The paleo diet for athletes by prof. loren cordain,burn belly fat bodybuilding,diet program to lose weight in 2 weeks yahoo - For Begninners

02.06.2016
Our friends at 180 Nutrition share their Q&A with Dr Kieron Rooney on whether or not athletes should fat or carb load! With all the confusion out there on whether athletes should be eating more dietary fats or carbohydrates for enhanced performance, who better to ask than Dr Kieron Rooney; a biochemist from the University of Sydney.
He will be hosting Sydney’s June event featuring low carb for athletic performance expert Professor Jeff Volek – “Nutrition for Optimising Athletic Performance”. Dr Steve Phinney’s original work in the ’80s set the scene for endurance athletes to be primary participants and lots of the big name stories coming out are endurance athletes as well… It may just be though that the non-endurance athletes are yet to be convinced.
If we think of an endurance event, then the conventional wisdom is that your ultimate performance will be reliant on a steady supply of carbohydrate during the event. My understanding of the LCHF approach is that you play the long game – live LCHF and adapt your system away from this reliance on carbohydrates, then the fuels (and ultimately performance) you are relying on during your event will less likely to be glycogen and carbohydrate intake as you are tapping into the larger fuel reserves of body fat. A key question then is in ultra-endurance events and the like, where no doubt some food is necessary – what do you eat? If you are not in nutritional ketosis but are doing a “lower” (rather than “low” carb approach (somewhere on the continuum of less than 130g a day but not quite as low as the 50g often reported as the threshold for nutritional ketosis) then you are likely developing a system that is still reliant on carbohydrate fuels, but because you have gone lower carb they are not around, and because you are not in ketosis then the ketones aren’t around to meet the energy demand and so you are in danger of not meeting energy needs in your exercise effort. Prof Jeff Volek is a professor at The Ohio State University where he teaches and leads a research team that explores the physiologic impact of various dietary and exercise regimens and nutritional supplements. Kieron’s wealth of knowledge is incredible and he has a long standing interest in the basic science behind low carbohydrate diets. Do the benefits of a LCHF (low carb high fat) diet only apply to endurance athletes in sports?
This will primarily be met by glycogen stores, perhaps gluconeogenesis in the liver and then anything else you can consume in goos and drinks and the like during the event to sustain blood glucose levels and “spare” your muscle glycogen stores. IF we are looking for signs that LCHF may have a place in the development of athletes outside of traditional endurance events, my reading of the LCHF approach is that a state of nutritional ketosis results in a preservation of muscle mass.


If we are focussing on athlete performance in their endurance event then my reading of the LCHF approach is that yes, it is an all or nothing approach, you can not dip your toes in and out of brief periods of carbohydrate restriction as your body will be in a continual state of switching between differing adaptation states.
Whether or not you would be in “nutritional ketosis” at this level is something I hope Jeff will talk about. You will need to be careful on this one, I often see people (nutrition professors and the like) mix their macronutrient profiles discussion around absolute amounts and % contributions. You then make up the rest of your energy needs with fats which could end up being anywhere between 70-80% of your energy intake which on 2000 calories a day would be about 150-180g of fat. A former athlete and competitive powerlifter, he continues to follow the principles of a diet low in carbohydrate while training regularly for strength and health.
But that is most likely an artefact of the duration of non-endurance events – not much time to suck down a ricotta stuffed olive when your 100m event is over in 9 and a bit seconds; and nor do you have the hands free in a power lifting event. This research is quite repeatable and has led to feeding strategies such as carb loading and the like being standard approaches to enhance performance.
In their book “Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance” There is discussion of studies reporting in LCHF participants in which protein sparing occurs via reduced oxidation of the Branched Chain Amino Acids.
Jeff and Steve’s books often state it as no more than 5-10% of your total daily energy intake from carbs (so for someone on 2000 calories that would be a max of 50g). This would suggest for athletes preparing for events that are not typically endurance but reliant on muscle power, perhaps the LCHF will have a place – we just need for literature to get there. These are athletes that are most likely consuming large amounts of carbohydrates each day of their lives and as such have an energy system that is dependent on carbohydrate fuels.



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