Treating edema from chf usd,descargar co-ed school - too late,ford kuga 2011 trend - Reviews

admin | Category: Ed Treatment San Antonio | 30.09.2015
Edema is a condition which causes accumulation of fluid in certain specific body parts like ankle, legs ( peripheral), arms, neck, lungs (pulmonary edema), face, arms and even in hand veins and eyelids, that leads to swelling. Certain diseases which affects our veins, the lymph drainage system, heart disease, allergies or food intolerance and certain lifestyle factors can cause edema. The location of fluid retention can provide the clues regarding the cause behind the accumulation of fluid. Edema slows down the healing process, can affect blood circulation, lead to skin infection and can be painful too.
To prevent the retention of fluids, a low salt diet including reduction of salty foods like pickles, soya sauce, and olive is recommended. But limiting the alcohol and making other dietary changes like reducing the intake of sugar, caffeine and dairy product can help in preventing the symptoms from recurring. They help in increasing the urine production which helps alleviate retention of fluid in the body.
Daily application of hot and cold compress alternatively can also help to control the edema symptoms. There are other alternative treatments like Ayurveda, acupuncture, juice therapy and traditional Chinese medicines that can effectively treat edema.
The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. The goal of any treatment, laser, steroid injections or anti-VEGF injections is to reduce the swelling. Usually, a fluorescein angiogram is performed to demonstrate where the normal retinal blood vessels are leaking. Treatment can involve anywhere from a few to dozens of burns…all depending upon the number leaks. Laser treatment to the center of the macula could lead to a permanent blind spot in the vision and, therefore, is not always the best treatment for every patient. After 4-6 months, I can usually tell if the laser treatment is effective or needs to be augmented (ie. There are a variety of treatments for diabetic macular edema.   Laser treatment is still the standard of care for treating this common condition seen with diabetic retinopathy.
Trying to mirror some current events (relatively current, anyway), House delivers an episode that in underwhelmingly average. Brant, a young soldier being escorted by the military police, has a seizure and ends up admitted to House’s service.
Given these new symptoms, the differential consists of extramedullary hematopoesis (the production of blood cells outside the outside of the bone marrow), tuberculosis, brucellosis, lymphoma, or sarcoidosis. I realize it’s been quite a while since I’ve done a surgical rotation, but it was my understanding that the treatment for symptomatic splenic sequestration was a splenectomy, not just “squeezing the spleen.” If you leave the spleen in there, the problem is just going to recur. If Chase noticed the abnormally lumpy spleen while performing surgery, why not take a second and get a biopsy? I don’t seen any indication in the literature that DIC is associated with Bernard Soulier syndrome.
Starting Graves treatment with potentially nasty antithyroid medication without performing the quick and easy confirmatory tests?
The medical mystery was slightly above average this week, but would a new onset seizure really be admitted to House’s service? Wendy Lee, a weapons designer, suffers a tonic-clonic seizure in the middle of a weapons demonstration and is admitted to House’s team. The MRI is normal, and the team learns that Lee has a vindictive ex-boyfriend and may be a victim of poisoning, but her toxin screens were negative. Lee has another seizure and the tests have all been normal, so the team is back to square one. Lee takes a turn for the worse, developing ventricular tachycardia and then a heart attack. Taub stalks out when Foreman starts listing all the things that could cause Lee’s condition, implying that is the wrong way of going about treating the patient.
Taub stating he’ll treat the symptoms sounds good in practice, but is problematic in reality without knowing the underlying cause.
Activated charcoal won’t do any good once the poison has passed from the gastrointestinal tract, which would have been the case when Chase suggested using it. The tests show no urinary or kidney infections, so the very next thing Taub claims Lee has a urinary infection. The ultrasound and CT scan which showed the inflammation around the kidney probably would have shown the kidney stone too, or at least signs of urinary obstruction. An interesting mystery and clever solution weakened by a diagnosis that requires way too much coincidence and overlooking more obvious answers. Nicole is a 25 year old Chinese woman raised in New Jersey who was given up for adoption as a young infant. While Kutner is examining Nicole, she develops abdominal pain again and he notices that she is becoming tachycardic (has a faster than normal heart rate) and has signs of liver failure, meaning that SARS is the wrong diagnosis.
Taub suggests Roz may have cryoglubulinemia (abnormal proteins in the blood that thicken with cold temperatures), but House feels she has porphyria (problems in the synthesis of hemoglobin), and her sudden conversion to Judaism suggests the mental problems commonly seen in certain types of porphyria.
Infection is now considered as a possible diagnosis, as is Addison’s Disease (a condition where the adrenal glands do not make enough steroid hormones). I really don’t have too many medical complaints this episode, other than my usual litany of untrained people doing potentially dangerous tests and results comic back to quickly. I’m not clear on what caused her shortness of breath (that improved overnight) or her sudden leg pain (other than, you know, that fracture thing). Cate is a psychiatrist working at the South Pole on a psychological research project, as well as serving as the physician for the team stationed there. House, Foreman, and Wilson are now dealing with the station mechanic, as Cate is in a coma.
House’s team now considers what condition could cause kidney problems, lung problems, and increased intracranial pressure. Fat emboli can definitely cause lung problems in the form of pulmonary embolism (clots to the lungs), but I don’t see any way it cause a tension pneumothorax. Sending someone with an autoimmune disease or vasculitis out in the cold is not a clever idea. I can see how a fat embolism in the brain could cause a coma (from causing a stroke), but I don’t know that it would increase the intracranial pressure and cause a coma that way. I give the medical mystery an A because it was the best mystery they’ve had in a while. Fletcher Stone, a famous journalist, is at an office function when he falls and hits his head on a desk.
The soap opera aspect consisted of House and Stacey flying to Baltimore to defend House’s Medicare billing. As a result of fluid retention, the most common symptoms are swelling of legs or ankles, puffy eyes and weight gain. As edema cannot be cured and until the underlying cause is addressed, here are some remedies that can keep the swelling in control.
Wearing support stocking that are easily available in drug stores can restrict water collection in your legs and ankles by putting pressure. Low salt diet will help to decrease total fluid circulation and also encourages an even distribution.
Consumption of whole grain foods, onion, cucumber, apples, grapes, oranges, potatoes and cabbage is beneficial. Along with this vitamins and mineral supplements are also prescribed to support proper functioning of the body as diuretics may flush out the essential nutrients from the body as well. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the radially inward pressure is substantially uniform over the length of the second sleeve.
The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the second sleeve comprises a tube formed at least partly from a stretchable thin fabric. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein the thin fabric compression sleeve is formed of an elastically resilient, low friction material. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising, a third sleeve slidably receivable over the second sleeve, the third sleeve configured to apply a radially inward pressure to the second sleeve. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein the second and third sleeves are each stretchable thin fabric compression sleeves.
The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said multiplicity of pressure applying protrusions are spaced apart to provide a multiplicity of high pressure points or lines when applied over said body part.
The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said pressure applying protrusions each have a height from a base to a tip in the range from 0.5 cm to 15 cm.
The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising an outer covering which secures the bases of the finger over a generally cylindrical surface.
The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said multiplicity of protrusions comprises a sheet of compressible plastic foam. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said multiplicity of pressure applying fingers are configured to apply pressure in a pattern encircling a limb of a patient to provide a multiplicity of high pressure points or lines within the limb of said patient.
The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said first sleeve is configured to encircle a torso of the patient.
The apparatus of claim 1, wherein grid pattern of pressure-applying resilient protrusions are arranged in rows with channels of space disposed in four different directions between successive rows. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the spacing between each of the multiplicity of pressure-applying resilient protrusions is uniform. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the radially inward pressure is substantially uniform over the length of the second sleeve.
The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the second sleeve comprises a tube formed at least partly from a stretchable thin fabric.
The apparatus of claim 19, wherein the thin fabric compression sleeve is formed of an elastically resilient, low friction material. The apparatus of claim 17, further comprising, a third sleeve slidably receivable over the second sleeve, the third sleeve configured to apply a radially inward pressure to the second sleeve. The apparatus of claim 21, wherein the second and third sleeves are each stretchable thin fabric compression sleeves. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said multiplicity of pressure applying protrusions are spaced apart to provide a multiplicity of high pressure points or lines when applied over said body part.
The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said pressure applying protrusions each have a height from a base to a tip in the range from 0.5 cm to 15 cm.


The apparatus of claim 17, further comprising an outer covering which secures the bases of the finger over a generally cylindrical surface.
The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said multiplicity of protrusions comprises a sheet of compressible plastic foam. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said multiplicity of pressure applying fingers are configured to apply pressure in a pattern encircling a limb of a patient to provide a multiplicity of high pressure points or lines within the limb of said patient. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said first sleeve is configured to encircle an arm of the patient.
The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said first sleeve is configured to encircle a leg of the patient.
The apparatus of claim 17, wherein said first sleeve is configured to encircle a torso of the patient. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein grid pattern of pressure-applying resilient protrusions are arranged in rows with channels of space disposed in four different directions between successive rows. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the spacing between each of the multiplicity of pressure-applying resilient protrusions is uniform. Proper diet, regular fluid monitoring and treating the underlying causes are the key steps one can take to treat edema. Interleukin-8 reduces post-surgical lymphedema formation by promoting lymphatic vessel regeneration. The final solution kinda fit, if you ignored symptoms that should have been there, and overlooked some ones that shouldn’t. Description of the Background ArtA variety of devices and methods have been proposed for the treatment of lymphedema in the arms and elsewhere.
Many such devices utilize a sequential pump which works like a multiplicity of blood pressure cuffs extending from the shoulder to the hand, which contract and expand individually. When Kutner goes to draw her blood, he discovers Nicole is not in her room; he finds her outside the hospital, smoking. Thirteen reports that Roz’s urine culture was negative (meaning no urinary tract infection) and there is no history of trauma or sexually transmitted diseases.
When he was later examined in the hospital, he was also noted to have agraphia, the inability to write. When the pressure upon that area is released, a similar blanket pressure is then applied to the portion of the arm covered by the next adjacent chamber, and so on up the arm. Such blanket pressures are applied sequentially from the distal to the proximal ends of the arm, with the intention of forcing the fluids up the arm and into the trunk of the body, where existing lymph nodes can process them.Another prior mode of treatment has been a double walled sheath or stocking in which air pressure is introduced between the walls to squeeze the limb. These cells are successively inflated with uniform air pressure from the distal end to the proximal end of the sheath with the intent of promoting fluid flow in the desired direction.
The strain this is putting on the right adrenal gland (located on top of the kidney) likely explains most of her other symptoms.
Such systems have been largely ineffectual, as they rely on air pressure being maintained at the same level or magnitude in any one of, or all, of the pressurized cells, producing a blanket effect. 4,370,975 discloses an apparatus for treating lymphedema and similar fluid retention afflictions through the use of a multi-cell inflatable sheath which encompasses the swollen limb. Pressure is applied in the cells of the sheath in timed sequence from the distal cell to the proximal cell, the sequence of pressure applied also defining a decreasing gradient pressure from a maximum pressure applied in the distal cell to a minimum pressure applied in the proximal cell when all of the cells are pressurized. Generally, for each of the adjacent cells the more distal has applied a higher pressure than the more proximal. 5,063,910 shows an apparatus for treating vascular, metabolic and functional imbalance of a limb by variations in pressure of a high-density fluid, such as a mercury bath, around the limb.The problem with this device is that the pressure applied by this means is, in fact, a blanket-pressure, which increases with the depth of the limb portion within the fluid bath, resulting in the disadvantages described above for al other pressure systems. 5,257,956, shows a garment for use by post-mastectomy patients which alleviates post-operative pain and discomfort and facilitates normal activity during the recovery period. 3,975,929, shows a stocking knit on a circular knitting machine which provides a gradually decreasing compressive force on the leg of the of the wearer from the ankle upwardly to the top of the stocking.
Thus resulting in a counter-producing effect.The cost of sequential pumps including necessary limb compression apparatus range from $500 to over $8,000.
2,533,504, 2,699,165, 2,781,041, 2,943,859, 3,173,420, 3,454,010, 6,548,819, 3,561,435, 3,728,875, 3,845,769, 3,862,629, 3,885,554, 3,942,518, 3,975,929, 4,013,069, 4,030,488, 4,180,065, 4,320,746, 4,370,975, 4,374,518, 4,402,312, 4,552,133, 4,583,522, 4,773,397, 4,922,893, 4,938,208, 4,961,418, 5,108,426, 5,109,832, 5,117,812, 5,171,211, 5,172,689, 5,228,142, 5,233,974, 5,257,956 and 5,310,400.SUMMARY OF THE INVENTIONThe present invention provides improved apparatus and methods for treating body parts of the patient, particularly the limbs, to relieve swelling due to lymphedema and other causes. The apparatus comprises a plurality of sleeves received one over another onto a patient's limb. In various embodiments of the present invention, a secondary sleeve, (which is slipped over the therapeutic pressure sleeve), comprises a thin fabric compression sleeve. In still further alternate embodiments, both a thin fabric compression sleeve and an inflatable compression sleeve are received over the therapeutic pressure sleeve.When using either the thin fabric compression or inflatable compression sleeve as the secondary sleeve, the inner therapeutic pressure sleeve is first pulled into position over the patient's limb.
Thereafter, the secondary sleeve is pulled into position over the therapeutic pressure sleeve. As will be explained, the therapeutic pressure sleeve exerts a therapeutic pressure at select locations on the patient's limb. The secondary sleeve exerts a pressure on the inner therapeutic pressure thereby increasing the therapeutic pressure on the patient's body surface.
In certain preferred embodiments, both a thin fabric compression sleeve and an inflatable compression sleeve are simultaneously used, with the inflatable compression sleeve received over the thin fabric compression sleeve. In such embodiments, the inflatable compression sleeve exerts a pressure on the thin fabric compression sleeve which in turn exerts a pressure on the therapeutic pressure sleeve, thereby increasing the therapeutic pressure applied to the patient's limb.In one preferred embodiment, the secondary sleeve is formed of a thin fabric sheet of elastically deformable material having a diameter somewhat smaller than the outer diameter of the therapeutic pressure sleeve.
Accordingly, such a thin fabric compression sleeve is dimensioned to fit tightly around the therapeutic pressure sleeve. The thin fabric compression sleeve is circumferentially stretched when slipped into position over the therapeutic pressure sleeve. The natural elastic tendency of the thin fabric compression sleeve to constrict will exert a pressure on the therapeutic pressure sleeve, thereby increasing the therapeutic pressure exerted by the therapeutic pressure sleeve on the patient's limb.
In this embodiment of the secondary sleeve, the therapeutic pressure and thin fabric compression sleeve materials are selected such that the coefficient of friction between the therapeutic pressure sleeve and thin fabric compression sleeve is sufficiently low such that the thin fabric compression sleeve can easily be slipped on (and off) over the therapeutic pressure sleeve after the therapeutic pressure sleeve has already been slipped onto the patient's limb.
By using a therapeutic pressure and a thin fabric compression sleeve together, a higher therapeutic pressure can comfortably be applied to the patient's limb than could comfortably be applied by one tightly fitting elastically deformable therapeutic pressure sleeve alone.
This is due to the fact that should only one elastically deformable therapeutic pressure sleeve instead be used, this sleeve would have to be dimensioned to be initially tightly received over the limb, thus being difficult for the patient to comfortably slip on and off.Another advantage of using thin fabric compression sleeves is that more than one thin fabric compression sleeve can be used simultaneously. Should two or more thin fabric compression sleeves be used, the additional outer sleeves can be received over the inner sleeves such that the addition or removal of the outer sleeves can be used as a means of pressure adjustment.
Moreover, when using such thin fabric outer compression sleeves, these sleeves can be made to shorter lengths than the inner therapeutic pressure sleeve such that one or more of these shorter sleeves can be received only over particular length portions of the patient's limb, as desired. Accordingly, bands of different therapeutic pressures can be simultaneously maintained at different locations on the patient's limb.In another embodiment, the secondary sleeve comprises an inflation device such as an inflatable bladder.
Inflation of such a sleeve causes the inflatable compression sleeve to expand such that the inner surface of the sleeve exerts a pressure on the outer surface of the inner therapeutic pressure sleeve, thereby increasing the therapeutic pressure delivered to the patient.
When initially deflated, the inflatable compression sleeve may therefore be dimensioned to be initially loosely received over the therapeutic pressure sleeve.
An advantage of such a secondary inflatable sleeve received over the therapeutic pressure sleeve is that it is possible to easily adjust the therapeutic pressure applied to the limb by adjusting the inflation pressure in the inflatable compression sleeve.In addition, when using an inner therapeutic pressure sleeve within a periodically inflating and deflating outer inflatable compression sleeve, the pressure range exerted by the inflatable compression sleeve can be attenuated, while still maintaining a therapeutic pressure on the patient's limb. Specifically, the inner therapeutic sleeve will maintain a baseline therapeutic pressure on the limb even when the outer inflatable compression sleeve is intermittently deflated. Moreover, the inner therapeutic pressure sleeve will also operate to limit the maximum pressure applied to the limb when the inflatable compression sleeve is inflated. Furthermore, a gentler rate of increase and a gentler rate of decrease in the net pressure applied to the limb by the inflatable compression sleeve will be achieved by the use of an inner therapeutic pressure sleeve within an inflatable compression sleeve.
Accordingly, a very beneficial therapeutic massaging effect can be generated.In certain embodiments, the inflatable compression sleeve may have separate pressurized compartments such that different levels of therapeutic pressure may be applied to different portions of the patient's limb. The pressures in the various compartments may themselves be varied such that a therapeutic massaging effect is generated.In all of the various embodiments of the present invention, the use of a plurality of separate sleeves has numerous advantages including ease of adjusting the pressure on the patient's limb. Since the pressure applied to the patient's limb can be altered by adding or removing an outer sleeve or sleeves, or by varying the inflation pressure of the inflatable compression sleeve, optimal therapeutic pressures can be tailored to each individual patient's needs, which may vary over time and may also vary from one location to another on the patient's limb.Another advantage of the present use of multiple sleeves is ease of manufacturing since additional fastening elements are not required to “close” or “tighten” the therapeutic pressure or secondary sleeves. Rather, the dimension and construction of the sleeves themselves is itself sufficient to produce an appropriately high pressure therapeutic device.The therapeutic pressure sleeve provides a therapeutic system of applying pressure at select locations on the patient's limbs such that lymphedema, edema and other swelling disorders are treated, as follows. The therapeutic pressure sleeve comprises a multiplicity of pressure-applying resilient protrusions such as fingers or ridges which are arranged to apply inward pressure onto a surface of the body part to relieve swelling.
The protrusions will be formed from a compressible material, such as foam rubber, and pressure will be applied by wrapping or otherwise compressing or collapsing the protrusions onto the body portion so that the fingers apply a controlled level of pressure onto a localized area over the body part surface. In all embodiments, the protrusions will be spaced-apart in an array so that the tips of the fingers or ridges which engage the body part surface apply pressure in a spaced-apart manner. Surprisingly, it has been found that applying such a distributed pattern of spaced-apart pressure points or lines against the skin effectively reduces swelling resulting from lymphedema and other edemas in a simple and cost-effective manner.
In particular, the method and apparatus of the present invention do not block or inhibit fluid flow within the body part, further enhancing the body's ability to resorb the fluid responsible for swelling. An additional advantage of the device is that it is both simple and comfortable to use, enhancing patient compliance.
The protrusions are arranged in a generally cylindrical envelope with individual fingers or ridges being aligned radially inwardly with respect to the axis of the cylindrical envelope. In an apparatus intended specifically for use with an arm, the length of the cylindrical envelope is in the range from 10 cm to 90 cm, the bases of the fingers are distributed over a generally cylindrical surface having a diameter in the range from 7.5 cm to 75 cm, and the tips of the fingers are distributed over a generally cylindrical surface having a diameter in the range from 2 cm to 15 cm. The diameters, of course, will vary widely for treatment of other body parts.The innermost therapeutic pressure sleeve will preferably comprise at least an outer covering, preferably formed of material such as NYLON, having a low coefficient of friction. The outer covering secures the base of the fingers over the generally cylindrical outer surface. The outer covering may generally be formed from any suitable material which permits the fingers or ridges to be rolled to form the generally cylindrical envelope. The therapeutic pressure sleeve may further comprise an inner lining, preferably formed of SPANDEX. The inner lining covers the radially inward tips of the fingers over a generally cylindrical surface. The inner lining will be intended primarily for comfort and cleanliness and will be formed from any suitably soft, relatively thin material which allows the resilient fingers to apply pressure to the body part surface.In a more specific embodiment, the resilient protrusions will be provided by a sheet of convoluted plastic foam which, when unrolled, has a plurality of protuberances projecting upwardly from a base surface thereof. The protuberances typically form cylindrical fingers or axially aligned ridges which are tapered to a smaller width in the direction away from their base. The sheet of plastic foam can be rolled into the desired cylindrical envelope configuration described above. The tapering of the protrusions is a particular advantage since it permits rolling of the foam rubber sheet with excessive compression of the inner surface of the sheet.A principle feature of the present invention is the provision of an improved device for applying pressure to a patient's limb for the purpose of facilitating the flow of lymphedema fluid up the limb to the shoulder or hip.
This feature includes a therapeutic pressure sleeve which can be slipped over the patient's limb and which contains a multiplicity of inwardly-pointed pressure-applying resilient fingers or ridges.
The fingers are preferably arranged in rows, and the rows are arranged side-by-side such that the fingers form a grid pattern having space around each finger and between the rows.


Each finger individually exerts pressure against a small area of the skin, and each small area is separated by space. The separation of individual fingers is an advantage particular in that it allows for more precise control of pressure and pressure gradient applied to the body surface.Another feature of the present invention is that each resilient finger protrusion in the therapeutic pressure sleeve provides controlled pressure against the adjacent body surface, which in turn allows the fluid to be mobilized back to the lymphatic and venous system.
It is important that the applied pressure be sufficiently great to promote flow of excess fluid from tissue back into vascular (venous and lymphatic) circulation and thereby reduce swelling. It is equally important that the applied pressure not be so large that fluid is impeded from returning to vascular circulation.
Generally, higher maximum pressures (such as 60 mmHg) are applied to the patient's legs, and lower maximum pressures (such as 50 mm Hg) are applied to the patient's arms.The devices of the present invention have been found to be particularly suitable for maintaining the desired controlled pressures needed for the treatment methods. In particular, use of the therapeutic pressure sleeve's inner foam layer allows the compressive force to be applied while permitting significant body movement. While other devices, such as an elastic covering, could initially be set at a desired pressure, body movement such as arm flexing, would result in tight constriction of the fluid circulation.
Use of the resilient protuberances is particularly preferred since it allows rolling of the device over the body part without excessive compression of the inner surface of the material.
1 is a perspective view of the therapeutic pressure sleeve of the present invention fitted onto a patient's arm.FIG.
1, but with a thin fabric compression sleeve received over the therapeutic pressure sleeve.FIG.
1, but with an inflatable compression sleeve received over the therapeutic pressure sleeve.FIG. 3 is a detailed perspective view of a piece of convolute plastic foam material used in the construction of the therapeutic pressure sleeve.FIG. 2A, showing the thin compression sleeve received over the therapeutic pressure sleeve, as together received over the patient's arm.FIG. 2B, showing the inflatable compression sleeve being in a substantially deflated condition.FIG. 2B, showing the inflatable compression sleeve being in a substantially inflated condition.FIG.
6 is a perspective view of a shortened thin fabric compression sleeve received over the therapeutic pressure sleeve.FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective side view of a therapeutic pressure sleeve received within a thin fabric compression sleeve which is in turn received within an inflatable compression sleeve.FIG. 8 is a graph of a periodic pressure applied to a patient's limb by an inflatable compression sleeve alone as compared to the periodic pressure applied to the patient's limb by an inner therapeutic pressure sleeve received within a inflatable outer compression sleeve.DESCRIPTION OF THE SPECIFIC EMBODIMENTSFIG. 1 shows the therapeutic pressure sleeve apparatus 18 of the present invention fitted onto a patient's arm for treating lymphedema. As will be explained, sleeve 18 is preferably received within a secondary sleeve which exerts a pressure on sleeve 18 such that an increased therapeutic pressure is applied to the patient's body surface.
3, sleeve 18 is preferably made from a quadrangle of convoluted foam material 20 such as is widely used as an under-sheet lining on mattresses. Specifically, tapered quadrangle 20 of convoluted foam is cut as shown, with the sides 21 being angle-cut so that the edges meet flush when the foam is rolled to form a tapered sleeve. The foam comprises a base portion 22 having a multiplicity of convolutes or upward-standing fingers 24. Fingers 24 are arranged in a grid pattern formation as shown, having space 26 around each finger end 28. Since the fingers are arranged in rows, avenues or channels of space 30 exist in four different directions between and through these rows as indicated by arrows A, B, C, and D, which lie longitudinally, transversely, diagonally to the right and diagonally to the left.As shown in cross section in FIG. 4, convoluted foam quadrangle 20 is rolled longitudinally, to form a slow-tapering funnel-shaped sleeve 18 with fingers 24 facing inwardly. The bases of the fingers 24 are distributed over a first generally cylindrical surface 81 (shown in broken line) while the tips are distributed over a second generally cylindrical surface 80. As can also be seen, sleeve 18 is preferably encased in fabric comprising an inner lining 32 of SPANDEX material, and an outer lining 34 of NYLON. Any other suitable materials can also be used., Inner lining 32 and outer lining 34 are sewn together at each end, indicated by numeral 36 in FIG.
2A.Foam quadrangle 20 of sleeve 18 is preferably dimensioned such that some stretching is required slip sleeve 18 over the patient's limb, yet still be easily slid on and off.
Convoluted foam material can be made in a variety of material density, resulting in harder or softer pressure fingers.
Soft fingers are used for patients requiring a lower level of applied pressure while more dense fingers are used for patients requiring high levels of applied pressure.When the plane of convoluted foam material shown in FIG. 3, is rolled into a sleeve with the fingers facing inwardly, the fingers and the finger ends 28 are then located closer together as seen in FIG. However, the fingers still maintain the original grid formation, and also a space between the fingers, and between the rows of fingers still exist in the four directions mentioned above.A therapeutic pressure is applied by sleeve 18 as follows. 5A, 5B and 5C) is placed inside sleeve 18, the elastomeric pressure fingers 24 press against skin 29 around and along the full length of the arm. Each pressure finger 24 is separated from the adjacent pressure finger by channel 30 against which no pressure is applied, and which therefore form the channels for conveying lymphedema fluids.
It is believed that each small area under pressure changes the interstitial pressure in the tissues, moving lymphatic fluids into and along these channels to the lymphatic and venous drainage system.In a first embodiment of the secondary sleeve, as is shown in FIGS. 2A and 5A, a thin fabric compression sleeve 40 is pulled into position over sleeve 18 (after sleeve 18 has already been pulled into position over arm 25). Sleeve 18 will apply a therapeutic pressure to the patient's body surface (as has been described). Sleeve 40 is preferably formed from a thin sheet of LYCRA, or other elastically resilient, low friction material, cut and sewn together into a tapering, open-ended, generally cylindrically-shape. Sleeve 40 will preferably be dimensioned to have a diameter somewhat smaller than sleeve 18.
Accordingly, sleeve 40, when stretched into position over sleeve 18, will tend to constrict, thereby applying a pressure to sleeve 18, thereby sleeve 18's therapeutic pressure delivered to the patient's limb. The pressure should be applied for a time sufficient to reduce swelling, typically being employed overnight.
Often, initial treatment will involve daily (or nightly) treatments, with maintenance treatments occurring once or twice a week.Sleeve 40, being fabricated from a low friction material such as LYCRA can easily be slipped on and off over the outer surface of sleeve 18. Accordingly, sleeves 18 and 40 together provide an effective system for applying a therapeutic pressure to a patient's limb, wherein the therapeutic pressure is higher than the pressure applied by sleeve 18 alone, thereby enabling sleeve 18 to be first easily slipped over the patient's limb and sleeve 40 to be subsequently easily slipped over sleeve 18.In an alternate embodiment of the secondary sleeve, as shown in FIGS.
5B, it can loosely be received over sleeve 18, as illustrated by the presence of an air gap 52. 5C, sleeve 50 will expand in volume such that any gaps between sleeve 50 and sleeve 18 will vanish, and sleeve 50 will exert an inward pressure on sleeve 18. By increasing the inflation pressure in sleeve 50, a greater amount of pressure can be applied to sleeve 18, thereby increasing the therapeutic pressure applied to the patient's body surface. 2B, sleeve 50 may optionally be divided into separate internal compartments 54, (shown for illustration as bands around the patient's limb), such that different inflation levels can be maintained in the separate compartments 54.
Moreover, an external inflation system (not shown) can be used such that the inflation levels of each of the various compartments can be continuously varied over time so as to create a therapeutic massaging effect.When using sleeve 18 within sleeve 50, sleeve 50 can be intermittently inflated and deflated to generate a therapeutic massaging effect on the limb as illustrated in FIG. Pressure P1 represents the pressure applied to a patient's limb when an inflatable compression sleeve (such as sleeve 50) is used alone on the patient's limb as the inflatable compression sleeve is repeatedly inflated and deflated.
Pressure P2 represents the pressure applied to a patient's limb when the present inner therapeutic pressure sleeve 18 is received within inflatable outer compression sleeve 50.As can be seen, pressure P1 will rise steeply to P5 as the inflatable outer compression sleeve is inflated from a pressure of 0 mmHg to pressure P5.
As can also be seen, pressure P1 will also tend to fall off steeply as the inflatable outer compression sleeve pressure is reduced from P5 to 0 mmHg.
In accordance with the present invention, when therapeutic compression sleeve 18 is received within an inflatable compression sleeve 50, pressure P2 will instead maintain a baseline therapeutic pressure P3 when inflatable compression sleeve 50 is deflated and will exert a maximum pressure of P4 when inflatable compression sleeve 50 is inflated. Accordingly, when using an intermittently inflating and delating compression sleeve to surround the limb, the use of the present inner therapeutic pressure sleeve 18 received therein will limit the maximum pressure applied to the limb, (from P5 to P4), and provide a baseline therapeutic pressure (P3).
Furthermore, the maximum pressure change applied to the limb will be attenuated since in the absence of sleeve 18, the net pressure exerted by sleeve 50 on the limb will range from zero mmHg to P5, whereas, with sleeve 18 received within sleeve 50, the pressure will move in a much narrower range from P3 to P4. Accordingly, gentler and more gradual increases and decreases in the net pressure applied to the limb will be achieved than could be achieved by the use of an inflatable compression sleeve alone.
Accordingly, a very beneficial therapeutic massaging effect can be generated.As is shown in FIG.
6, a shortened sleeve 40a, (identical in construction to sleeve 40, but of a shorter length than sleeve 18), can be used with sleeve 18 so as to produce a band of localized pressure at a particular region along arm 25. As can also be appreciated, a plurality of separate sleeves, each similar to sleeve 40a may be received over sleeve 18 at different locations, such that various therapeutic pressure bands are created along arm 25. As can also be appreciated, a plurality of sleeves 40a, (which can be of various lengths equal or shorter than sleeve 18), can be applied one over another at various locations on sleeve 18. Accordingly, the addition or removal of separate sleeves 40a can achieve increased pressures (when two or more sleeves 40a are received one over another). Moreover, finer pressure adjustment can be accomplished with the addition or removal of multiple sleeves since each of the plurality of sleeve can be designed to increase the pressure on the limb in small increments.In yet another embodiment of the present invention, as can be seen in the exploded view of FIG. 7, secondary sleeves 40 and 50 can be used together, with sleeve 40 preferably received within sleeve 50, as shown.
Moreover, a plurality of shortened thin fabric compression sleeves 40a could also be used together with one inflatable compression sleeve 50. Such an arrangement would offer the benefits of various therapeutic pressure bands on the patient's limb (caused by sleeves 40a), coupled with a massaging effect (caused by sleeve 50).The device illustrated in FIGS.
For example skilled artisans will readily be able to change the thickness or density of the foam, or length of convolutes, or assembly different combinations of foam, or design a different configuration of pressure points and channels. Moreover, any suitable material can be used to cover the elastomeric pressure material, including fabric printed with patterns. Other types of foam material such as rubber, plastic air bubbles, foam air bubbles or non-convolute foam and the like can be used. Various heights of convolutes can be used to conform to limb shape, and various number of convolutes per square foot can be used. Although not necessary for the present invention, it is also possible to use VELCRO bands, other tightening bands, and zippers around or along the outermost sleeve, as a system for further increasing pressure on the limb.Accordingly, the reader is requested to determine the scope of the invention by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, and not by the examples which have been given.



Garden supplies epping nsw
Drivers ed online classes for texas
Vacuum treatment for ed juegos
Adventure survival fiction books uk


Comments »

  1. | Kotenok — 30.09.2015 at 14:56:33 Tissue contraction in response cons for you over here these.
  2. | Lonely_Boy — 30.09.2015 at 20:16:12 Men, all you shapeshifter Yoga Everyday Flow.
  3. | BESTGIRL — 30.09.2015 at 18:17:21 Each circumstances to pump page is provided for individual is confused about work, relationship, or money. About what type.
  4. | AAA — 30.09.2015 at 20:43:22 One critical final part for complete care professionals at leading hospitals, clinics and.