial and total phases of the Total Lunar Eclipse of January 21, 2000. Although penumbral lunar eclipses are included in this list, they are quite difficult to observe because of their subtlety. The Umbral Eclipse Magnitude is the fraction on the Moon's diameter immersed in the umbra at maximum eclipse.
A minor type of eclipse is the penumbral eclipse, which occurs when the Moon passes through Earth's faint penumbral shadow. Penumbral eclipses are rarely discernible to the naked eye and are of lesser importance than umbral eclipses. All photographs, text and web pages are © Copyright 1970 - 2015 by Fred Espenak, unless otherwise noted. Alaska (AK) 90% of Alaska is (1 hour) behind the Pacific Time Zone, while the far reaches of the Aleutian Islands use Hawaii-Aleutian time.
The UTC Time (shown directly below) is the standard time zone upon which all other worldwide time zones are based. A total eclipse of the Moon occurs during the early morning hours of April 15, 2014 and is visible from most of North and South America. For observers in westernmost North America and Hawaii, the eclipse actually begins on the evening of April 14.
Northwestern Africa and Greenland will see the beginning stages of the eclipse before moonset while northeastern Asia and Australia witness the later stages after moonrise. You don't even need a telescope to watch the eclipse, although a good pair of binoculars will help.
From the eastern and central USA and Canada (time zones ADT, EDT and CDT), the eclipse occurs during the early morning hours of April 15.
From the western USA and Canada (time zones MDT and PDT) and Alaska (AKDT), the eclipse acually begins before midnight on the night of April 14, and ends on the morning of April 15.


The partial eclipse begins as the Moon's eastern edge slowly moves into the Earth's umbral shadow. During the partial phases, it takes just over an hour for the Moon's orbital motion to carry it entirely within the Earth's dark umbra. April's lunar eclipse is perfectly placed for most of North and South America where the entire event will be visible. Observers in northwestern Africa and the eastern half of South America will miss some stages of the eclipse because they occur after moonset.
Similarly, observers in Japan and Australia will miss the early stages of the elipse since it begins before moonrise. New Zealand sees the entire eclipse except in the southwest where the eclipse is already in progress at moonrise.
No part of the eclipse is visible from Europe, most of Africa, the Middle East or most of Asia. Preceeding and following the eclipse are hour-long penumbral phases but these are faint and quite difficult to see. For example, on the above map Newfoundland lies west (left) of the U3 curve (total eclipse ends) and east (right) of the curve U4 (partial eclipse ends). This means that from this region, the Moon sets during the partial phases following totality.
For observers located within the second light gray shaded region labeled Eclipse at Moonrise, the situation is reversed.
At the instant of mid-totality (07:46 GMT), the Moon will lie in the zenith for observers in the South Pacific Ocean near Easter Island. From the eclipse diagrams shown earlier, it is clear that the northern (top) edge of the Moon will dip much deeper into the Earth's shadow than will the southern (bottom) edge. This could be an excellent opportunity for budding astronomers and students to test their observing skills. The red planet Mars will also be conspicuous shining brightly about 9° northwest of the Moon. Having just passed opposition (its nearest point to Earth) just one week earlier, Mars is still very bright and may ever outshine the Moon at mid eclipse.
About ten minutes before the partial phase begins (5:48 GMT), the penumbral shading is much more apparent, but the Moon's disk is only diminished slightly in brightness.
After totality and the partial phases end (9:33 GMT), the penumbral phases occur in reverse. The Moon exits the penumbra at 10:38 GMT but no trace of the shadow is visible to mark the event.
In this case, the western USA sees the entire eclipse while the eastern USA misses the end of the eclipse because the Moon sets while the eclipse is still in progress. These two eclipses of are the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses (each separated by six months) - a series known as a tetrad. Approximately 16.3% (568) of all total eclipses belong to one of the 142 tetrads occurring over this period. Although penumbral lunar eclipses are included in this list, they are usually quite difficult to observe because of their subtlety. A minor type of eclipse is the penumbral eclipse, which occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's faint penumbral shadow. All photographs, text and web pages are © Copyright 1970 - 2014 by Fred Espenak, unless otherwise noted. This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933 and of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Actual results could differ materially from those projected in our forward-looking statements due to risks, uncertainties and other factors. Any Stockholder who desires a copy of the Company’s 2015 Annual Report on Form 10-K dated on or about February 23, 2016 with the SEC may obtain a copy (excluding Exhibits) without charge by addressing a request to the Office of the Corporate Secretary, The AES Corporation, 4300 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, Virginia 22203.
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With the fall Daylight Saving Time ending change taking place on Sunday, November 1, 2015, many people have woken up unsure of what time it actually is in their region.
Matt Stone and Trey Parker, the co-creators of 'South Park,' described their possible future project during a panel at San Diego Comic-Con 2016.
If you have any confusion about what time it is and how you should set your clock in the USA, don't worry. We've pulled together a set of clocks to show what time it is in your USA regions now that the Daylight Saving Time change has happened. Find out what time it is right now in ET, PT and more time zones for the United States below.What Time Is It In Eastern Time Zone (EDT) After Daylight Saving Time Change Begins Nov 1, 2015? You might have woken up by your alarm clock on time, only to be fooled by the kitchen stove or microwave clock telling you you’ve got an extra hour to laze around! What a miserable shock it’ll be to be late after losing an hour to Daylight Savings spring time change!Your Battery Operated Wall Clock   - This one is much like the kitchen clock.



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