The slim and highly portable Yamaha NP-V80 is a more powerful version of the Yamaha NP-V60: with two extra internal speakers this digital piano is perfect for beginners or those who want something highly portable. The 76-key Yamaha NP-V80 is a light-weighted piano – relatively common at this end of the price spectrum and whilst there is a “graded soft touch keyboard” that attempts to reflect the heavier-depression on low notes on the piano, clearly you need to invest more in a fully-weighted or heavy-weighted digital piano to achieve true piano likeness.  The keys don’t depress as much as piano keys and some people find them a little plasticky but the up-side is that there is a real smoothness moving between the keys. People who tend to buy pianos like the Yamaha NP-V80 are usually beginners, those looking for a synth to plug neatly into a computer or those who don’t have a great deal of space to put a larger instrument.  Specifically in Yamaha’s Piagerro range, the NP Vxx digital pianos are more slimline and weigh less than the Yamaha NP-11 and Yamaha NP-31 digital pianos. Those who are considering purchasing the Yamaha NP-V80 may also consider the Korg microPIANO or Gear4Music PDP 220.  If you’re looking to upgrade to something a little more piano like, you may also consider the Casio CDP-120, Casio CDP-220 or Casio PX-130, the Yamaha P95 or the Korg SP170. With a rich piano tone, powerful amplification and a great touch, the Yamaha YDP-181 is sits at the top of the Yamaha Arius range and is a perfect digital piano for intermediate to more advanced pianists. Yamaha digital pianos are widely considered to be the best digital pianos in the market ahead of companies like Kurzweil and Roland. Featuring 128-note polyphony (allowing you to play multiple notes at once with no loss in sound quality) and 20W+20W amplification played through two 16cm speakers, it’s certainly the most powerful in the Arius (YDP) range. The Yamaha YDP-181 houses 14 voices (4 more than on more junior models) and two headphone jacks. The 88-key Yamaha YDP-181, like the majority of models in the Arius range, is a medium-weighted piano (see touch-weight in the terminology section) and features a “graded hammer (GH)” keyboard action meaning the keys in the left-hand are slightly harder to depress than those in the right, as on an acoustic piano.
The ‘furniture-style’ Arius (YDP) range all feature full pedal-boards giving the digital pianos a very real ‘proper’ piano feel.
There is an LED-display on the Yamaha YDP-181 to make navigation of different settings slightly easier and a USB flashdrive input (alongside MIDI input and output ports).
Those who are considering purchasing the Yamaha YDP-181 may also consider a number of different options including the Yamaha CLP-430 Clavinova (albeit a considerable step-up cost-wise), or the Casio PX-850 or Yamaha P-155 if you’re considering a portable alternative (it has the GH graded hammer action and the AWM dynamic stereo sampling but significantly less amplification).
The 88-key Yamaha P-35 digital piano is essentially a ‘stripped back’ version of some of the more advanced models in the P-Series range and is specifically designed to appeal to the entry-level pianist in emerging markets.
Yamaha’s P-series digital pianos are their portable stage pianos that combine a good quality piano sound with a decent touch: they feel more like ‘proper’ pianos than the Piaggero range.
The Yamaha P-35 digital piano is essentially a ‘stripped back’ version of some of the more advanced models in the P-series range. The 88-key Yamaha P-35 is a ‘weighted’ piano (see touch-weight in the terminology section) and whilst the keyboard is “graded hammer standard” – Yamaha’s entry-level ‘graded’ hammer action meaning that keys in the left-hand are slightly harder to depress than those in the right – clearly you need to invest more in a fully-weighted or heavy-weighted digital piano to achieve true piano likeness.
People who tend to buy pianos like the Yamaha P-35 are usually beginners, those looking for a synth to plug neatly into a computer or those who don’t have a great deal of space to put a larger instrument. I’ve just put an order in for one of these and was really impressed when we tried it out. The 76-key Yamaha NP-31 is a light-weighted piano – relatively common at this end of the price spectrum and whilst there is a “graded soft touch keyboard” that attempts to reflect the heavier-depression on low notes on the piano, clearly you need to invest more in a fully-weighted or heavy-weighted digital piano to achieve true piano likeness.  The keys don’t depress as much as piano keys but the up-side is that there is a real smoothness moving between the keys. People who tend to buy pianos like the Yamaha NP-31 are usually beginners, those looking for a synth to plug neatly into a computer or those who don’t have a great deal of space to put a larger instrument. Those who are considering purchasing the Yamaha NP-31 may also consider the Korg microPIANO or Gear4Music PDP 220.  If you’re looking to upgrade to something a little more piano like, you may also consider the Casio CDP 120, Casio CDP 220 or Casio PX 130, the Yamaha P95 or the Korg SP170. The Yamaha P-105 is a lighter-weight and more durable upgrade to the Yamaha P-95 but what really sets it apart from its competitors is its rich piano sound that make it such a good instrument for beginners and advanced pianists alike. The Yamaha P-105 is essentially an upgrade to the Yamaha P-95 and like its earlier cousin before it, it’s the sound quality (particularly that of the piano voice) that sets the Yamaha P-105 digital piano apart from its competitors. The 88-key Yamaha P-105, like the earlier Yamaha P-95 model, is a medium weighted piano (see touch-weight in the terminology section) and whilst the keyboard is “graded hammer standard” – Yamaha’s perfectly fine entry-level ‘graded hammer action’ (meaning that keys in the left-hand are slightly harder to depress than those in the right) – it’s probably the one thing that could have been upgraded to achieve a more true piano likeness. People with a whole range of requirements from their digital piano purchase the Yamaha P-105, from those who are beginners right through to experienced gigging musicians and concert pianists who use it as a warm-up instrument. Those who are considering purchasing the Yamaha P-105 may also consider the Casio PX-150 and the Kurzweil SP4-7.


My Yamaha P105 arrived earlier this week and compared to my cousin who’s got the P95, the piano sound on this is absolutely light years better.
Definitely a marked improvement on the 95 and a big step up from the Casio keyboard I’ve just passed onto my baby brother!
The Yamaha YDP-142 couples a natural touch with one of the most authentic piano sounds available (courtesy of the new Pure CF sound engine) all in a light and compact ‘furniture-style’ body. The Yamaha YDP-142 is essentially an upgrade to the Yamaha YDP-141 before it and the main improvements are around the quality of sound (specifically the piano sound) it produces. The other main improvement is the move to 128-note polyphony (compared to 64-note polyphony on the Yamaha YDP-141) that allows you to play multiple notes at once with no loss in sound quality. The 88-key Yamaha YDP-142, like its earlier cousin the Yamaha YDP-141, is a medium weighted piano (see touch-weight in the terminology section).
Those who purchase ‘furniture-style’ pianos often have a clear idea in mind of where the digital piano will sit in a certain room. There are a number of instruments those who are considering purchasing the Yamaha YDP-142 digital piano might look at.
There are a couple of good comparison threads on Pianoworld too comparing the Yamaha YDP-142 with other instruments.
The Casio PX-350 digital piano is the 2013 upgrade to the Casio PX 330 featuring an improved hammer action for more responsive playing and an improved sound quality.
Casio digital pianos have historically catered for the lower-cost end of the market, bridging the gap between the keyboards that they’re famous for and digital pianos. The Casio PX-350 is the 2013 upgrade to the earlier PX 330 and features several real improvements on well-thought of earlier models. The Casio PX-350, like the majority of the Privia range, is a medium-weighted piano – the most cost-efficient option but behind a fully-weighted or heavy-weighted digital piano in terms of real piano likeness. People who tend to buy pianos like the Casio PX-350 are usually more experienced pianists who gig and don’t have a great deal of space to put a larger instrument. Those who are considering purchasing the Casio PX-350 might also consider the Casio PX 3, Casio PX 330, Yamaha DGX 640 and the Kurzweil SP4-7. The re-creation of the piano sound by Yamaha’s AWM dynamic stereo sampling is what sets it apart from its competitors. Whilst some argue that the GH action makes the keys too hard to press, at Digital Piano Compare we like how much firmer and more stable it is than the GHS action and also how much quieter and less ‘clicky’ the keys are. Three stable pedals are mounted: a damper pedal, a soft pedal and a sostenuto (sustain) pedal and these allow for more expressive playing.
It’s particularly popular in secondary education as a classroom digital piano given how well it replicates an acoustic piano feel. In terms of where this digital piano sits within the Yamaha range, there’s still quite a step up to the Clavinova range that feature 30W+30W amplification, an improved graded hammer action and the highly impressive RGE (real grand expression) sound engine that produces a stunning piano sound.
They are digital pianos suitable for competent performers right through to advanced pianists and range in price from around ?350 through to ?1,050. Targeted to compete with the Casio PX-135, the Yamaha P-35 has 10 instrument sounds including a decent piano sound (featured on the one “grand piano” button.
The Yamaha P-35 has been specifically designed to capture demand in emerging economies for entry-level digital pianos and where space within properties is at a premium: it’s an unfortunate consequence that you can’t attach a traditional 3-pedal unit to the Yamaha P-35. As mentioned previously, this style of digital pianos are specifically designed to appeal to the entry-level market in emerging economies.
If you’re looking to upgrade to something a little more piano-like, you may also consider the Yamaha P-95.
The piano sound has a richer, thicker tone than something like the Casio PX-135 and the 128-note polyphony (allowing you to play multiple notes at once with no loss in sound quality) coupled with a 7W x 7W amp and 4 speakers ensure that it’s well projected.


That said, the overall touch has a gentle “springy” feel to it and like the Yamaha P95 before it, the build quality of the instrument is certainly the highest amongst its immediate competitors.
Its durability and light weight (c12kg) make it a great digital piano prior to getting into the realms of more static digital pianos.
If you’re looking for an almost-identical instrument, then the difference is actually not that much compared to the earlier Yamaha P-95 model. Featuring Yamaha’s Pure CF sound engine, the technology that re-produces the piano-like sound, it’s a noticeable upgrade to the AWM dynamic sampling found on the Yamaha YDP-141. The keyboard is “graded hammer standard (GHS)”, Yamaha’s entry-level ‘graded hammer action’, meaning that keys in the left-hand are slightly harder to depress than those in the right. Specifically, the Yamaha YDP-142 is usually bought by individuals who have been playing for a couple of years (and are looking to take a step up from a keyboard or smaller instrument) or institutions who want to put a digital piano in a warm-up or practice room.
They include the Yamaha DGX-640 or Yamaha DGX-650 from Yamaha or potentially the Casio PX-750 if the ‘furniture-style’ casing isn’t important.
Casio make a lot of their own components and hence costs have historically been lower than competitors.
As with previous models, the 8W x 8W amp speakers deliver good layering and there are 250 different instruments to choose from alongside 17 track General MIDI playback and 128-note polyphony – double the amount you’d find on a Yamaha DGX 640 in a similar price bracket.
As with the PX 330, the Casio PX-350 features their “tri-sensor scaled hammer action” (three touch sensors on each note) and the responsiveness has been further enhanced with an improved, heavier replica hammer-action.
Like the Casio PX 330 before, the 2013 update is certainly starting to pick up rave reviews from amateurs and professionals alike.
What makes Yamaha digital pianos so popular in comparison to other makes is their quality of construction and tone-quality. They’re perfect instruments for beginners through to experienced players and range in price from around ?650 through to ?1,400. Whilst the Yamaha YDP-181 didn’t receive an upgrade to Yamaha’s Pure CF sound engine in 2013 in the way the Yamaha YDP-161 did (to the Yamaha YDP-162), it still produces an excellent rich piano tone. This piano sound has been improved too in comparison to the P95, particularly on the bottom- and top-end notes. This is great for those starting out on their digital piano journey but for more experienced players the “graded hammer (GH)” action on the more expensive models in the Arius range deliver a truer piano likeness. The entry-level models of the Casio Celviano range might also come into contention, namely the Casio AP-220, Casio AP-245 or Casio AP-250. At the time of writing, their range currently comprises a few entry level digital pianos (CDP range), the Privia range (of which the Casio PX-350 is one) and the Celviano range but nothing more expensive than ?1,100. The most noticeable improvement is on the main piano sound that sounds significantly more realistic. The mock ivory- and ebony-feel keys make for a fantastic 88-key digital piano that includes USB input to boot. The Yamaha P-105 also features 10 ‘pianist styles’ that turn simple chords into a more interesting accompaniment: something that’s probably most appealing to beginner musicians. That said, the overall touch has a gentle “springy” feel to it and the build quality of the instrument is certainly the highest amongst its immediate competitors.
Casio products are best-suited for beginners and those on a particularly tight budget although more recent products have been raved about by more experienced and internationally famous musicians.



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