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admin | Category: What Causes Ed 2016 | 11.01.2014
This is an awesome Christian series loosely based on the story of Jacob, Leah and Rachel from the Bible.
It’s a love story and a war story and a history lesson and completely and utterly addictive. WeAreTeachers recently polled over 200 teachers about the best books in their classroom libraries, from their favorite read-alouds and fiction books to the top science, humor and poetry titles. After our longest hiatus so far, Jonathan is back from Italy and Gary is back from Readercon, and we ramble on about such questions as whether modern SF can be characterized as optimistic or pessimistic, how some stories survive as influences despite their obvious flaws, whether modern SF holds on to some of its cherished myths even when they no longer seem feasible, what we’re reading these days, and our own forthcoming public podcast at MidAmericon next month. Before Coode Street goes on hiatus for a few weeks when each of us travel to various exotic realms, we address a question which Jonathan raised about new editions of work by Clifford Simak and Tom Reamy—namely, what happens to the work of older writers in a world in which the midlist has all but disappeared? Then we chat a bit about our plans for Coode Street at MidAmericon in August, what we’re reading now, and what we’re looking forward to reading on the break. We’ve already lined up some special guests and just as soon as we have an official time we will let you all know. We also have announced that we will be taking an intermittent hiatus during July and August. From the small coastal town of Senjan, notorious for its pirates, a young woman sets out to find vengeance for her lost family. The trading ship that carries them is commanded by the accomplished younger son of a merchant family, ambivalent about the life he’s been born to live. If you’re keen to avoid spoilers, we recommend reading the book before listening to the episode. We encourage all of our listeners to leave comments here and we will do our best to respond as soon as possible. Next monthThe Coode Street Roundtable will return at the end of June with a discussion of Madeline Ashby’s Company Town. This week, we reminisce briefly about six years of the Coode Street Podcast (an anniversary we overlooked a few weeks ago), and then segue, after a few brief diversionary rambles, into a discussion of the books we are both looking forward to in the next six months or so, touching upon new books by Angela Slatter, John Crowley, Peter Beagle, Jeffrey Ford, Kameron Hurley, Alastair Reynolds, Ursula K. Although Jonathan wasn’t able to join us on this one,they got into some fascinating stories about Thomas Pynchon, Octavia Butler, Harlan’s famous house (including the “grotto”), the role of small-press publishers in the history of the field, and what it all looks like from the perspective of a legendary writer in his 81st year. Having made the unforgivable mistake of winning a war without the proper permission, Captain Caroline Sula has been exiled to Earth, a distant backwater far from the heart of Empire, the sort of place where careers go to die.
With this novel-length adventure featuring one of his most popular characters, Nebula winner Walter Jon Williams returns to the universe the Praxis in fine style! This week writer, editor and now publisher Jack Dann, a long-time friend of the podcast, joins Jonathan and Gary to discuss his role in launching new small press publishing imprint PS Australia and his forthcoming anthology, Dreaming in the Dark. As always, we’d like to thank Jack for being a guest on the podcast, and hope you all enjoy the episode! The Hugo nominations came out last week.  As is always the case, they are the tabulated nominations from a wide variety of people. Given that, and given the various parties involved these days, I thought I might list some of what went on my own ballot, if only because it might be of some interest to people as a reading list. Of the books listed, Stan Robinson’s smart, thoughtful, challenging Aurora was my favourite of the year. This month Coode Street co-host Gary Wolfe joins us to discuss Into Everwhere, the latest novel from Paul McAuley.
The Jackaroo, those enigmatic aliens who claim to have come to help, gave humanity access to worlds littered with ruins and scraps of technology left by long-dead client races. The dissolute scion of a powerful merchant family, and a woman living in seclusion with only her dog and her demons for company, have become infected by a copies of a powerful chunk of alien code. During the podcast Jonathan incorrectly says Paul McAuley’s next novel, Austral, is due in late 2016. The Coode Street Roundtable will return at the end of May with a discussion of Guy Gavriel Kay’s Children of Earth and Sky. As we head into our third straight week without a guest on the podcast, we confront our lack of organisation with a smile and a nod.


This week’s ramble touches upon a bunch of issues, from Hugo nominations and awards (of course) to what it takes to be called a major science fiction writer, the need for more translations of non-English language science fiction, the advantages and disadvantages of “fix-ups,” “story suites,” and collections of linked stories, and whether SF has developed a kind of informal hierarchy favoring American and British SF, followed by Australian and Canadian writers, and leaving most other world science fiction as a kind of niche interest (which we dearly hope is beginning to change). Hard at work here (well, actually sort of goofing off right now) on the next Infinity book.
Coming up are some terrific new stories by Kij Johnson, Walter Jon Williams, Lavie Tidhar and others.
We discussed his sometimes controversial approach to alternate history, the question of borrowing tropes from pulp fiction in portraying serious events such as the Holocaust and terrorism, the importance of American SF writers like Cordwainer Smith, his own experiences growing up in a kibbutz and what he read there, and the never-ending question of genre literature vs “literary” fiction.
I have just put the last touches to Drowned Worlds: Tales from the Anthropocene and Beyond which is due from Solaris in July. Drowned Worlds asks fifteen of the top science fiction and fantasy writers working today to look to the future, to ask how will we survive?
In the new fantasy from the award-winning author of the Riddle-Master Trilogy, a young man comes of age amid family secrets and revelations, and transformative magic. Hidden away from the world by his mother, the powerful sorceress Heloise Oliver, Pierce has grown up working in her restaurant in Desolation Point.
The Coode Street Roundtable will return at the end of April with a discussion of Paul McAuley’s Into Everywhere. The Roundtable always features spoilers, so if you’re planning on reading along with this, grab a copy of Paul’s new novel and get ready for the last weekend in April! Anne Juliana Gonzaga became a Servant of Mary following the death of her husband, Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria in 1595, after receiving a vision of the Madonna, to whom her parents had prayed to cure her of a childhood illness? Get your Overcoming Overwhelm printable guide and see change immediately!I don’t keep my love of Scottish fiction a secret. From one mother who has a young son she forces to learn the saxophone and Italian to athletes, widows, and artists. As usual, any topic that you might find uninteresting will soon turn into another topic entirely. As always, we hope you enjoy the episode, and hope you don’t miss the podcast too much!
We’re going to be at MidAmericon 2, the 74th World Science Fiction Convention, in Kansas City, Missouri over the weekend of 17-21 August!
We’ll also be recording it as a podcast so that everyone who can’t be there will still be able to catch up with the show. Gary is awak on ICFA business, so with one thing or another, we can’t seem to work out timing. The Roundtable is a monthly podcast from Coode Street Productions where panelists James Bradley, Ian Mond, and Jonathan Strahan, joined by occasional special guests, discuss a new or recently released science fiction or fantasy novel. And further east, a boy trains to become a soldier in the elite infantry of the khalif–to win glory in the war everyone knows is coming. Le Guin, Christopher Priest, Yoon Ha Lee, Connie Willis, Ken MacLeod, Nisi Shawl, China Mieville, Michael Swanwick and others, along the way touching upon colonialism and culture, the role of the stand-alone novella, how contemporary writers are dealing with Lovecraft, and what anthologies to look out for. Next week, a new episode of the Coode Street Roundtable and a new episode of the main show. Gary attending the Nebula weekend, so with one thing or another, we can’t seem to work out timing. But although people have found new uses for alien technology, that technology may have found its own uses for people. Driven to discover what it wants from them, they become caught up in a conflict between a policeman allied to the Jackaroo and the laminated brain of a scientific wizard, and a mystery that spans light years and centuries.
Do we face a period of dramatic transition and then a new technology-influenced golden age, or a long, slow decline? Wolfe join Jonathan and Ian to discuss Kingfisher, the latest novel from World Fantasy Award and Mythopoeic Award winner Patricia A. One day, unexpectedly, strangers pass through town on the way to the legendary capital city.


Next month our intrepid readers will come together to discuss the new novel from Paul McAuley, Into Everywhere. So as a follow-up to my post on must read book series, I’m talking about all things Scotland. My sister and I read it over spring break during high school, sitting side by side on the sofa.
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It’s possible there may be an episode during this time, but honestly, recording podcasts while on holidays in Tuscany just doesn’t seem likely, does it? An early storm huffed and puffed and knocked the power out part way through a ramble on awards and longevity (or something). Someone is forging evidence that could send her to prison, while another group is rummaging around in her past. Humanity is about to discover why the Jackaroo came to help us, and how that help is shaping the end of human history. Sea water is flooding the streets of Florida, island nations are rapidly disappearing beneath the waves, the polar icecaps are a fraction of what they once were, and distant, exotic places like Australia are slowly baking in the sun.
Swim the drowned streets of Boston, see Venice disappear beneath the waves, meet a woman who’s turned herself into a reef, traverse the floating garbage cities of the Pacific, search for the elf stones of Antarctica, or spend time in the new, dark Dust Bowl of the American mid-west. LinkedIn tells me that Coode Street Productions started up in March 1997, which would mean that it would be twenty years old next year.
Here are the picks (both from what I’ve read and researched) of the best Scottish fiction. I'm a Parenting Visionary, Birth Order and Personality Theory junkie, addicted to Diet Coke, and could survive on baby hugs, cheese, bread and peanut butter. Our newsletter is loaded with information on our newest book selections, helpful professional development and more. See the future for what it is: challenging, exciting, filled with adventure, and more than a little disturbing.
Ferlinghetti when, at ninety years of age, he read at City Lights Books in San Francisco, and signed that very edition of the magazine for me, inspiring me all over again.A A On this website, you'll not only find photos, videos and more that have to do with my life as an author, but other things that are important to me, too. The people who enslaved him are now in positions of power, and sinister forces are also at work against the royal household. A I enjoy hearing from people who've read my work, attended one of my workshops or conferences, or whom I've met at one event or another.A  I'm always interested in people who live somewhere I don't or think differently than I do. I spend some time every day if I can on social networking sites, because the world and the people in it are all interesting. Oh, well, the relationship didn't work, but I did get to see some beautiful places.Photo taken of me by a local (unknown) photographer when I was 23 years oldA Once, I was on the northern border of Greece with my twelve-year-old son during a time when it was a war zone. We were there because I needed to attend a very important book convention in Salonika, and didn't want to leave my son behind. The next week, a hijacker from one of the warring factions killed a young Greek passenger on the same route we'd taken only the week before.
To see some really adorable ones who posed for me while reading one of my books, check out the FUN AND FREEBIES PAGEA Dancing at my engagement party. It's fine if you think your mom's is better, but still --- this is not a boast ---- my tiramisu and salsa puttanesca are legendary. A  A I keep in touch with many of my former pupils, some from as far back as thirty years ago.



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