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admin | Category: Ed Treatment Exercise | 23.02.2016
For easy to grow roses, only choose disease resistant roses that are less enticing to disease and pests. That way you can still enjoy growing roses without worrying too much about keeping rose diseases at bay. If you live where one or more rose diseases, such as black spot, powdery mildew, and rust, are common, you should plant disease resistant varieties. Apart from practicing good rose gardening hygiene and choosing disease resistant plants, the best way to keep your roses from contracting diseases is to limit their exposure to things that spread them.
I know you can't do much about the air, but you can help prevent water from splashing them, not rain of course, and you can also limit their exposure to the soil. Diseases are also spread by direct contact with diseased plant material, so get rid of those things right away.
Applying a good layer of mulch prevents water from splashing onto rose plants from the soil during rain and irrigation infecting them with disease spores. One of the most important things you can do to make caring for your roses as simple as possible is to spend time with them. Taking a daily stroll through your garden lets you catch and correct problems quickly and easily.
Eliminate and destroy badly diseased and infested plants the minute you spot them and don't add them to the compost pile.
The Knockout rose is the first rose specifically bred for virtual immuntity to black spot, a fungal disease that plagues roses throughout North America.
The roses listed below are a selection of good roses for disease resistance per the American Rose Society which I am a member of. Many gardeners, including me, like growing roses in pots for decorating our patios, decks and balconies.
Given the appropriate size of the pot, any garden rose can be planted and happily growing in a pot.
I do recommend that you select one of the smaller rose varieties for growing in a pot though.
To plant a bare-root or a small container rose in a pot, you need a good grade commercial potting soil for roses.
Make sure you use potting soil instead of soil from your garden, because the soil must be light and well-draining to ensure a balance of air and water.
Place the rose inthe center of your pot, making certain that the final soil level will be 2-3 inches blow thee rim of the pot. Use your hands to work the potting soil around the roots in order to eleminate any air pockets.
Feed your potted rose with a liquid fertilizer used at half recommended strengt, about every week or ten days. Every other year, remove the rose from the pot, and using a garden knife, trim off 3 inches of soil and roots from both sides and the bottom of the soil mass. Plants, like people, are searching for partners that will make them look good; bring out their best qualities, and share their space with equanimity, neither overpowering nor paling in comparison.
There are several considerations when choosing suitable plant companions: aesthetics, growing conditions, and plant health. Good companions should enjoy the same growing conditions but not compete too aggressively with the roses.


Many sun-loving annuals such as heliotropes (Heliotropium), summer-snapdragon (Angelonia), lantana (Lantana), and verbena (Verbena) hold up well throughout the summer and fill the space among roses nicely. Good companions are said to enhance one another's growth or, in some way, protect each other from harm.
Remember to plant companions at least one foot away from your roses so that you do not disturb their roots. Generous support for the Home Gardening Center has been provided by Kenneth and Ellen Roman. If you are also looking for flowers gardening especially roses gardening, this post definitely will helps you how to do it properly.
Once you know the space available, you will be able to work out how many rose bushes you need to plant.
For part of the year roses are not particularly attractive and can even be a little bare, so it’s good to have some other plants to fill in the gaps in the rose garden.
At some point, every rose gardener will encounter black spot, Japanese beetles, rose chafers and mildew. Plants with tall spires complement the wide, cup-shaped flowers of roses, while perennials and shrubs with pale green, silver, or purple leaves accentuate the sumptuous rose blossoms.
The feathery purple and blue-gray catmint (Nepeta) offsets any pale pink rose beautifully, and its wispy spires gracefully camouflage any blemishes that may occur on the rose's foliage. They all have modest water requirements and will benefit from the heavy feeding regime that roses demand. Some companion plants may help discourage pests without the use of chemicals since there are natural substances in their leaves, flowers, or roots that repel insects. Scented geraniums (Pelargonium), rue (Ruta), feverfew (Tanacetum), parsley (Petroselinum), and thyme (Thymus) all may help ward off Japanese beetles and aphids.
This is also dictated by the type of rose you choose, and some can be placed quite close together, whereas others, such as climbers, may need to be as much as twelve feet apart. Companion planting can also extend the flowering season by providing color between the main flushes of rose bloom in early summer and fall.Some plants just seem to be made for each other.
Another component of companion planting, one often referred to in organic gardening, is selecting companions that ward off pests, improve the soil, or in other ways have a beneficial effect on plant health. Plants that are too aggressive may crowd the roses and take too much water and nutrients from the soil. Always maintain good air circulation around your plants to help prevent attacks from pests and diseases.
There are many difference factors that you need to take into consideration when planning your rose garden, including more than just what color the flowers will be.
If your rose garden area is small, it may be wise to choose miniature roses for the best effect. Perhaps you want to create a pattern with different colored roses, or just find roses that will complement the color of your house.
Chose the right roses for your growing conditions and you’re half way to having a spectacular rose garden.
Formerly rose curator at Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Scanniello offers expert advice on how to create a stunning garden with roses and companions plants, or, as stated in his introduction, “how to get roses to play well with others”.
The feathery purple and blue-gray catmint (Nepeta) offsets any pale pink rose beautifully, and its wispy spires gracefully camouflage any blemishes that may occur on the rose’s foliage.


In fact, members of the onion family such as chives, ornamental alliums, and edible onions, are rumored to increase the perfume of roses, ward off aphids, and prevent black spot. Try ornamental and culinary sage (Salvia), anise-hyssop (Agastache), Russian-sage (Perovskia), lavender, yarrow (Achillea), oregano (Origanum), catmint, and calamint (Calamintha). With proper care of your roses, you will be able to surround them with many interesting companions. Many people find growing red and white roses alternately in a rose garden makes a pretty, patterned effect.
Traditionally, lavender (Lavandula), catmint, lady's mantle (Alchemilla), and tall growing pinks (Dianthus) all make good partners.
Oddly enough, tomatoes allegedly prevent black spot, but not many people will be inclined to combine roses and tomatoes. Beside that, you can see several pictures related with roses gardening that can help you to imagine how your roses garden will be. If your house is a shade of peach, however, you might like to choose a mixture of peach and yellow roses instead. Good companions also act as living mulches, suppressing weeds and lightly shading the soil, keeping their roots nice and cool.
Traditionally, lavender (Lavandula), catmint (Nepeta), lady’s mantle (Alchemilla), and tall growing pinks (Dianthus) all make good partners. Four-o’ clocks (Mirabilis) and larkspur (Consolida) are said to act as decoys by attracting rose-loving Japanese beetles to eat their poisonous leaves.
This is just a matter of knowing what type of rose bush you have and then gaining a little experience. Good companions also act as living mulches—suppressing weeds and lightly shading the soil, keeping their roots nice and cool.Good rose companions should enjoy the same growing conditions but not compete too aggressively with the roses. Plants that are too aggressive may crowd the roses and absorb too much water and nutrients from the soil.Many sun-loving annuals such as heliotropes (Heliotropium), summer-snapdragon (Angelonia), lantana (Lantana), verbena (Verbena) and million bells petunia (Calibrachoa) hold up well throughout the summer and fill the space among roses nicely.
They all have modest water requirements and will benefit from the heavy feeding regime that roses demand.Good companions are said to enhance one another’s growth or, in some way, protect each other from harm.
I’d say there’s no sense in having a rose garden if you’re not going to enjoy it, but there’s really no way that could happen. In fact, members of the onion family such as chives, ornamental alliums, and edible onions, are rumored to increase the perfume of roses, ward off aphids, and prevent black spot.Herbs and other aromatic plants make wonderful rose companions. Scented geraniums (Pelargonium), rue (Ruta), feverfew (T anacetum), parsley (Petroselinum), and thyme (Thymus) all may help ward off Japanese beetles and aphids. Try ornamental and culinary sage (Salvia), anise-hyssop (Agastache), Russian-sage (Perovskia), lavender (Lavandula), yarrow (Achillea), oregano (Origanum), catmint (Nepeta) and calamint (Calamintha).
Yarrow (Achillea) may attract ladybugs who in turn feed on aphids.Remember to plant rose companions at least one foot away from your roses so that you do not disturb their roots.
The thorn-resistant kidskin leather molds to your hands, and stress points at thumb and fingertips are reinforced for long-lasting wear.Create a healthy open structure for your roses with good pruning practices.



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