Jointer Planer Combination Machines,Wooden Box With Compartments,woodworking cabinetry books - How to DIY

26.01.2015
To solve this problem, I wonder if Hammer could include a short axle to attach to the base perpendicular to the jointer bed to be used with a matching cleat.
For a given board width and species, planing with the A3-31 with conventional blades is a lot quieter than with my DeWalt 735 planer even with the excellent Shelix cutterhead. The object of all of this is to get the machine to produce surfaces within the tolerances you need for the work you want to do.
This final installment in the series will discuss changing blades in the Hammer A3-31 and some summary thoughts on jointer-planer combo machines. The factory settings, which I assessed when the machine was new and the knives were fresh, were excellent; no changes needed! When the machine arrived, the beds were slightly out of parallel to each other across their widths (i.e. The most welcome feature is that the adjustments hold solidly over time and when converting back and forth from jointer to planer mode. When considering a new machine or any tool, I first assess the quality of the key parts that cannot be altered by the user but are accessible to direct evaluation. For edge jointing the guard can be adjusted laterally to expose the minimum width of cutterhead. Other key components that I cannot directly assess seem very good based on indirect observations and working with the machine.
Doing it all by hand is just too slow and tedious for most of us, but a hybrid approach employing a portable thickness planer is very practical. The big problem here is that jointers with widths that approach even inexpensive portable thickness planers are big and expensive. In a single machine with a fairly small footprint, you get an excellent 12″ of planing and matching jointing capacity. By way of explaining how I settled on the combination machine, let me recount my stock preparation history.
So, I got one of those ubiquitous cast iron 6″ jointers, and rigged up a marginally effective way to also use it as a thicknesser.


Keep in mind that with a thickness planer as the only machine available, the initial jointing of one face by hand (which, again, I’d rather not do!) only has to produce a surface that will sit on the planer bed without twist, bow, or flex. It might work only with the jointer beds raised but that would be good enough to just get the machine through narrow doors. The methods of adjustment will, of course, depend on the make and model of your machine, but hopefully this will clarify the overall logic of the process. For the reasons explained in this series, I highly recommend a 12″ jointer-planer combination machine for the small shop woodworker. It references an earlier design of the machine and much of the adjustment parts have changed. The User Manual, included in print with the machine and also available online, is more current and clearly explains assembly, basic adjustments, operation, maintenance, and so forth. For most fence positions, the net depth of the unit is about the same with the jointer beds down or raised.
A Felder 12″ jointer-planer lists at over $7000 (ouch, my hand just cramped up at the keyboard), which is more than twice the price of the Hammer A3-31.
Prior to discussing the ins and outs of the Hammer machine, let’s look at the rationale for a combination jointer-planer in the small shop. One face is made flat but very rough using scrub and jack planes, just enough so it does not rock or distort on the planer bed, and there is no bow (lengthwise curve on the face).
This wonderfully accurate machine, with its precise cast aluminum tables and great Tersa cutterhead, served well in my shop for more than ten years, perched on the feature-rich, battleship-grade stand I made for it. I made the case several years ago for a portable jointer-planer as an excellent choice for a first machine for small-shop woodworkers making furniture and accessories. It can be ugly with tearout, scrub plane gutters, or whatever; it just has to register on the bed so the planer can produce a flat surface on the opposite face.
A lifting bar is inserted into a cleat near the bottom of the base of the machine to roll it in a straight line and make partial J turns. I ended up having to transfer the machine from the pallet onto a dolly that I built and use plywood sheets to get it over doorway bumps – a big hassle.


As with any machine, there are a few shortcomings (for this fastidious woodworker), which I’ve covered, but this is an excellent machine that can be a great partner as you pursue excellent woodworking. To my mind, this is like have a concavity along the full length of a jointer plane sole and would make accurate jointing difficult at best. Fortunately, Hammer makes knowledgeable technicians available by phone who were generous with their time in helping me understand the machine.
I always use paddles for face jointing and it is easy to pass the board under the narrow guard, which is height-adjustable using the knob at the far left in the photo below. The planer flattens the opposite face, the board is then flipped and the planer makes the first face flat and parallel.
As for efficiency, well, I like making things and I do not want to spend forever grunting out stock, so the noise emanating from well-tuned machinery is music to my ears at the start of a project. The tables remain parallel when raised so the effective width of the machine is approximately unchanged.
In my opinion, there is no need to have the entire board length supported on either the infeed or outfeed table to do accurate jointing. By contrast, changing blades on the Tersa cutterhead that was in the Inca jointer-planer was almost unbelievably easy and fast.
Hand adjusted parts, such as the planer bed adjustment are very smooth, and the machine runs with that nice low hum suggestive of quality. The OEM system on the Dewalt DW735 planer was quite easy, and now with the Shelix cutterhead with carbide-tipped inserts installed, changing blades is practically a non-issue. Still, I was stuck with only 6″ of machine jointing capacity and, despite trying the workarounds found in the tips sections of magazines, I was still doing too much hand work and longed for more machine jointing width, especially since I enjoy using fairly wide boards in my projects.



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Comments to “Jointer Planer Combination Machines”

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