We've already glimpsed how one app developer was able to graduate his miniature DJ turntable iPhone app into a realistic, life-size audio mixer for the iPad. Arguably, piano and DJ apps aren't likely to be primary uses for the iPad, but both of these early examples illustrate how a change in screen size means much more than larger images. Of course, piano and DJ apps are both examples of apps trying to graphically represent and replace actual objects in the real world. In the coming weeks, it will be interesting to see which iPad apps really benefit from the transition, which ones don't, and how we adjust our expectations of what "apps" can deliver. I’ve recently posted an article about some fun piano games and while I was researching that particular topic, I found this article. October 12, 2014 Following the post on iPad Apps for Music Education I received a couple of requests to feature a post on iPad apps for teaching and learning piano. In a similar example, app developer Melvin Rivera shares a handful of final screenshots of his piano training app Nota, reconfigured for the iPad.
In both examples, I would make the case that the difference between the original iPhone app and its iPad counterpart is a difference between novelty and practicality. I was thrilled to post it here mainly because I’ve been recommending some apps to my students.


And because I don’t know any that I would recommend I crowdsourced the topic on my personal learning network and got a lot of feedback from music teachers. They can be an excellent addition to the reading materials and resources that are already in a piano playing class. As a beginner, you’ll likely start with proper posture, layout of the piano keys, and very basic music theory. It was important for me to have as much feature parity between the two devices but at the same time I did not want to be limited by that.
Whether the iPad will do a better job than the iPhone when it comes to representing abstract data (your tweets, Facebook account, Internet radio stations) remains to be seen.
Those apps can be used when they’re at home and just want to do something productive and fun. I’ll be adding more post here about a wide variety of topics associated with piano playing and piano lessons, so just keep yourself updated.
Beyond learning a new skill, playing music has been shown to relieve stress and improve your focus. From there, you can move onto sightreading, dynamics, advanced theory, and maybe even composing your own music!


Piano Apprentice is a lightweight, highly portable 25-key keyboard with built-in stereo speakers that deliver authentic piano sound and keys that respond to your touch.
Some apps will just be more practical on the small screen--or more specifically, on a small device.
It's easy to follow along as acclaimed piano instructor Scott Houston, aka the Piano Guy, appears on the screen demonstrating how to play while the actual keys on Piano Apprentice light up, showing you where to place your hands. Yelp for iPad could be amazing, but it's the kind of app you want in your pocket, not on your coffee table. I love how the technology has extended its helpful arms to improve music learning especially to aspiring pianists.
These fun apps are quite interesting and can significantly help students learn playing the piano well.
This is the paradigm of the iPad design, it took me several iterations of the design to come to this conclusion.



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